Cubs challenging Castro to step up his game

683414.png

Cubs challenging Castro to step up his game

MESA, Ariz. Starlin Castro says hes ready to focus on baseball.

Castro didnt hide behind an interpreter when he reported to camp and addressed the sexual assault allegations that surfaced during the offseason (though he also didnt offer much substance either).

Cubs executives are glad their 21-year-old All-Star shortstop is here, and have directed everything toward Castros representatives, whove vehemently denied the claims.

So underneath the Arizona sunshine, the Cubs will push Castro to get better, and realize his almost unlimited potential.

Manager Dale Sveum has watched Castro closely during the teams first three workouts at Fitch Park. An old shortstop, Sveum has stressed gaining ground when the ball is hit, so your feet create momentum and you have a shorter throw.

Sveum has also noticed that Castro picks up the target late and tends to move his shoulders out of line, forcing too many throws that are too high or in the dirt.

I can relate to Castro, Sveum said Sunday. When I was young, I made a lot of errors. Some of the things Im telling him are some of the same things I (heard). They happen to a lot of people. My best friend Robin Yount made 80 errors his first two years in the big leagues. He turned out to be a pretty good defensive player. The will has to be there to do it. Thats the key.

Yount actually had 75 errors combined in his age-19 and age-20 seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers, but whos counting? He has a Hall of Fame plaque in Cooperstown, N.Y.

Castro has similar ambitions, but for now the Cubs are focused on overall team defense. Last season Castro committed 29 of the teams 134 errors, which led the majors by a wide margin. But they were defensively poor by almost any metric or eye test.

Its not just errors that come into play either, Sveum said. Its the awareness of whats going on, whos on the mound, where to play, the score of the game, the depth when theres two outs. These are all the things were talking about and getting ironed out to where we can nullify a lot of hits (opponents) got last year. Defense is everything.

Already, Castro is an offensive force. He led the National League with 207 hits last year. Since 1900, only four players have had more hits in a season at age 21 or younger. Two were Alex Rodriguez and Ty Cobb.

Theo Epsteins front office wants players that grind out at-bats. The Boston Red Sox would play games that lasted four hours and play deep into October. Last season Castro hit .307 with a .341 on-base percentage (the major-league average was .320) and walked only 35 times in more than 700 plate appearances.

The important thing to remember with Starlin is age, Epstein said. If he were 27 years old and had that kind of on-base percentage with the type of incredible offensive ability that he has, I would say thats a problem. If he hadnt learned to fully develop as a hitter: He wasnt a smart hitter. He wasnt disciplined. He wasnt taking advantage of the natural gifts that he has

(But) doing what he did at 21 years old in the big leagues projects extraordinarily well in the future, because its hard to teach (his) natural ability. Its almost impossible.

(Someone) tries to throw a good breaking ball, he sees it right out of the hand and hes on it. The ability (to) barrel up pitches in every part of the strike zone and drive them to the outfield: You cant teach that.

What hitters do learn as they mature is to be smarter, to figure out how pitchers are trying to get them out (and) recognize that they dont need to do the pitchers any favors and expand the strike zone. They end up not only with walks, but pitches they can drive out of the ballpark.

The education of Castro will continue, and the Cubs may still have their face of the franchise.

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Carl Edwards Jr. didn't get a save or a win Monday night, but he was easily the most impressive pitcher on the field for the Cubs.

The 25-year-old right-hander came on in the sixth inning in relief of Eddie Butler and carved through the heart of the Nationals order, needing only 13 pitches to strike out Brian Goodwin, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman.

For starters, Joe Maddon deserves plenty of credit for deploying Edwards in an integral spot, even if it was so early in the game. But the Cubs were clinging to a 1-0 lead at the time and Maddon didn't want Butler to face the Washington order for a third time, so Edwards was the call to keep things close.

And that's exactly what Edwards did in dominant fashion. It was the fourth time this season he struck out three batters in an inning, but in the previous instances, he needed at least 16 pitches to do so.

Here is the complete sequence from Edwards to the three helpless Nats (for one inning, at least):

Harper was also locked in at the plate at the time, as it was his only strikeout in the last two games in which he's collected six hits in eight at-bats.

Edwards has been rolling this season with a 1.72 ERA and sparkling 0.82 WHIP. He has 44 strikeouts in 31.1 innings, ranking 18th in baseball in K/9 (12.64).

Since giving up three runs in an outing June 14 against the Mets, Edwards has not allowed a run in five innings, striking out seven batters and surrendering only two singles and a pair of walks.

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

The Cubs gave Kyle Schwarber time to sort things out by sending him down to Triple-A Iowa, and Schwarber's first game back in the minors shows he may need some time.

Schwarber's first game with the Iowa Cubs was a forgettable one. He struck out in his first three plate appearances before singling in his last at-bat. He struck out looking in the first inning before striking out swinging his next two times up.

Schwarber batted third in the lineup and played left field. Iowa won 1-0 against the New Orleans Baby Cakes.

He last played for Iowa in 2015, but only spent 17 games there. He hit .333 with three homers and a 1.036 OPS in that short stint. Before getting sent down Schwarber was hitting .171 with the Cubs with 12 home runs, but also 75 strikeouts in 64 games.