Cubs dont expect Castro to be a distraction

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Cubs dont expect Castro to be a distraction

MESA, Ariz. The Cubs dont believe a Starlin Castro Watch will dominate the daily headlines from spring training. They say their 21-year-old All-Star shortstop is supposed to report to camp on time next week.

But its something that hangs over the franchise. Castro, who lives in the Dominican Republic during the offseason, met with Chicago police last month while in town for the Cubs Convention. There were questions about an alleged sexual assault that happened almost five months ago.

Castro was not charged with a crime. His attorneys have vehemently denied the allegations. The Cubs have expressed their support, both publicly and in private.

I know theres been full cooperation from every end, Theo Epstein said Saturday. I expect Starlin in camp. Hes getting ready for the season and we dont expect it to be a distraction.

The incident occurred right after the season ended last September. The Cubs president of baseball operations described Castros situation as status quo, though he didnt want to interpret what that means exactly.

Its too sensitive an issue I dont want to speculate, Epstein said. Its really not our investigation. Obviously, what we said at the convention stands. Theres a lot of concern about it and our players have a responsibility to conduct themselves the right way off the field as well as on the field. But as far as I know, there havent been a lot of developments about this story.

At some point, Epstein expects the organization will receive some sort of update from the police. Until then, the Cubs are planning to educate their minor- and major-league players on how to handle fame and the spotlight.

Representatives from the Northeastern University Center for Sport in Society will come in to run several seminars this spring.

(Its) giving them the right tools to deal with difficult situations, Epstein said. Sometimes we take for granted that these young kids because theyre great at what they do on the field know how to handle all the tough circumstances that they find off the field. Its our responsibility as an organization.

We coach them on the field and we expect them to just make great decisions off the field. We need to give them great coaching off the field (to) help make the right decisions.

The Cubs Way means high standards on the field and off the field. (Theres) got to be accountability in wearing this uniform.

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

CSN's David Kaplan and David DeJesus discuss the upcoming matchups in this edition of the Cubs Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

Maybe a four-game series with the N.L. East-leading Washington Nationals will help the Cubs take off. 

It did last year. 

The Cubs swept the Nats early last season, boosting themselves into first place in the National League - a position they wouldn't relinquish. More than a sweep, though, a positive series is vital for a team that continues to hover around .500. 

To do so, Joe Maddon's pitchers must somehow slow the Nationals offense, which has managed to push across more runs than any team in the majors. 

After D.C., the Cubs are off to Cincy for a three-game set with the Reds. 

Watch David Kaplan and David DeJesus preview the upcoming matchups in the video above. 

Cubs not worrying about a thing after split with Marlins: 'We're right there'

Cubs not worrying about a thing after split with Marlins: 'We're right there'

MIAMI – Jon Jay walked into a quiet clubhouse late Sunday morning, turned right and headed directly toward the sound system in one corner of the room, plugging his phone into the sound system and playing Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds.”

The Cubs outfielder whistled as he changed into his work clothes at Marlins Park, singing along to the lyrics with Anthony Rizzo a few lockers over: “Don’t worry, about a thing, ‘cause every little thing gonna be all right.” 

That’s what the Cubs keep telling themselves, because most of them have World Series rings and the National League Central is such a bad division.

“The biggest thing is to keep the floaties on until we get this thing right,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 4-2 loss left the Cubs treading water again at 38-37. “We’re solvent. We’re right there. We’re right next to first place.”

The Cubs will leave this tropical environment and jump into the deep end on Monday night for the start of a four-game showdown against the Washington Nationals in the nation’s capital.

Miami sunk the Cubs in the first inning when Addison Russell made a costly error on the routine groundball Miami leadoff guy Ichiro Suzuki chopped to shortstop, a mistake that helped create three unearned runs. Martin Prado drilled Mike Montgomery’s first-pitch fastball off the left-center field wall for a two-out double and a 3-0 lead. Montgomery (1-4, 2.03 ERA) lasted six innings and retired the last 10 batters he faced.

“Keep The Floaties On” sounds like an idea for Maddon’s next T-shirt. The 2017 Cubs haven’t been more than four games over .500 or two games under .500 at any point this season. The 2016 Cubs didn’t lose their 37th game until July 19 and spent 180 days in first place.

“That’s what was so special about it,” Rizzo said. “We boat-raced from Game 1 to Game 7 with a couple bumps in the road, but this is baseball. It’s not going to be all smooth-sailing every day. You got to work through things.”