Cubs on edge after loss to Brewers

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Cubs on edge after loss to Brewers

Sunday, April 10, 2011
Posted: 4:35 p.m. Updated 6:47 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MILWAUKEE Everything will be magnified for this team. Its the way the roster is built and their city is wired.

WATCH: Byrd angry with questions

The Cubs are going to play close games and that means endless opportunities to second-guess and pick apart decisions. Frustrations boiled over after Sundays 6-5 loss to the Brewers at Miller Park.

So when Marlon Byrd singles to lead off the ninth inning and gets thrown out trying to steal second, people will be curious, even when there were several other plays that had a much bigger impact on the game.

Manager Mike Quade called it a miscommunication, something that will be dealt with on Monday to make sure that I didnt screw the damn thing up and I might have. But I didnt care for that situation.

Byrd refused to discuss the situation beyond saying he looks at the third-base coach and repeating the same words seven times: Did I go?

Next question, Byrd said. Done.

There were more significant game-changing moments, but the reaction showed a Cubs team on edge after missing out on another chance to win a series. They went 2-for-17 with runners in scoring position on Sunday and left nine men on base.

(We were) looking for a knockout punch all day long offensively, Quade said. We had a ton of chances. We just got to keep pounding and find a way to put teams away when we get them on the ropes.

It should be pointed out that Byrd scored three runs on Sunday and raised his average to .342. And that the Cubs havent stolen a base in the first nine games of the season for the first time since 1941.

But if the Cubs are going to contend, its going to be with pitching, not speed. Promoted from Triple-A Iowa, Casey Coleman made it through five innings and for the most part minimized the damage.

Coleman gave up two two-run homers to Prince Fielder and Ryan Braun. What really bothered Quade was a pickoff attempt moments before Fielders bomb in the first.

The manager ran out to first base to argue that Carlos Pena had tagged out Carlos Gomez before he dove back to the bag. With that Coleman would have escaped the inning.

There were plenty of mistakes made, both by guys in uniform and guys not in uniform, Quade said. We made our share. You got to get people out. Whether you get a break here or there or a break goes against you, you still got to play.

Still, it was all in front of the Cubs (4-5), who had a one-run lead and Sean Marshall, Kerry Wood and Carlos Marmol ready to handle the last three innings.

Wood began the eighth with a walk and it unraveled from there. Casey McGehee a player the Brewers once grabbed off waivers from the Cubs stepped in as a pinch-hitter with two outs.

McGehee sent a 94 mph fastball screaming past the wall in right-center field and into the Cubs bullpen for a two-run homer that brought a crowd of 37,193 to its feet.

Wood stood in front of his locker and took responsibility for the pitch. He understands that most days there wont be any margin for error.

We knew we were going to play tight games, Wood said. Thats part of it, but (when) you start the inning off with a walk you put yourself behind the eight-ball.

The Cubs havent got off to the fast start they talked about in spring training. A bounce here or a bounce there and its not that hard to picture the Cubs enjoying three consecutive series wins right now. But it doesnt work that way, and theyre losing ground.

You think theyre going to bounce your way eventually, (that) youre going to get some breaks, Wood said. (But) theres no question weve got to win that game and win that series. It didnt happen.

Box Score
PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

We finally have a full glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie."

Joe Maddon's luxury RV has been name-dropped ever since before the celebrity manager became embedded forever in Cubs lore.

Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer tell the story about sitting with Maddon down in Pensacola, Fla., outside the "Cousin Eddie" as the trio discussed Maddon coming to manage the Cubs.

[SHOP: Get your Cubs gear right here] 

Maddon has since mentioned the RV several times as his offseason oasis.

Nearly two-and-a-half years later, we can now catch a glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie" as Maddon was recently profiled on "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel:"

The pimped-out RV has four TVs, a fireplace, heated floors, a sweet kitchen with a regular-sized fridge and on and on.

His RV is better than most apartments in Chicago.

Essentially, it's good to be Joe Maddon.

The Maddon profile airs Tuesday night on HBO at 9 p.m. CT.

Check out a full trailer:

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

For more than a decade, Cubs fans probably thought Sammy Sosa could walk on water.

They weren't alone in that respect.

In a recent tell-all interview with Chuck Wasserstrom, Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ being accused of being a witch when the Cubs icon was asked about being accused of PEDs.

"Chuck, it’s like Jesus Christ when he came to Jerusalem," Sosa says. "Everybody thought Jesus Christ was a witch (laughing) – and he was our savior. So if they talk (poop) about Jesus Christ, what about me?"

Talk about a God complex.

It's been 10 years since Sosa last suited up in the big leagues — and 13 years since his Cubs career ended — but the slugger is still just as polarizing as ever in the candid interview. Wasserstrom was let go by Theo Epstein and the Cubs in 2012 after spending 24 years in the organization in the media relations and baseball information departments.

[RELATED - Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture]

Sosa talks a lot about his pride and it's very clear from his answers about coming back to Chicago and being a part of the current Cubs product that his pride is a major factor steering his ship even still.

He even drops a line in there:

"When nobody knew who Chicago was, I put Chicago on the map."

I'm not sure exactly what he means by that, to be honest. I would venture almost everybody in the world knew what Chicago was before 1992. It is the third biggest city in America.

If he means the Cubs, well, the Cubs were Lovable Losers and a draw for so many people well before Sosa got there. 

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Of course, Sosa did do some absolutely incredible things for the Cubs and the entire game of baseball. Many believe he and Mark McGwire helped put baseball on the map again in a resurgent 1998 season that helped make the strike of 1994/95 an afterthought. Count me among that group, as well.

He deserves all the credit in the world. People would show up to Wrigley just to see Sosa run out to the right field bleachers and camera bulbs flashed by the thousands every single time he came up to the plate for the better part of a decade. Waveland was sometimes so packed with ballhawks that there wouldn't be room to walk.

I also agree wholeheartedly with Sosa when he says, "you're never going to see the show Mark [McGwire] and I put on [again]." He's right. That was an event that transfixed the nation and will absolutely be something I tell my kids and grandkids and — hopefully — my greatgrandkids about.

Sosa continued to push the onus of any possible reunion with the Cubs on the orgainzation, saying he would absolutely say "yes" if they ever extended an invite to join Wrigley Field.

But he wants to do it "in style."

"If one day they want to do something, I want to do it in style. If it’s going to happen, it’s got to be the right way. Don’t worry, one day they’re going to do it. I’m not in a rush.”

Sosa also said he would rather have all the money — he earned more than $124 million in his career — than be in the Hall of Fame.

Go read the entire interview with Wasserstrom. It's as transparent as you'll see Sosa, especially nowadays.