Cubs expect bigger and better season from Castro

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Cubs expect bigger and better season from Castro

Monday, March 14, 2011
Posted: 9:07 p.m.
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

PEORIA, Ariz. The marketing department at 1060 W. Addison St. wants to promote Starlin Castro as the next Derek Jeter.

They paired the two homegrown shortstops on billboards modeled after heavyweight prize fights: Cubs vs. Yankees, June 17-19 at Wrigley Field.

Jeter, a Madison Avenue icon, has his own brand. Hes built a gigantic new mansion in Tampa, Fla., that The New York Times said was about as big as a typical Best Buy store, his own St. Jetersburg.

Castro, who turns 21 next week, had his parents fly in from the Dominican Republic to live with him during spring training.

Cubs baseball staffers use the Jeter analogy in a much different context. They tell you to look up how many errors Jeter committed in the minors. That tension between patience and expectations can be felt through the entire organization.

Whats overlooked sometimes is the sense that teammates genuinely like the kid. Heres what you heard Saturday in the HoHoKam Park clubhouse after Castro hit his second home run in Las Vegas:

Do it, Starlin!

Thats whats Im talking about, Cassie!

They were hooting and hollering while watching the split-squad game on TV. By the end of the weekend, Castro was hitting .485 with a .500 on-base percentage and an .848 slugging percentage, numbers that put him among the Cactus League leaders.

Hes not missing (and) hes using the whole field, manager Mike Quade said. Youd like to think hes maturing. (Hes) a talented young hitter thats getting better.

Castro also left Las Vegas with a bruised right knee that isnt considered serious. At this point, the Cubs are more concerned with his mental adjustments.

Almost two weeks ago, Quade met with Castro about demanding a more intense approach in his practice sessions. That meant doing infield work at game speed and running the bases with a purpose. It just got buried because it happened on the same day Carlos Silva and Aramis Ramirez nearly fought in the dugout.

Is it inexperience? Is it concentration or focus? Quade told reporters that day. Im not interested in panicking, but (lets) be sure you understand (whats important).

These mistakes happen to everyone. Castros are just magnified because of the team he plays for and the market he works in now.

Jeter was about a month away from his 21st birthday when he made his big-league debut, and he finished his first full season in the majors at age 22. He was allowed to commit 133 errors in the minors.

Long before he became famous for dating Hollywood starlets, Jeter made 56 errors in 126 games for the 1993 Class-A Greensboro Hornets.

At age 20, Castro was involved in so much, so soon that it was hard to tell where his ceiling might be. The Cubs downplayed his offensive potential and assured everyone that he would be a huge defensive upgrade over Ryan Theriot.

Castros 27 errors last season second-most among all major-league players should be the quickest fix to his game. He hit only nine home runs in 995 career minor-league at-bats, but flashed signs of power in 125 games with the Cubs: 31 doubles; five triples; and three homers.

Hes a young kid with a lot of talent, said Augie Ojeda, the 36-year-old infielder who was brought into camp to help mentor Castro. (Hes) so gifted and the futures so bright for him. Hes got to keep working at it and the skys the limit.

Castros already responded to being benched last September. He made enough adjustments at the plate to finish last season hitting .300. His month-to-month splits reveal someone trying to figure things out: .310; .227; .361; .336; .215.

On an aging roster filled with veterans over 30, and in a lineup that at times struggled to score runs last season, Castro is one player who can get better in a hurry. Castros teammates dont believe in the hype to sell tickets. They know he will help them win games.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

SportsTalk Live: David DeJesus discusses time spent with Joe Maddon, World Series criticism

SportsTalk Live: David DeJesus discusses time spent with Joe Maddon, World Series criticism

"Be sexy."

That was one of two rules manager Joe Maddon told David DeJesus when the Tampa Bay Rays acquired him in 2013.

DeJesus appeared on SportsTalk Live on Wednesday to discuss his time spent with Maddon in Tampa Bay.

"Just be yourself out there," DeJesus said of Maddon when the Rays traded for him. "I want you to have fun and I want you to just have that ora of 'just don't worry, just go out there and play.' It kept the whole team loose."

DeJesus also shared his thoughts on Maddon's questionable managerial decisions in the World Series.

Hear that, and more, in the video above.

Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture

Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture

Sammy Sosa has stayed so far off the radar that his long-running absence from Cubs Convention didn't even come up during last weekend's Q&A session with ownership.

And the Cubs can't go viral all the time and dominate every offseason news cycle, with the National Baseball Hall of Fame revealing the election results on Wednesday and welcoming Jeff Bagwell, Tim Raines and Ivan Rodriguez as part of its 2017 class.

But it's become out of sight, out of mind for Sosa, who barely crossed the 5-percent threshold (8.6) needed to remain on the Baseball Writers' Association of America ballot for another year.

Sosa — a seven-time All Star, 1998 National League MVP and the franchise's all-time leader with 545 home runs (and 609 overall) — hadn't gained any traction at all during his first four years under BBWAA consideration, hovering between 12.5 and 6.6 percent.

It's complicated with Sosa, a diva personality who experienced a dramatic late-career renaissance and got named in a New York Times report that exposed him as one of the players who tested positive for a performance-enhancing drug in 2003 (during what was supposed to be an anonymous survey).

The Cubs have undergone a complete makeover since Sosa walked out in 2004, leaving him without many allies in the organization. It's nothing personal, but in the past the Ricketts family has hinted that Sosa could mend certain fences and fill in some of the blanks he once left open during an unconvincing performance in front of Congress.

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The Cubs brought Hall of Famers Billy Williams, Fergie Jenkins and Ryne Sandberg to meet President Barack Obama during their Martin Luther King Jr. Day visit to the White House and keep adding former players to the front office. It's awkward after a World Series run where so many alumni showed up to do TV work, throw first pitches, spray champagne or simply watch a rare playoff game at Wrigley Field.

— If Sosa's looking for a roadmap, Manny Ramirez did his penance and cooperated with Major League Baseball to the point where Cubs president Theo Epstein shockingly hired him as a Triple-A Iowa player/coach in the middle of the 2014 season, something that would have been unthinkable during their clashes with the Boston Red Sox.

As a hitting consultant, Ramirez took a come-and-go-as-you-please arrangement, becoming a national story during the 2015 playoffs but largely staying away from the 2016 championship team, perhaps gearing up for his independent-ball comeback in Japan this year. Even after failing multiple drug tests, one of the greatest right-handed hitters of his generation still finished at 23.8 percent in his first year on the BBWAA ballot.

— Lee Smith (34.2 percent) — a drafted-and-developed Cub and the franchise's all-time leader with 180 saves — didn't come close in his 15th and final time on the BBWAA ballot. Smith had been grandfathered when the Hall of Fame narrowed the eligibility window to 10 years, possibly trying to squeeze Steroid Era symbols like Roger Clemens (54.1 percent) and Barry Bonds (53.8 percent).

— This will make Cub fans feel old: Kerry Wood and Carlos Zambrano are Hall of Fame-eligible for the first time in 2018, when based off this year's returns Trevor Hoffman (74) and Vladimir Guerrero (71.7) should be building momentum toward the 75 percent needed for induction into Cooperstown.