Cubs looking in at 'Why not us?' World Series

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Cubs looking in at 'Why not us?' World Series

Monday, Oct. 25, 2010
5:00 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

It sounded like a marketing slogan that could be plastered across the side of a bus, or sold on T-shirts outside Wrigley Field. Mike Quade looked out at the row of cameras in a room full of reporters and said those three words.

Eventually the goodwill Quade has built up with the media will begin to evaporate. All it could take is one long losing streak for someone to say that hes in over his bald head, that theres a reason why he had to wait until the age of 53 to get his first major-league managing job.

And as soon as you hear complaints whispered in the clubhouse, someone will wonder: Why did management ever listen to those player endorsements on such an underachieving team? Until then, a 24-13 finish will be the jumping-off point for 2011.

Im smart enough to know that six weeks doesnt make six months, Quade said. But when I saw the improvement in the kids and the way we pitched it (and) played the last six weeks, (Ill) believe that from Day 1: Why not us?

Well, there is more than a century of losing that has defined the Cubs, and the Prospect High School graduate gets the culture and expectations he will face as the franchises 51st manager.

But when the 106th World Series begins Wednesday night at AT&T Park, the San Francisco Giants and Texas Rangers will be asking the same thing: Why not us?

Months ago, that question would have seemed like a reach, when the Rangers were in full crisis-management mode, awaiting their fate in bankruptcy court and responding to the news that their manager had tested positive for cocaine.

The Giants spent only 37 days in first place, and lost 515 games of manpower to the disabled list this season, and theyve took on players that seemingly no one else wanted.

Both teams are from baseballs middle class, with their combined Opening Day payroll (153.9 million) nearly matching what the Cubs had committed (146.6 million) for 2010. Heres what the Cubs can learn from each team as they rebuild for Year 103:

Show some faith in the manager. The Giants didnt show real progress until the end of Bruce Bochys three-year deal. Beginning in 2007, their win totals went like this: 71, 72 and 88. They finished last, fourth and third in the National League West before finally winning the division with a pitching staff Bochy handles expertly.

It would have been easy for the Rangers to fire Ron Washington after they learned of his failed drug test last year. What could have torn the clubhouse apart instead brought it together. Everyone has access to the same statistics and will agree on most in-game decisions. But managing is about so much more than numbers. Its building relationships, handling egos and deflecting distractions.

Huge long-term contracts dont have to be crippling. Barry Zito is in the middle of a seven-year, 126 million deal, but hasnt been given a spot on the playoff roster because the Giants have four strong starters drafted and developed by the organization Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Jonathan Sanchez and Madison Bumgarner.

The Cubs can afford the decline of Alfonso Soriano who will be owed 18 million annually across the next four seasons if first-round picks Tyler Colvin and Brett Jackson become All-Star-level players in the same outfield.

The market has changed. Zitos deal makes Carlos Zambranos five-year, 91.5 million contract seem reasonable by comparison but both came out of a different economic climate. Aubrey Huff hit free agency and then had to wait until the middle of January to sign a one-year deal that amounted to a 5 million pay cut. For their 3 million, the Giants received 26 home runs and 86 RBI.

San Francisco has been resourceful throughout the season, signing Pat Burrell (18 homers and 51 RBI in 96 games) to a minor-league contract in May and claiming future NLCS MVP Cody Ross off waivers three months later. The Rangers made a similar low-risk, high-reward investment in designated hitter Vladimir Guerrero, getting a return of 29 homers and 115 RBI for roughly 6.5 million.

Talent is everywhere. Kosuke Fukudome will never live up to the 48 million it cost to import him from Japan, but that doesnt mean the outfielder cant be effective with a more limited role in the right situation, or that the Cubs should give up their international scouting efforts.

Colby Lewis pitched in five different organizations before moving abroad and spending two seasons with Hiroshima Carp. This year, Lewis returned to the Rangers the team that originally chose him in the first round of the 1999 draft and gave them 32 starts, 201 innings and two victories that helped eliminate the New York Yankees and win the pennant.

Dont fall in love with your prospects. The Rangers have been sensitive to Josh Hamiltons addictions during celebrations that are typically soaked in beer and champagne. It took almost eight years for the first overall pick in the 1999 amateur draft to control his demons and make his major-league debut.

Hamilton was selected by the Cubs in the 2006 Rule 5 draft, flipped to the Cincinnati Reds the same day and later traded to Texas, where hes made the All-Star team three consecutive years. Projecting what sort of man a high school kid will be is never easy. When a game-changer like Cliff Lee whos now 7-0 with a 1.26 ERA in eight career postseason starts becomes available you cash in your trading chips.

Be creative when assembling the bullpen. Opponents hit .236 against Giants relievers, who posted a 2.99 ERA and inherited the most runners in the league (278) but allowed the lowest percentage to score (23.7). Brian Wilson, their eccentric, bearded closer, fell to the 24th round before the Giants drafted him in 2003. Guillermo Mota was a non-roster invitee to spring training and Javier Lopez and Ramon Ramirez were acquired at the July 31st deadline. Imagine the impact they could have had on a Cubs team that lost 32 one-run games in 2010 and had more than half of their games decided by two runs or less.

Develop a short memory. Until this month, the Rangers had never won a postseason series. The Giants havent won a World Series since relocating to the Bay Area in 1958. Dusty Baker managed the Giants the last time they made it and within days, he would be introduced as the next Cubs manager, a job he wasnt completely prepared for.

Nobody lets anything go of the past, Baker said last summer at Wrigley Field. Everybodys still counting. I was here four out of the 100 years. Most people act like I was here the whole 100.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Impressions of Aroldis Chapman as Cubs head to Dodger Stadium

Impressions of Aroldis Chapman as Cubs head to Dodger Stadium

SAN DIEGO – The Los Angeles Dodgers made an honorable no-tolerance statement on domestic violence, or their high-powered front office didn’t do enough homework on Aroldis Chapman, or a Hollywood franchise couldn’t deal with the bad optics.

Maybe all those factors swirled together as a deal with the Cincinnati Reds collapsed during the winter meetings, the police report surfacing weeks after an ugly incident at Chapman’s South Florida home. 

The New York Yankees scavenged and acquired the superstar closer at a steep discount in late December, before the Broward County State Attorney’s Office decided to not file criminal charges, and before Major League Baseball imposed a 30-game suspension to start this season. 

The Cubs handled Chapman’s transition in a clumsy, awkward manner after that blockbuster trade with the Yankees one month ago, looking unprepared for his welcome-to-Chicago press conference with coach Henry Blanco sitting there as the translator, and sounding insensitive when the Wrigley Field sound system played a 1997 Prodigy song called: “Smack My B---- Up.”

The Cubs hired a new translator – and fired a DJ – and now have Chapman’s 100-mph velocity waiting for a potential playoff preview that begins Friday night at Dodger Stadium.

“The talent is even more impressive when you’re actually there watching it on your side,” manager Joe Maddon said. “That life at home plate is purely different. It’s just different what the baseball does.

“It’s obvious to me that you have to get in there and talk to him and develop that relationship. He’s smiling more easily already and the conversation’s actually coming back to me in English a little bit, which is fun to hear, so I’ve been really happy about that.”

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Whether or not Dodger fans stay until the end to watch a first-place team that has weathered Clayton Kershaw’s back injury – and the 26 other players who have spent time on the disabled list this season, tying a major-league record – watching Chapman is a unique experience even for an MVP candidate or a Cy Young Award winner. 

“It’s fun hearing the crowd do their oohs and aahs on every pitch,” first baseman Anthony Rizzo said, “how engaged they are, and how excited they are when he comes in to pitch.”

“A lot of the players are almost in the same amount of awe that the fans are,” pitcher Jake Arrieta said. “When you see a guy like Chapman go out there and compete and perform, there’s a lot of appreciation and respect for what he’s capable of, because, frankly, the game’s never really seen anything like it, especially from the left side. 

“We’ve seen a lot of hard throwers. But when you see a scouting report that’s 100-to-105 (mph), he’s a one-of-one type of guy. You definitely stop and watch when he’s out there.”

Chapman – who can cash in as a free agent after this season – has so far answered the legitimate questions about how he would fit into a laid-back clubhouse and effect best-team-in-baseball chemistry.

“He’s an absolute professional,” Arrieta said. “I’m very attentive to details. (I’m) watching the way he goes about his routine and (how) it starts for a 7 o’clock game. He’s starting right around 2:30, 3 o’clock, getting ready for that ninth inning.

“He’s getting his body ready. He’s getting his mind ready. You can see his focus. A guy like that, he obviously has his routine down extremely well, so it’s really nice to kind of watch him throughout the day. What’s he doing at 3:30? What’s he doing at 4:30? What’s he doing at 6 o’clock? He’s constantly doing things to prepare himself for those three outs.

“That’s why he’s so successful. Obviously, he’s very gifted. His velocity, his presence and his size alone are extremely tough to defeat. But when you see the amount of hours that he puts into those three outs, it makes you realize why he’s able to go out there and be as successful as he is.”

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Chapman hasn’t quite been the add-on to a dominant bullpen the Cubs envisioned, because top setup guy Pedro Strop (knee) and former closer Hector Rondon (triceps) are on the disabled list. Maddon also had to curb his enthusiasm for four-out saves and realize Chapman – who’s allowed four of eight inherited runners to score – prefers to work one inning at a time.  

But Chapman has been as good as advertised, going 9-for-11 in save chances, allowing two earned runs in 15 appearances and striking out 21 of the 48 batters he’s faced while giving up only three walks.   

“It’s probably a demoralizing feeling for the other team to see him warming up,” pitcher Jason Hammel said. “Big-league hitters will hit a fastball after a while if they see it enough. But he makes guys take some pretty silly hacks.”

“You can literally hear the ball out of his hand,” pitching coach Chris Bosio said. “He can make the seams sing a little bit with the power he’s getting.”

Dodger Stadium draws celebrities to an iconic site, creates a sense of energy and gets louder and louder. But after a series of decisions that could echo into October, Wrigley Field is where Rage Against the Machine’s “Wake Up” blasts from the speakers as Chapman warms up and the fans look up at the video board after each pitch.   

“The guys on the bench are like mimicking what the crowd is doing,” Maddon said. “It’s wonderful. How many pitchers elicit that kind of reaction? There’s a couple, but you’re anticipating that big number and we’ve never seen that here. 

“But most any place you’ve not seen it. (It’s) the reputation, where he’s come from – and his presence and how big he is – he’s so formidable and imposing. And now he’s our toy.”

Cubs catcher Willson Contreras looks ready for prime time

Cubs catcher Willson Contreras looks ready for prime time

SAN DIEGO – Within 24 hours at Petco Park, Cubs catcher Willson Contreras handled the wild movement of Jake Arrieta’s pitches and framed the edges of the strike zone for Kyle Hendricks, showing the dexterity to handle a playoff rotation.

Contreras looked ready for prime time on Tuesday night and Wednesday afternoon, helping shut down the San Diego Padres and complete a three-game sweep where two National League Cy Young Award candidates found a rhythm while throwing to a rookie catcher.

“Everything’s a lot easier,” Contreras said after a 6-3 victory. “I’m way more comfortable right now, because my first week everything was speeding up on me. But now I’m able to slow down the game and do my job.” 

The day after Arrieta fell one inning short of a two-hit, complete-game shutout, Hendricks credited Contreras for calling more curveballs and getting him through a stretch where the Padres put the leadoff man on base in each of the first four innings. 

“From the get-go, I wasn’t shaking him off,” Hendricks said. “We’ve been rolling for the last five, six starts, at least. It’s been easy.” 

Contreras has now caught Arrieta twice, and got one-start exposure to Jon Lester, while developing chemistry with Hendricks, John Lackey and Jason Hammel, which means veteran catcher Miguel Montero might not have a spot on the postseason roster if this continues.

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Contreras is a dynamic presence, launching his eighth home run on Wednesday afternoon and keeping the Padres stationary after Tuesday night’s laser throw to pick off a runner at third base. 

“I was waiting for somebody to run,” Contreras said. “But they didn’t run, so I’ll have to save it for another game.”

The Cubs are nearing the point where a 24-year-old player who didn’t make his big-league debut until June 17 could be behind the plate for the biggest games in franchise history.

“In this clubhouse, we are like a family,” Contreras said. “Once you get here, you start feeling comfortable the first day. You don’t even know that you are a rookie who just came up.”

Kyle Hendricks keeps rolling as Cubs sweep away Padres

Kyle Hendricks keeps rolling as Cubs sweep away Padres

SAN DIEGO – Kyle Hendricks reported to spring training as a fifth starter, leads the majors in ERA in late August and could pitch Game 1 in a playoff series. That gradual evolution from possible question mark at the back of the rotation into a National League Cy Young Award candidate highlights how the Cubs have transformed from a team that won the offseason to one that owns the summer and maybe this fall. 

In his own understated way, Hendricks smashed any perceptions of that ceiling, performing at a level and with a consistency that matches the franchise’s young hitting stars, mirroring their baseball IQ and grounded nature, without the billboards and flair for social media. 

Hendricks kept rolling on a beautiful Wednesday afternoon at Petco Park, knocking the San Diego Padres off-balance and finishing the three-game sweep with a 6-3 victory. That pushed the Cubs to 36 games over .500 for the first time since finishing their 1945 pennant-winning season at 98-56. The best team in baseball could play a little over .500 (19-17) down the stretch and still reach 100 wins.

A Dartmouth College graduate with an Ivy League degree in economics helped create all this momentum – and certainly knows what he wants to do on the mound – but Hendricks as an ace still seems beyond the wildest internal preseason projection.

“I thought he ended really well last year and that there was a lot to look forward to,” manager Joe Maddon said. “He’s just taken it to another level right now. He’s in that 26-27-year-old range where a young pitcher who’s had some major-league experience can really find his next level. And I think that’s what’s going on. He’s such a wonderful student. The difference between last year and this year is the confidence thing: ‘I belong here. I can do this. I’m one of the best.’ 

“A lot of our guys are going through that moment right now. And I think that’s what you’re seeing out of Kyle. I’ve talked about the couple tweaks he’s made regarding the four-seam fastball and curveball usage. That makes him a little bit different. But more than anything, I think he believes he’s among the best right now.”

The Padres (53-74) looked a little checked out and didn’t really put much pressure on a Cubs team that should get an adrenaline boost this weekend at Dodger Stadium. Dexter Fowler and Kris Bryant opened the game with back-to-back doubles before Ben Zobrist lined a two-run triple into the right-center field gap. Within six minutes of Paul Clemens’ first pitch, Jorge Soler’s sacrifice fly made it 3-0.

Hendricks hasn’t allowed more than three earned runs in a start since May 17, a run of 17 straight outings that has sliced his ERA from 3.51 to 2.19 while pushing his record to 12-7.

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Hendricks hides his emotions and didn’t get flustered when the Padres put the leadoff man on base in each of the first four innings, working around the traffic to limit San Diego to two runs and finish with eight strikeouts. 

Hendricks made it through six innings – he’s now gone at least five in each of his 24 starts this year – after beginning the day with a FanGraphs soft-hit rate (26 percent of batted balls) that led the majors and would be the highest mark in the last five seasons.

Hendricks has to pitch a different game than Jake Arrieta, but with an 8-1 record and a 1.38 ERA in his last 13 starts, he might be this year’s breakthrough performer who helps carry the Cubs into October.

“I’m just trying to stay where I’m at and keep the consistency,” Hendricks said. “Keep my pitches feeling good, keep my command. It’s just staying in my routine and really not doing too much – not doing less – just kind of riding it out until I feel something change.”