Chicago Cubs

Cubs make first move with DeJesus deal

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Cubs make first move with DeJesus deal

Updated 6:00 p.m.

This isnt a megadeal. But its exactly the kind of incremental, sensible move Theo Epstein seemed to signal when he took over this rebuilding franchise.

The Cubs signed outfielder David DeJesus on Wednesday to a two-year deal with a club option for 2014 while everyone tries to figure out whether they will really go hard after Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder.

Were a major-market team and were going to be involved across the spectrum, general manager Jed Hoyer said. Responding to whether were on or off a certain player, it doesnt really serve our best interests.

This isnt buying at the absolute top of the bubble. DeJesus, who turns 32 next month, will earn 4.25 million in each of the next two seasons, with a 1.5 million buyout built into a 6.5 million option, netting him 10 million guaranteed.

DeJesus has spent his entire major-league career in Kansas City and Oakland. The Cubs view him as an everyday right fielder, an upgrade in several areas the team has been lacking. Hes a left-handed bat, a patient hitter, an athletic defender and a smooth runner on the bases.

DeJesus has a home in Wheaton and will meet the Chicago media on Thursday at Wrigley Field. Epstein has joked about leading the league in press conferences, but this marks the first player signing for the new president of baseball operations.

There are many dominos left to fall. The Cubs dont expect Carlos Pena to accept their arbitration offer, though Hoyer wouldnt say whether the first baseman might fit into their plans as an alternative to Pujols or Fielder.

(Pena) continues to do the same things year after year, which is really impressive, Hoyer said. Hes a very good defender. He gets on base. He has great power. I think hes very confident and he should be that theres a multi-year deal waiting for him.

That could be somewhere else. Ultimately, pitching will become the focus this winter. Hoyer continues to speak with Pat Rooney, the agent for Kerry Wood, and all indications are the new Mr. Cub will return in 2012.

The Cubs are expecting a bounce-back year out of DeJesus, who hit .240 (or 44 points below his career average) with 10 homers and 46 RBI last season in Oakland. They see a .356 lifetime on-base percentage for someone whos struck out only 575 times in more than 4,300 plate appearances.

DeJesus generated 25 homers and 144 RBI combined for Kansas City in 2008 and 2009. He emerged as a sought-after player on the trade market before a thumb injury derailed his 2010 season.

This move turns up the pressure on Tyler Colvin, a first-round pick during the previous administration. Colvin managed to hit 20 homers in only 358 at-bats as a rookie in 2010, but looked lost last season and will have to earn a job in camp.

We signed DeJesus (to) round out our lineup, Hoyer said. Tyler given the year he had needs to bounce back and that comes in spring training. But to say hes out of our plans would be wrong.

Against this backdrop, the Cubs are still absorbing the ramifications of a new collective bargaining agreement.

Labor peace came at a cost to the Cubs, who now wont be able to spend without restraint in the draft and international market. That was supposed to be a centerpiece to their long-term plan, which at first glance didnt seem to have room for a megadeal this winter.

Major League Baseball and the union made these changes for the greater good, Hoyer said. Its our job to figure out how it impacts our strategy. It certainly will. I dont think were at the place right now to be able to say exactly what were going to do because were still meeting on this.

But it is (significant). The teams that adjust quickest theres an advantage (in that) and we need to be among those teams that move quickly.

Wade Davis is the big-game hunter Cubs need now - and maybe in the future

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USA TODAY

Wade Davis is the big-game hunter Cubs need now - and maybe in the future

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – The origin story of Wade Davis transforming into a dominant closer goes back several years ago and involves a black bear on Canadian hunting grounds about 90 minutes outside of Toronto.

This is the rare animal that didn’t make the video tribute the Tampa Bay Rays cut for Cubs manager Joe Maddon when their ex-zookeeper returned this week to Tropicana Field. But if Davis could stay cool facing a 300-something-pound beast, Maddon reasoned, then a late-inning jam shouldn’t seem so daunting.

“You don’t get much reaction from Wade,” Dave Martinez, Maddon’s longtime bench coach, said on the Cubs Talk podcast. “What you see is what you get. I (asked): ‘Hey, I got a place to go bear hunting, you guys want to go?’

“If you can imagine (Wade) and Jeff Niemann — Jeff Niemann’s 6-10 — they sat up in a tree stand. They saw a black bear come out and he shot it. I wish we had the video. The video’s floating around somewhere.

“We were just talking about it the other day. (Former Rays travel director) Jeff Ziegler went with us, too, and he never did get his bear rug. And he got a little bent out of shape about it.”

Martinez doesn’t know where that trophy wound up. But Davis remains the big-game hunter the Cubs need now — and maybe for the future.

“I’m not thinking past the next two weeks, honestly,” team president Theo Epstein said. “It’s bad form to be talking about offseason stuff at this time of the year.

“He’s had a great year. He’s been perfect in save situations. He’s been a leader out there. Any team would love to have him. But we’re not into the winter yet.”

Are the Cubs willing to pay the price for an All-Star, World-Series-tested closer? Can they afford not to?

Epstein’s front office has been philosophically opposed to making long-term investments in closers. But the Cubs are running out of young hitters to trade for short-term fixes, shipping an elite prospect (Gleyber Torres) to the New York Yankees in last summer’s blockbuster Aroldis Chapman deal and getting Davis by moving a diminishing asset (Jorge Soler) to the Kansas City Royals in a winter-meetings swap.

The Cubs also haven’t seen that alternative ninth-inning solution organically develop this season. It’s hard to picture the Cubs just handing Carl Edwards Jr. the closer’s job heading into his second full season in the big leagues. Pedro Strop also looks more like a very good setup guy than a first-choice candidate to be the 2018 closer.

Justin Wilson (5.79 ERA) hasn’t distinguished himself since coming over from the Detroit Tigers at the July 31 trade deadline, the Cubs now using the lefty reliever in low-leverage/mop-up situations to help restore his game. Hector Rondon — who has 77 saves in a Cubs uniform and a checkered medical history — is dealing with right elbow inflammation.

All those moving pieces make Davis (32-for-32 in save chances) an anchor heading into the four-game showdown against the Milwaukee Brewers that begins Thursday night at Miller Park, where Jake Arrieta will be making his first start since straining his right hamstring on Labor Day and limited to 75-80 pitches.

The Cubs have a 3.5-game lead on a Brewers team that hasn’t gone away yet and a single-digit magic number (eight) to clinch the National League Central. Maddon has already signaled that he will deploy Davis for multiple innings when necessary.

“It’s a good feeling to know that he can do it,” Martinez said. “But all in all, you still have to have these other guys contribute, which they have, and get all the bullpen onboard.

“Now each moment is critical and moving forward they’re going to be put in some pretty tough situations. Each one of them has to step up and do their jobs.

“Do we count on Wade? Absolutely. But we also count on these other guys to go out there and perform.”

During the All-Star festivities in Miami, Davis said “some of that seems unrealistic” when asked about the massive free-agent contracts the Yankees and Los Angeles Dodgers gave Chapman (five years, $86 million) and Kenley Jansen (five years, $80 million) last winter.

But this October will be another huge platform for Davis, who said it already felt like that all season at Wrigley Field.

“Every game, there’s always a constant buzz here,” Davis said. “They’re into it. They’re getting loud. It’s a great atmosphere all year long.”

What’s wrong with Jon Lester? And is there enough time for Cubs to fix it?

What’s wrong with Jon Lester? And is there enough time for Cubs to fix it?

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Even in the good times, Jon Lester doesn’t really have great body language, trying to channel his emotions, use that competitive anger and stay focused on the next pitch, so there was no way for him to hide his frustrations this time.

Lester handed the ball to manager Joe Maddon on Wednesday night at Tropicana Field and trudged back toward the visiting dugout with his head down and his team down six runs in the fifth inning of an 8-1 loss to the Tampa Bay Rays that left the Cubs searching for answers.

What’s wrong with Lester? That question snapped the Cubs out of a seven-game winning streak, the talk about playoff rotations and the computer simulations that project the defending World Series champs as a 90-something percent lock to make the postseason again.

The good news for the Cubs is the Milwaukee Brewers failed to gain ground heading into the four-game showdown that begins Thursday night at Miller Park. The magic number to clinch the National League Central is eight after Milwaukee’s 6-4 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates.

But it’s difficult to see the Cubs going on a long October run when Lester – a three-time World Series champion and the Game 1 starter in all three playoff rounds last year – looks this lost. Since coming off the disabled list – the Cubs termed it left lat tightness/general shoulder fatigue – Lester has made four September starts vs. non-contenders and given up 27 hits and 12 walks in 21.1 innings.

“We’re not going to go make excuses and say that’s why I didn’t throw the ball well,” Lester said. “Physically, it’s September. You’re going to have ups and downs. I feel fine. There’s no lingering effects from anything. No, there’s nothing physically wrong.”

Are you convinced Lester is 100 percent healthy?

“He’s not saying anything,” Maddon said. “I don’t see any grimace and I don’t see any like hitch in the giddy-up. I don’t see anything. Since he’s come back, he’s had some wins, but none of them have been necessarily Jon Lester sharp.”

At a time when the $155 million ace is supposed to be building toward October, Lester didn’t have any rhythm – Steven Souza Jr. launched a 92-mph fastball over the fence in left-center field in the first inning – or the stuff to finish off the Rays (zero strikeouts, 23 batters faced).

Lester did his John Lackey impression in the second inning, screaming, stomping and staring when Brad Miller chopped a ball that bounced past first baseman Anthony Rizzo’s glove and into right field for a 2-0 lead.

The Rays have enough history with Lester after their battles against the Boston Red Sox in the American League East and appeared to try to get in his head. Peter Bourjos dropped a perfect bunt, Kevin Kiermaier knocked another RBI single up the middle and Lester escaped only when second baseman Javier Baez started an inning-ending double play on the other side of the bag.

By the fifth inning, Lester was hesitating and making two wobbly throws while Souza stole second and third base. Lester then drilled Evan Longoria’s left foot with a pitch and walked Logan Morrison to load the bases. Wilson Ramos finally knocked out Lester after 86 pitches with a two-run single into right field.

“Obviously, there is some concern,” Maddon said. “I don’t have any reason to give you – other than he had a tough night – and I don’t know why. It just looked different from the side, because we’re normally used to seeing sharp-cornered pitches and a little bit better velocity with everything. It just wasn’t there.”

Lester now has only two regular-season starts left to find it and fix this.

“I’m not worried about it,” Lester said. “When you pitch a long time, and you play this game a long time, you’re going to have the ups and downs. Anybody can have one good year. It’s a matter of going out there and consistently doing it.

“You got to take the good with the bad. We’ll make an adjustment and figure it out. The good thing is it’s not physical. It’s just a matter of getting back to what has been working for me in the past and making those adjustments.”