Cubs make minor leagues a family affair


Cubs make minor leagues a family affair

The Cubs poured almost 12 million into the 2011 amateur draft, tossing lofty signing bonuses at their top picks.

They won't be able to do that anymore with the new CBA rules, but the organization already has something very rare.

In rounds 10 and 11 of the recent draft, the Cubs selected two legacies in Shawon Dunston, Jr. -- son of longtime Cub Shawon Dunston, Sr. -- and Daniel Lockhart -- son of Cubs scout and former Major Leaguer Keith Lockhart.

Add to that the Brenly connection -- father Bob is the popular TV analyst while son Michael is a Single-A catcher -- and the Cubs truly have something unique.

The 2012 Convention came to a close at the Hilton in Chicago with an hour-long session on the father-son connection within the organization.

"A father and son playing catch together is a longstanding tradition in baseball," host Wayne Messmer said. "It doesn't always turn out where either play pro ball. In this case, we have three cases where both played pro ball."

Bob is the more traveled of the fathers, having played nine seasons in the MLB with the Giants and Blue Jays before retiring and becoming a coach. His first year as a manager came in 2001 with the Arizona Diamondbacks, who topped the New York Yankees for the World Series title.

Michael was 15 at the time and served as the team's bat boy during that postseason.

"Obviously, being in the game of baseball, your ultimate goal is to win the World Series, either as a player or a coach, a scout, a manager," the elder Brenly said. "It was great for Michael to be able to be a part of that."

Bob used the opportunity as a teaching lesson for his teenage son.

"Michael was around for all seven games of the 2001 World Series," he said. "We went to his teachers a week before to get his homework assignments and he had to complete them all before the World Series started or he didn't get to be the bat boy.

"There's a price to pay to be around the Major League clubhouse. I've always felt it's a real privilege to put on a Major League uniform and walk into that clubhouse. If I didn't think that he had the proper respect and knew his place around the team, I probably wouldn't have let him."

Michael, who was drafted by the Cubs in the 36th round of the '08 draft, decided to follow in his father's footsteps in becoming a catcher, but the 25-year-old is not living in his dad's shadow.

"Anybody who has a 'famous' father or mother, there's certain expectations. For some people, that's a tall mountain to climb, even when the father is a .249 career hitter like me," Bob deadpanned.

"Michael has done very well for himself. I think he would be where he is if his name was Jones or Smith or whatever."

Keith didn't spend his playing career in Chicago, either, but he did play alongside a Cubs icon for several years. Just before the start of the 1997 season, Lockhart was traded from the Royals to Atlanta, where he joined the likes of Greg Maddux in the midst of the Braves' dynasty.

While the other two fathers had a hand in helping advance their son's careers, Keith was directly responsible for actually getting Daniel's professional career started. The Cubs scout was asked to write a report on his own son and the organization wound up selecting the young infielder in the 10th round. It was Keith's first-ever draft pick.

"It was really different," Keith said. "I was on both sides of the fence as a dad and a scout."

Shawon, Sr. is the only one of the three fathers to have been on the Cubs during their playing days and he was a fan favorite during his 11 years on the North Side.

The Cubs made the high-energy shortstop their first overall pick in the 1982 draft. It was because of that opportunity that his son signed with the organization almost three decades later.

The Dunstons had a choice after Shawon, Jr. was drafted -- either send him to college at Vanderbilt or release him into the world of professional baseball. A 1.275 million signing bonus helped sway the family.

Shawon, Sr. admitted the only two teams his son would have skipped college for were the Cubs and Giants, where the elder Dunston currently works as a special assistant.

"I'm very hard on my son," Shawon, Sr. said. "In high school, he had to maintain a 3.5 GPA. If he had a 3.4, he didn't play. He doesn't understand right now, but I tell him 'you'll hate me now, but you'll love me later.'"

If Shawon, Jr. makes good on his potential, that fatherly advice could go a long way.

Morning Update: Cubs tie up World Series with Game 2 win; Bulls begin season against Celtics

Morning Update: Cubs tie up World Series with Game 2 win; Bulls begin season against Celtics

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Cubs offense settling into World Series groove

Cubs offense settling into World Series groove

CLEVELAND - It doesn't take long for the 2016 Cubs to rebound.

Their American League-style lineup is just simply too talented to keep down for an extended period of time, especially with Kyle Schwarber now added back into the fold.

They Cubs hitters are so confident, they even left Progressive Field feeling good about themselves despite being shut out in Game 1 of the World Series.

The Cubs got on the board early Wednesday night, plating a run on the third batter of the game as Anthony Rizzo doubled home Kris Bryant.

"Take the momentum away. Take the crowd out of it," Bryant said. "It's nice to score first. Especially when you're the visiting team, to get out there and score within the first three batters is huge."

The early lead helped the lineup settle in and keep their foot on the gas for a 5-1 victory to take the series back to Wrigley Field tied one game apiece.

"Especially with a young lineup, I think when you see a few guys go up there and take some good quality at-bats, one happens after the other and the other guys seem to do the same thing," Ben Zobrist said. "It takes a lot of pressure off. When you see other guys having good, quality at-bats, you don't feel like you have to take pitches and you can be aggressive early on. 

"Oftentimes when you're aggressive in the zone is when you take the tough ones. We did a good job tonight laying off some good pitches. When they made mistakes in the zone, we really hit the ball hard. Even though we scored five runs, obviously we had a lot of baserunners on and we could've scored a lot more."

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Zobrist has a point.

The night after leaving nine runners on base and going 1-for-11 with runners in scoring position, the Cubs left 13 runners on base and tallied just three hits in 12 tries with runners in scoring position.

Between nine hits and eight walks, there were Cubs on base all game. Indians pitchers didn't retire Cubs hitters in order in an inning until the seventh.

The Cubs also forced the Indians to throw 196 pitches in nine innings and worked starter Trevor Bauer to 51 pitches through the first two frames.

"That was good for us," Bryant said. "We saw a lot of their bullpen, so we have a lot of information to learn from and hopefully use in the next game."

Anthony Rizzo summed up the lineup's mentality simply:

"Grind out at-bats, work the pitcher's pitch count up and get the next guy up," he said.

That "pass the baton" mentality is what drives this offense and after a brief lull in that regard in Los Angeles when they were shut out in back-to-back games in the NLCS, the Cubs leave Cleveland feeling pretty good.

"When we're able to [get pitch counts up], you can kinda feel it - our offense really feeds off of that," Zobrist said. "We believe that we're going to break through eventually."