For Cubs, Marshall has the right stuff

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For Cubs, Marshall has the right stuff

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011Posted: 3:30 p.m.

By PatrickMooney
CSNChicago.com CubsInsider Follow @CSNMooney
ST. LOUIS Sean Marshall isnt eccentric. He doesnt have a mohawk. He doesnt act like he just pounded four cans of Red Bull. Someday, somewhere, he still might have the right stuff to be a closer.

Nothing seems to surprise or bother Marshall, and thats important when you play for this team in this market.

Marshall has survived the boom-and-bust periods of Cubs baseball. Hes pitched for Dusty Baker and Lou Piniella. Hes played with Greg Maddux and Mark Prior, Milton Bradley and Carlos Zambrano. Hes finished in last place and first place.

At the age of 29, nearing the end of his ninth season in the organization, Marshall has developed into an All-Star-caliber reliever, someone the young pitchers in the bullpen gravitate toward.

You got to have a level head, Marshall said. You cant let your surroundings effect the way you feel out there. As loud as the crowd is, then you just have to worry about making that pitch and not getting flustered, not getting rattled.

When those things happen, the game speeds up. Then you start rushing and leave pitches up in the strike zone.

With that sense of calm, the 6-foot-7-inch left-hander entered Sunday with a 0.91 ERA in his last 32 games. In 75 innings, he had 77 strikeouts and 17 walks. Overall, hes 6-6 with a 2.28 ERA in what could be a breakthrough season.

There isnt a closer controversy yet. But it will be a long winter and the next general manager will have to take a serious look at Carlos Marmol, how good hes been in the past and what went wrong in 2011.

Because the Cubs thought their rebuilt bullpen would be a game-changer this season. Their relievers began Sunday with a 3.52 ERA that was more than a run lower than their 4.55 ERA last season. Only the bullpens in Arizona (3.665.74) and Milwaukee (3.344.47) have shown greater improvement.

But while the Diamondbacks and Brewers have celebrated clinching division titles, the Cubs woke up on Sunday morning with a hangover from Marmols 10th blown save. It unraveled the day before with three straight walks and a wild pitch in a 2-1 loss to the Cardinals.

Its tough to watch, Marshall said. I want to be out there helping, but I know that hes been one of the best in the business for a couple years now. He knows what hes got to do.

Its just a matter of putting yourself back on track and finishing up the last couple games strong. (Its) keeping a nice, good mental approach into the offseason, to be ready to come back and redeem yourself next year.

Jim Hendry gave Marmol a three-year, 20 million contract at the start of spring training. The move was widely praised as a sensible way to buy out a year of free agency and reward a homegrown player.

To that point, Marmol had converted 49-of-54 save opportunities which translates to a 91 percent success rate since taking over as Cubs closer in August 2009. Of all the things that have happened during this lost season, no one saw a Marmol meltdown coming.

The better his command is, the better hell be, manager Mike Quade said. I dont think hell ever have lights-out command. But the ability to throw the fastball when he needs to for a strike and then do the same with the slider hes done that for several years and we just need to get it back to that.

His stuff can be so devastating. He needs hitters in swing mode. Thats why the value of the fastball for strikes and getting ahead of guys is so big. Because you put a strike on him and now theyve got to consider both pitches. Clubs are forcing him to prove to them that he can throw strikes consistently.

Marmol has gone 34-for-44 in save chances this season. His salary will escalate to 7 million next year and 9.8 million in 2013.

Marshall will earn 3.1 million next season and then be eligible to become a free agent. He loves Chicago and will spend the winter there in the suburban home hes settled into with his family. Hes interested to see what happens next.

I dont know what to expect, Marshall said. Theres going to be some changes. Im sure there will be some new faces up in the front office. But its a business and were employees in the business. They pay us a lot of money to go out and do the best that we can. Thats my plan, whatever job Im in next year, whether its the same or different.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

Catch a glimpse inside 'The Cousin Eddie,' Joe Maddon's tricked-out RV

We finally have a full glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie."

Joe Maddon's luxury RV has been name-dropped ever since before the celebrity manager became embedded forever in Cubs lore.

Theo Epstein and Jed Hoyer tell the story about sitting with Maddon down in Pensacola, Fla., outside the "Cousin Eddie" as the trio discussed Maddon coming to manage the Cubs.

[SHOP: Get your Cubs gear right here] 

Maddon has since mentioned the RV several times as his offseason oasis.

Nearly two-and-a-half years later, we can now catch a glimpse inside the "Cousin Eddie" as Maddon was recently profiled on "Real Sports with Bryant Gumbel:"

The pimped-out RV has four TVs, a fireplace, heated floors, a sweet kitchen with a regular-sized fridge and on and on.

His RV is better than most apartments in Chicago.

Essentially, it's good to be Joe Maddon.

The Maddon profile airs Tuesday night on HBO at 9 p.m. CT.

Check out a full trailer:

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

Why Sammy Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ in candid interview

For more than a decade, Cubs fans probably thought Sammy Sosa could walk on water.

They weren't alone in that respect.

In a recent tell-all interview with Chuck Wasserstrom, Sosa compared himself to Jesus Christ being accused of being a witch when the Cubs icon was asked about being accused of PEDs.

"Chuck, it’s like Jesus Christ when he came to Jerusalem," Sosa says. "Everybody thought Jesus Christ was a witch (laughing) – and he was our savior. So if they talk (poop) about Jesus Christ, what about me?"

Talk about a God complex.

It's been 10 years since Sosa last suited up in the big leagues — and 13 years since his Cubs career ended — but the slugger is still just as polarizing as ever in the candid interview. Wasserstrom was let go by Theo Epstein and the Cubs in 2012 after spending 24 years in the organization in the media relations and baseball information departments.

[RELATED - Between Cubs' victory lap and Hall of Fame vote, Sammy Sosa barely staying in the picture]

Sosa talks a lot about his pride and it's very clear from his answers about coming back to Chicago and being a part of the current Cubs product that his pride is a major factor steering his ship even still.

He even drops a line in there:

"When nobody knew who Chicago was, I put Chicago on the map."

I'm not sure exactly what he means by that, to be honest. I would venture almost everybody in the world knew what Chicago was before 1992. It is the third biggest city in America.

If he means the Cubs, well, the Cubs were Lovable Losers and a draw for so many people well before Sosa got there. 

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Of course, Sosa did do some absolutely incredible things for the Cubs and the entire game of baseball. Many believe he and Mark McGwire helped put baseball on the map again in a resurgent 1998 season that helped make the strike of 1994/95 an afterthought. Count me among that group, as well.

He deserves all the credit in the world. People would show up to Wrigley just to see Sosa run out to the right field bleachers and camera bulbs flashed by the thousands every single time he came up to the plate for the better part of a decade. Waveland was sometimes so packed with ballhawks that there wouldn't be room to walk.

I also agree wholeheartedly with Sosa when he says, "you're never going to see the show Mark [McGwire] and I put on [again]." He's right. That was an event that transfixed the nation and will absolutely be something I tell my kids and grandkids and — hopefully — my greatgrandkids about.

Sosa continued to push the onus of any possible reunion with the Cubs on the orgainzation, saying he would absolutely say "yes" if they ever extended an invite to join Wrigley Field.

But he wants to do it "in style."

"If one day they want to do something, I want to do it in style. If it’s going to happen, it’s got to be the right way. Don’t worry, one day they’re going to do it. I’m not in a rush.”

Sosa also said he would rather have all the money — he earned more than $124 million in his career — than be in the Hall of Fame.

Go read the entire interview with Wasserstrom. It's as transparent as you'll see Sosa, especially nowadays.