For Cubs, Marshall has the right stuff

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For Cubs, Marshall has the right stuff

Sunday, Sept. 25, 2011Posted: 3:30 p.m.

By PatrickMooney
CSNChicago.com CubsInsider Follow @CSNMooney
ST. LOUIS Sean Marshall isnt eccentric. He doesnt have a mohawk. He doesnt act like he just pounded four cans of Red Bull. Someday, somewhere, he still might have the right stuff to be a closer.

Nothing seems to surprise or bother Marshall, and thats important when you play for this team in this market.

Marshall has survived the boom-and-bust periods of Cubs baseball. Hes pitched for Dusty Baker and Lou Piniella. Hes played with Greg Maddux and Mark Prior, Milton Bradley and Carlos Zambrano. Hes finished in last place and first place.

At the age of 29, nearing the end of his ninth season in the organization, Marshall has developed into an All-Star-caliber reliever, someone the young pitchers in the bullpen gravitate toward.

You got to have a level head, Marshall said. You cant let your surroundings effect the way you feel out there. As loud as the crowd is, then you just have to worry about making that pitch and not getting flustered, not getting rattled.

When those things happen, the game speeds up. Then you start rushing and leave pitches up in the strike zone.

With that sense of calm, the 6-foot-7-inch left-hander entered Sunday with a 0.91 ERA in his last 32 games. In 75 innings, he had 77 strikeouts and 17 walks. Overall, hes 6-6 with a 2.28 ERA in what could be a breakthrough season.

There isnt a closer controversy yet. But it will be a long winter and the next general manager will have to take a serious look at Carlos Marmol, how good hes been in the past and what went wrong in 2011.

Because the Cubs thought their rebuilt bullpen would be a game-changer this season. Their relievers began Sunday with a 3.52 ERA that was more than a run lower than their 4.55 ERA last season. Only the bullpens in Arizona (3.665.74) and Milwaukee (3.344.47) have shown greater improvement.

But while the Diamondbacks and Brewers have celebrated clinching division titles, the Cubs woke up on Sunday morning with a hangover from Marmols 10th blown save. It unraveled the day before with three straight walks and a wild pitch in a 2-1 loss to the Cardinals.

Its tough to watch, Marshall said. I want to be out there helping, but I know that hes been one of the best in the business for a couple years now. He knows what hes got to do.

Its just a matter of putting yourself back on track and finishing up the last couple games strong. (Its) keeping a nice, good mental approach into the offseason, to be ready to come back and redeem yourself next year.

Jim Hendry gave Marmol a three-year, 20 million contract at the start of spring training. The move was widely praised as a sensible way to buy out a year of free agency and reward a homegrown player.

To that point, Marmol had converted 49-of-54 save opportunities which translates to a 91 percent success rate since taking over as Cubs closer in August 2009. Of all the things that have happened during this lost season, no one saw a Marmol meltdown coming.

The better his command is, the better hell be, manager Mike Quade said. I dont think hell ever have lights-out command. But the ability to throw the fastball when he needs to for a strike and then do the same with the slider hes done that for several years and we just need to get it back to that.

His stuff can be so devastating. He needs hitters in swing mode. Thats why the value of the fastball for strikes and getting ahead of guys is so big. Because you put a strike on him and now theyve got to consider both pitches. Clubs are forcing him to prove to them that he can throw strikes consistently.

Marmol has gone 34-for-44 in save chances this season. His salary will escalate to 7 million next year and 9.8 million in 2013.

Marshall will earn 3.1 million next season and then be eligible to become a free agent. He loves Chicago and will spend the winter there in the suburban home hes settled into with his family. Hes interested to see what happens next.

I dont know what to expect, Marshall said. Theres going to be some changes. Im sure there will be some new faces up in the front office. But its a business and were employees in the business. They pay us a lot of money to go out and do the best that we can. Thats my plan, whatever job Im in next year, whether its the same or different.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs pay their respects to Vin Scully at Dodger Stadium

Cubs pay their respects to Vin Scully at Dodger Stadium

LOS ANGELES – There will never be another Vin Scully, who joined the Dodgers in Brooklyn as a kid out of Fordham University, moved to Los Angeles and became a face of the franchise, doing the one-man show that still connects and entertains generations of baseball fans.

The Cubs paid their respects to the legendary broadcaster before Friday night’s game at Dodger Stadium, with manager Joe Maddon and catcher David Ross visiting the Vin Scully Press Box for another photo op before the lyrical voice retires at the end of this season, at the age of 88.

“You’re ascending into the clouds to meet Mr. Scully,” Maddon said. “That’s like the window to the world up there when you sit in his booth and he talks about the purple mountain majesties on a clear day beyond the outfield fences here.”

The Cubs presented Scully with a green “67” scoreboard panel – to mark the number of seasons he’s worked Dodger games – as well as a Dodger banner from Wrigley Field. Maddon also gave Scully, who rocks the conservative coat-and-tie look on TV, several T-shirts from his collection, including “Try Not to Suck.”

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Maddon said he told Scully: “Maybe at the end of the year, sitting by your pool with the sandals on, you can put a T-shirt on where no one can see you and just be Vin.”

As the tributes pour in from around baseball, CSN Chicago will carry Scully’s third-inning call live during Sunday’s broadcast from Chavez Ravine.

“He makes you feel like he’s known you for the last 50 years,” Maddon said. “Just really kind and gracious. And you have to be all of that to survive that many years. Besides being good, it’s his authenticity and how he interacts with people that really (keeps) you on that stage that long.”

Watch: Ben Zobrist belts 'Let It Go' at Disneyland

Watch: Ben Zobrist belts 'Let It Go' at Disneyland

In case you were wondering whether Ben Zobrist knows all the words to "Let It Go," he does.

The Cubs' All-Star second baseman spent at least part of the team's off day with his family at Disneyland, and he posted this Instagram video of him and his daughter screaming along to the song from the movie "Frozen."

Check it out:

Some great family time for Zobrist. His wife has a challenger for the family's best singer. But not really.

CSN to feature one inning of Vin Scully during Sunday's Cubs-Dodgers game

CSN to feature one inning of Vin Scully during Sunday's Cubs-Dodgers game

Baseball fans are in for a treat when they tune in to CSN for Sunday's Cubs-Dodgers broadcast.

CSN will carry the live audio call for one inning of Los Angeles Dodgers legendary broadcaster Vin Scully's final Cubs-Dodgers game. CSN will have the SportsNet LA audio feed with Scully's live game call during the third inning.

[MORE: Cubs pay their respects to Vin Scully at Dodger Stadium]

Scully, in his 67th and final year of calling Dodgers games, has earned multiple awards during his career including the Ford C. Frick Award for broadcasting excellence, a Lifetime Achievement Emmy Award, induction into the National Radio Hall of Fame, along with a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Leading up to Sunday's telecast, fans are encouraged to post their favorite memories of Scully by using #VinOnCSN on Twitter. CSN will also feature a select number of tweets on air during the telecast.

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In honor of #VinOnCSN, check out Scully's iconic speech from "Field of Dreams" in the video below.