Cubs reloading with Pena, Garza, Wood


Cubs reloading with Pena, Garza, Wood

Friday, March 11, 2011Posted: 7:30 PM
By Patrick Mooney

GLENDALE, Ariz. In nine words, Ryan Dempster summed up the entire Cubs-White Sox experience: Was that for the BP Unleaded Cup or something?

Dempsters young son was running around the clubhouse while his father spoke to the media. Outside, Carlos Pena slammed what looked like an oversized medicine ball into the ground, working out his abdominals. By the time Pena was done, he looked like he just got out of a swimming pool.

All this happened during Fridays 4-3 win over the White Sox, before the outcome was decided in front of 11,599 fans at Camelback Ranch.

The Cubs are three weeks away from Opening Day. Its more than three months until they play the White Sox in a game that matters. These two teams compete for eyeballs, advertising money and your entertainment dollar, not to mention the fights in the stands.

I heard this is like a real hard-core type of rivalry, Pena said. Its cool. As long as its all in fun, rivalries are a blast.

This winter the White Sox pushed their major-league payroll toward 125 million. They brought back World Series heroes Paul Konerko and A.J. Pierzynski. They signed Adam Dunn. They remade their bullpen. They declared peace between Ozzie Guillen and Kenny Williams.

While the White Sox made waves of headlines, the Cubs slowly, quietly shopped on a budget, addressing their three offseason needs. The Cubs have committed around 133 million for 2011, which roughly represents a 10 percent drop from the year before.

These are the three big ideas that could help bring the buzz back to the North Side.
Rebuilding Carlos Pena

In January Pena flew to Dallas to work with hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo and put last seasons .196 average in the past. Penas now up to .200 this spring after hitting his first homer on Friday off left-hander Mark Buehrle, a good sign for a player who might have a tendency to over-analyze things.

As hitters, we have to be very careful with the way we evaluate ourselves, Pena said. That can really harm us if we focus on the wrong thing. Instead, I like to think about: How did I execute my approach? If thats a check mark and Im happy with it, then I have to pat myself on the back and build from it.

Since coming over from Tampa Bay, Pena has won over teammates with his leadership, something Derrek Lee showed more behind-the-scenes. The Cubs prioritized defense, which is the only knock on Dunn, and for one year they will take a long look at Pena.

He plays a really, really good first base, Dempster said. He talks a lot over there, lets you know where hes at. Hes just a great energy (guy) to have around the (clubhouse). He works extremely hard. Hes going to be a big addition for us. We lose one Gold Glover, but we get another one back.

Channeling Matt Garzas adrenaline

Matt Garza got so hyped up during Wednesdays meaningless exhibition game that Pena felt compelled to come over and try to calm him down. So imagine what Garza will be like before his first start against the White Sox this summer.

Because Garza is working on his fastball location, he doesnt put much stock in his 14.85 ERA thus far. The Cubs were impressed by the toughness he showed last week after absorbing a line drive and continuing to pitch.

The Cubs could be open to a long-term extension with Garza, who is comfortable here and building his relationship with pitching coach Mark Riggins.

Its still a learning curve, Garza said. Three starts (Riggins is) not going to be able to break you down right then and there. Its going to take a couple months. Its just like when you guys got your first job: Yeah, you get comfortable in three weeks, but youre not going to know everybody the first month.

Right now were just kind of feeling each other out. Im more open and I like to talk and I like to find out whats going on. Id like to hear his opinion and he knows that.

Reinventing Kerry Wood

The Cubs tell themselves that one of Ron Santos final gifts was bringing Kerry Wood back home to Chicago, a reunion that began at a funeral.

Growing up in Texas, Andrew Cashner and James Russell idolized Wood. As advertised, he has been a resource to the young pitchers, and a feel-good story for Cubs fans. But the dude can still pitch.

Its kind of like golf when you havent played for awhile, Wood said. You go out and the first front nine you shoot great, your swings great. (Then) you try to add a little bit to it and it falls apart. I hope the latter part doesnt happen, but its kind of been like that coming out of the gate. (Its) just throwing strikes and hitting spots, (trying) to calm (things) down and stay smooth.

Wood, who will turn 34 in June, has struck out eight hitters through his first four innings. Hes shown some nasty breaking stuff and unveiled a relatively new pitch.

The addition of the cutter and a damn good one, manager Mike Quade said. Wow.

Wood seems to enjoy not being the absolute center of attention anymore, on a team thats happy to let the White Sox manage runaway preseason expectations.

PatrickMooney is's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Morning Update: Cubs tie up World Series with Game 2 win; Bulls begin season against Celtics

Morning Update: Cubs tie up World Series with Game 2 win; Bulls begin season against Celtics

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Cubs offense settling into World Series groove

Cubs offense settling into World Series groove

CLEVELAND - It doesn't take long for the 2016 Cubs to rebound.

Their American League-style lineup is just simply too talented to keep down for an extended period of time, especially with Kyle Schwarber now added back into the fold.

They Cubs hitters are so confident, they even left Progressive Field feeling good about themselves despite being shut out in Game 1 of the World Series.

The Cubs got on the board early Wednesday night, plating a run on the third batter of the game as Anthony Rizzo doubled home Kris Bryant.

"Take the momentum away. Take the crowd out of it," Bryant said. "It's nice to score first. Especially when you're the visiting team, to get out there and score within the first three batters is huge."

The early lead helped the lineup settle in and keep their foot on the gas for a 5-1 victory to take the series back to Wrigley Field tied one game apiece.

"Especially with a young lineup, I think when you see a few guys go up there and take some good quality at-bats, one happens after the other and the other guys seem to do the same thing," Ben Zobrist said. "It takes a lot of pressure off. When you see other guys having good, quality at-bats, you don't feel like you have to take pitches and you can be aggressive early on. 

"Oftentimes when you're aggressive in the zone is when you take the tough ones. We did a good job tonight laying off some good pitches. When they made mistakes in the zone, we really hit the ball hard. Even though we scored five runs, obviously we had a lot of baserunners on and we could've scored a lot more."

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Zobrist has a point.

The night after leaving nine runners on base and going 1-for-11 with runners in scoring position, the Cubs left 13 runners on base and tallied just three hits in 12 tries with runners in scoring position.

Between nine hits and eight walks, there were Cubs on base all game. Indians pitchers didn't retire Cubs hitters in order in an inning until the seventh.

The Cubs also forced the Indians to throw 196 pitches in nine innings and worked starter Trevor Bauer to 51 pitches through the first two frames.

"That was good for us," Bryant said. "We saw a lot of their bullpen, so we have a lot of information to learn from and hopefully use in the next game."

Anthony Rizzo summed up the lineup's mentality simply:

"Grind out at-bats, work the pitcher's pitch count up and get the next guy up," he said.

That "pass the baton" mentality is what drives this offense and after a brief lull in that regard in Los Angeles when they were shut out in back-to-back games in the NLCS, the Cubs leave Cleveland feeling pretty good.

"When we're able to [get pitch counts up], you can kinda feel it - our offense really feeds off of that," Zobrist said. "We believe that we're going to break through eventually."