Cubs settle on Listach as Quade's bench coach

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Cubs settle on Listach as Quade's bench coach

Monday, Nov. 1, 2010
Updated 6:19 PM

By Patrick MooneyCSNChicago.com

Pat Listach is leaving the Washington Nationals major-league staff to rejoin the Cubs as Mike Quades bench coach, sources confirmed Monday.

Listach enjoyed a more decorated playing career he was the American Leagues Rookie of the Year in 1992 but his development background is similar to Quades in a sense. Listach was Washingtons third-base coach the past two years and previously spent nine seasons as a coach or manager in the Cubs system.

Listach managed at Double-A Tennessee and Triple-A Iowa after playing six seasons with the Milwaukee Brewers and Houston Astros. The 43-year-old is well-regarded by Cubs general manager Jim Hendry for his work at those minor-league affiliates.

The promotion of Quade a third-base coach who also once managed in Des Moines began in Washington and in late August it looked like Listach could be a candidate for a bigger job.

Quade frequently deflected credit for the teams 24-13 finish to his coaching staff and it will remain almost entirely intact for 2011.

Pitching coach Larry Rothschild and hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo were already under contract for next season. Ivan DeJesus and Bob Dernier are expected to coach third and first base and Lester Strode will be back as bullpen coach.

Last week Alan Trammell the Cubs bench coach since 2007 agreed to take the same job with the Arizona Diamondbacks and work for his good friend Kirk Gibson. Trammell tried to teach Starlin Castro and that figures to be a project for Listach, who last year worked extensively with another rookie shortstop in Ian Desmond.

That leaves only one opening on the Cubs coaching staff the special assistant role held by Matt Sinatro, who spent 15 seasons with Lou Piniella and will not return next year. Though Ryne Sandberg has been promised a position within the organization if he wants it it wont be as a major-league coach.

A Cubs spokesman declined to comment on the Listach hire. Major League Baseball prefers that teams do not make announcements during the World Series.

But the Cubs will make news this week as Hendry and the rest of the baseball operations department assembles in Arizona for organizational meetings. On Tuesday Mesa residents will vote on Proposition 420, which would enable the city to spend close to 100 million on a new spring-training facility for the Cubs.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Carl Edwards Jr. couldn't dream up a better pitcher to try to emulate than Mariano Rivera.

Not for a young right-hander who is still getting used to being a reliever with a cutter as his bread and butter pitch.

After picking up his first career save late in 2016, Edwards mentioned how he has been watching video of Rivera. At the Cubs Convention earlier this month, Edwards name-dropped Rivera again in response to a fan question and went into more detail with exactly what he's aiming to accomplish by watching Rivera tape.

Let's be clear: Mariano Rivera is inimitable. He's a once-in-a-lifetime talent and there almost assuredly will never be a better closer in Major League Baseball.

But Edwards knows that. 

"He's great. He's a Hall of Famer," Edwards said. "He goes out there like he has the world in the palm of his hand. He's very competitive; I've never seen him back down. That's one [takeaway] for myself — I'm gonna go out and never back down.

"I don't really get into trying to be like him. I just look more into how he goes about his business. That's something that I can control — how I go about my business."

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Cubs coach Mike Borzello was there with Rivera in 1997 when the now-legendary cutter was born.

It's not fair to compare Edwards' cutter to one of the greatest pitches ever, but his version is pretty nasty in its own right:

The Cubs are still searching for long-term answers in the rotation, but don't have any intentions of moving Edwards back to a role as a starter.

Like Edwards, Rivera began his career as a starting pitcher coming up through the Yankees system. But Edwards actually has a leg up on baseball's all time saves leader: Edwards' first save came in his age 24 season while Rivera didn't tally his first save until age 26 in New York.

Edwards also struck out 13 batters per nine innings in 2016 while Rivera never posted eye-popping whiff totals (a career 8.2 K/9 rate).

As Edwards gets set for what he and the Cubs hope will be his first full season in the big leagues in 2017, his maturation will be important in an age of baseball where relief pitchers have never been more valued.

Rivera pitched in the playoffs nearly every year, routinely working more than one inning and posting ridiculous postseason numbers: 0.70 ERA, 0.759 WHIP and 42 saves while taking home the World Series MVP in 1999 and ALCS MVP in 2003.

The Cubs hope Edwards will be pitching in the postseason on a regular basis, too.

For now, the 25-year-old is still reveling in the glory following the 2016 Cubs championship.

He served as honorary drummer at the Carolina Panthers game in November.

"That was pretty amazing. That's a highlight of my offseason," Edwards said.

He grew up as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan despite being a South Carolina native, but Edwards said he did get a pair of Cam Newton cleats to wear for 2017 when he and Cubs teammates like Addison Russell or Matt Szczur throw the football around in the outfield to get loose.

Edwards was also blown away by the reception from Cubs fans at the Convention — "This is my third year and every year as been better" — but still hasn't fully wrapped his mind around the ending of the 108-year drought.

"Everything happened so quick," he said. "Hopefully in the next couple weeks when I have a break, I can sit down and soak it all in."

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

The sports world woke up to some tragic news on Sunday morning.

Former major leaguer Andy Marte and Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura were both killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic within an hour of each other, according to multiple reports. A Royals representative confirmed the death of 25-year-old Ventura.

The Cubs and White Sox took to Twitter to give their condolences:

Ventura was a member of the Royals from 2013-16 and won a World Series title in 2015 with Ben Zobrist and Wade Davis, who the Cubs acquired this offseason for Jorge Soler. Ventura also played with White Sox pitcher James Shields in 2013-14.

Marte, 33, played a majority of his seven-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He was teammates with Todd Hollandsworth (Atlanta 2005), Kerry Wood (Cleveland 2009-10), and Miguel Montero (Arizona 2014).