Chicago Cubs

Cubs, Soler expected to agree to deal

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Cubs, Soler expected to agree to deal

The Cubs are not only the frontrunners for Jorge Soler, it now appears they have come to an agreement with the 19-year-old Cuban outfielder and are expected to sign him when his pending free agency becomes official.

Dave van Dyck of the Chicago Tribune cites reports out of the Dominican Republic, where Soler is currently staying after defecting from Cuba.

Paperwork is holding Soler's free agent status up, as the outfielder is still waiting for clearance from the MLB.

Yoenis Cespedes, the top Cuban prize this offseason, signed with the Oakland Athletics earlier on Monday. The Cubs inked Gerardo Concepcion, the consensus No. 3 ranked Cuban prospect of the offseason, to a deal a week-and-a-half ago.

Soler's deal is for a reported 27.5 million for three or four years.

That is very curious considering he is likely a couple years away from having an impact on the MLB team. Cespedes' deal was worth just 36 million over four years, and he's 26 and should be ready to be an everyday player for the A's big league club by midseason.

Obviously, nothing is set in stone with Soler until pen actually hits paper. There's no telling exactly how long the clearance will take from the league, but it should only be a matter of days.

BaseballProspectus' Kevin Goldstein weighed in on the matter on Twitter Monday night:

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Kevin GoldsteinFolks, the four year deal for Soler is DIFFERENT from the Cespedes deal. Service time won't start until big leagues, NOT a FA after the 4.
Feb 14 via TweetDeck Favorite Retweet Reply

Which means since he will have to spend a significantly longer time in the minors, Soler won't become a free agent at the end of four years like Cespedes will.

Goldstein also said if the reports are true, Soler would become the new No. 1 prospect in the Cubs organization.

Breaking down how Cubs look at the Justin Verlander situation

Breaking down how Cubs look at the Justin Verlander situation

Theo Epstein’s embrace-debate management style means the Cubs are constantly running through different scenarios, trying to balance their win-now urges against what should be a very bright future in Wrigleyville.

The financials, the human intelligence and the analytics are all factored into the equation, which leads to this question for Epstein’s cabinet: Is there a point where the Detroit Tigers kick in enough money and the prospect cost becomes so low that Justin Verlander makes sense for the Cubs?

The Cubs haven’t definitively answered that question yet or completely ruled out the idea, a team source said Tuesday, cautioning that the defending World Series champs are still more likely to add a reliever before the July 31 trade deadline than acquire a frontline starting pitcher.

“Always looking to make the team better,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 7-2 win over the White Sox kept the Cubs in a virtual first-place tie with the Milwaukee Brewers. “Always. That’s what a GM and a president does. But I like our guys.”  

Verlander would obviously benefit from a move to the National League and feel energized in a pennant race. The Cubs could rationalize this as an immediate boost and a long-range solution while preparing for a 2018 rotation without Jake Arrieta and John Lackey.

Imagine the buzz from Kate Upton’s fiancée walking into the clubhouse and making his first start at Wrigley Field in a Cubs uniform. Verlander and Upton have been spotted enough times at Chicago Cut Steakhouse that his no-trade power might be the easiest hurdle to clear in a deal of this magnitude.

Verlander’s overall numbers are ordinary this season (5-7, 4.50 ERA, 1.444 WHIP), but trending in the right direction. The Cubs would go into it knowing that they wouldn’t get the same guy who won 24 games and American League MVP and Cy Young awards in 2011.

The Tigers also can’t just give away a franchise icon who finished second in last year’s AL Cy Young voting and has a 3.39 ERA in 16 career playoff starts

The Cubs are trying to see around corners and anticipate what the team will look like in 2018 and 2019 – when Verlander will make $28 million guaranteed each season – and what might be available in trades and on the free-agent market during those transaction cycles. Verlander is also owed the balance of his $28 million salary this season and has a $22 million vesting option for 2020.

Even if the Tigers pay down some of that commitment, that’s still a ton of exposure with a guy who has roughly 2,500 innings on his odometer and will be 35 years old around the time pitchers and catchers report to spring training next season. That’s also when the Cubs will begin the second half of Jon Lester’s $155 million megadeal – for his age-34, -35 and -36 seasons.

After stunning the baseball world with that blockbuster White Sox trade during the All-Star break, Epstein talked about how Jose Quintana’s reasonable contract – $8.85 million next season plus team options for 2019 and 2020 worth $22 million combined – creates room for another star player.

As great as Verlander has been throughout his career, are the Cubs really ready to pour that money back into a player who was born in 1983? And meet Detroit’s asking price in terms of prospects?

And go against the buy-low philosophy that attracted the Cubs to Arrieta, as well as the ageism that makes them reluctant to reinvest in their own Cy Young Award winner? And potentially close off opportunities to sign free agents from the monster class coming after the 2018 season?

Probably not, but the Cubs haven’t shut down the Verlander discussion yet.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs even up Crosstown Series with White Sox

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs even up Crosstown Series with White Sox

Danny Parkins (670 The Score), Jordan Bernfield (ESPN) and Mark Potash (Chicago Sun-Times) join Kap to talk Game 2 of the Crosstown Series.

Later, the group previews Bears camp and what's going on with the Cavaliers.

Check out the SportsTalk Live Podcast below: