Cubs will have to pay the price for pitching

722290.png

Cubs will have to pay the price for pitching

Scott Baker missed the entire 2012 season and wont throw from a mound again until the middle of December at the earliest. He couldnt even showcase himself with a bullpen session.

The Cubs still acted fast on Tuesday, guaranteeing Baker 5.5 million with a one-year deal that contains incentives that could yield an extra 1.5 million. That speaks to his reputation with the Minnesota Twins (63-48, 4.15 ERA) before a right elbow injury, the advancements in Tommy John surgery and the rising cost of pitching across an industry juiced by television money.

Baker was too polite to name names or get into other contract offers left on the table. The Cubs are simply going to have to pay this price.

There was definitely some serious interest from some other ballclubs, Baker said. We all know pitching is at a premium and I think youre going to see its going to be a very active offseason for a lot of teams. Im just excited to be here. I think this is an unbelievable opportunity for me and my family.

The Cubs are hoping for more good news after Matt Garza undergoes another scan on his right elbow this week to see how the stress reaction is healing. They still need to sign at least one more starter they can plug into their Opening Day rotation alongside Garza, Baker, Jeff Samardzija and Travis Wood.

Whos on deck for another Wrigley Field news conference? It appears Theo Epsteins front office could go bigger with their next move.

Were pursuing pitchers across the spectrum, Epstein said, some guys who would be classified as buy-low, others that might even be buy-high guys, or hopefully buy-high and stay there. Some one-year deals, some multi-year deals, some trades were looking for pitchers who can step in and improve our rotation.

If there are sound investments out there, whether theyre big or small, well pursue them and try to sign them.

Medical concerns recently helped convince the Cubs to pull the plug on the Carlos Marmol-for-Dan Haren trade with the Los Angeles Angels. The reality is they will likely wind up with another flawed pitcher with upside potential, whether its a Brandon McCarthy, a Shaun Marcum or a Francisco Liriano.

Obviously, youd love to sign pitchers who are 100 percent healthy and have never been hurt, but those animals dont really exist, Epstein said. The medical assessment on every pitcher is important, and if you have to sign a pitcher whos coming off surgery, Tommy John is the one you want, (because) its a very predictable rehab with a very strong success rate upwards of 95 percent.

Baker grew up in Shreveport, La., and went to Oklahoma State University, where he overlapped during the 2001 season with future Boston Red Sox pitching coach (and current manager) John Farrell, at the time an assistant coachpitching and recruiting coordinator for the Cowboys.

The Los Angeles Dodgers just bid 25.7 million for the right to negotiate with South Korean left-hander Ryu Hyun-jin. Zack Greinke and Anibal Sanchez could wind up with nine-figure deals. By the time teams start throwing money around at next months winter meetings in Nashville, Tenn., this could seem even more reasonable.

The reality is its not exactly a buyers market for pitching out there right now, so you have to take your risks, Epstein said. Do you want to take a risk on the guy with bad makeup? Do you want to take a risk on the guy with bad command? Or do you want to take a risk on a guy you really believe in whos coming off Tommy John at an appropriate value point? Were very comfortable placing our bet on Scott Baker.

From top to bottom, Cubs have all the pieces in place, including new deals for Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod

From top to bottom, Cubs have all the pieces in place, including new deals for Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod

CINCINNATI – From top to bottom, the Cubs now have all the pieces in place to make October baseball at Wrigley Field a reality, year after year, with family ownership, rock-star executives and blue-chip players.

“It’s nice to keep the band together,” manager Joe Maddon said, reacting to Friday’s announcement that general manager Jed Hoyer and scouting/player-development chief Jason McLeod had finalized contract extensions, matching up their timelines with team president Theo Epstein’s new monster deal through the 2021 season.

Those architects constructed what’s already a 102-win team, a division champion and the National League’s No. 1 seed, making the Cubs right now the biggest story in baseball, if not professional sports.

The lineup for a 7-3 win over the rebuilding Cincinnati Reds featured two MVP candidates (Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo), a 22-year-old All-Star shortstop (Addison Russell) and marquee free agents (Ben Zobrist, Jason Heyward, Dexter Fowler). The last two games of the regular season at Great American Ball Park will feature Jon Lester and Kyle Hendricks making their final cases for the Cy Young Award. 

“It always starts with ownership and then it goes into the front office and eventually gets to us when you have that kind of stability,” said Maddon, who led a stunning turnaround with the Tampa Bay Rays despite all the uncertainty that came with small-market payrolls, a charmless domed stadium (Tropicana Field) and speculation about relocation and contraction.

 [SHOP: Get your NL Central champions gear right here]  

“We have a great product on the field,” Maddon said. “We have the best ballpark in the world. Our fans are spectacular. The city itself – there’s no more interesting place to live than Chicago. All those factors play into the success.

“I know in the past the Cubs haven’t been as successful as they wanted to be. But I don’t know that all the different ingredients have been put into place this well.

“So looking ahead, you just want to build off what you’ve done. Last year was a good building block coming into this year. And we want to keep moving forward. Of course, our goal is to play the final game of the year and win it. Under these circumstances, I think it becomes more believable on an annual basis.”

Since Epstein, Hoyer and McLeod reunited in the fall of 2011 – updating their World Series blueprints with the Boston Red Sox – the Cubs are just the third team in major-league history to win at least 100 games within four years of a 100-loss season. The Cubs have now qualified for postseason play in consecutive seasons for only the third time in franchise history.

“We had some good pieces,” chairman Tom Ricketts said. “But the organization itself was not in a position where you could believe that there was sustainability and consistency and success on the field. Obviously, Theo and the guys that he brought with him five years ago kind of took the organization down to the studs and started rebuilding.

“The time and energy to do it the right way has paid off with a team that should be successful for years to come.”

Morning Update: Cubs, White Sox cruise to 7-3 victories

Morning Update: Cubs, White Sox cruise to 7-3 victories

Preview: Jon Lester goes for win No. 20 as Cubs battle Reds on CSN

Preview: Patrick Kane to make preseason debut as Blackhawks host Blues on CSN

Fire hope to damage rival Columbus' playoff hopes Saturday on CSN+

No guarantees, but Ben Zobrist believes Cubs can live up to ‘super-team’ hype

Young White Sox players star in win over Twins

Fred Hoiberg wants a more aggressive Bulls defense

Bears facing Lions with Jay Cutler likely out, Alshon Jeffery dealing with hamstring issue

Kyle Baun healthy, ready for another chance with Blackhawks

Week 5 Big Ten previews: Michigan meets Badgers in top-10 showdown

Three keys and prediction: Notre Dame - Syracuse