Chicago Cubs

'Dreams come true': Bill Murray reacts to Cubs winning the World Series

'Dreams come true': Bill Murray reacts to Cubs winning the World Series

CLEVELAND - Theo Epstein blasting Bill Murray in the face with champagne may be the lasting image from the Cubs' clubhouse celebration after winning the World Series.

In part because Bill F---ing Murray never stopped believing.

The legendary comic has endured through thick and thin as a Cubs fan and on the day they finally reached the ultimate glory, Murray was there to celebrate.

Squinting through his champagne-drenched eyes in the Cubs clubhouse at Progressive Field, Murray bounced around the room, celebrating with Epstein and Cubs players and even acting as a reporter for FOX sports, interviewing Epstein and Dexter Fowler, among others.

"It's wonderful," Murray said. "It's fantastic. You believe in something that actually comes true. It's beautiful. You believe in something that was true and beautiful and the whole city, all its fans, they're sort of validated. Their dream came true. 

"It's OK. Dreams come true. People believed in it."

Did Murray ever imagine this would actually happen?

"Oh God yes," he said. "I've been imagining this for a long time. I didn't think it woudl happen in Cleveland, but I thought it would happen. I thought it would happen at Wrigley Field. 

"Just being at Wrigley Field and seeing all that excitement this week and the last few weeks. It's dreamy. It's really pretty cool."

Murray also paid props to Miguel Montero, who drove home the Cubs' eight run in the top of the 10th inning in the early hours of Thursday morning in Game 7.

"Miguel's grand slam home run and there he was again with the bases loaded again tonight," Murray said. "It's like - why do they mess with that guy? He's a BAD dude."

Murray - who was born in Evanston - has been at Wrigley all October and sang "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" at Game 4 of the World Series at Wrigley last weekend. 

He felt the special bond Chicago had with this Cubs team.

"There's a crazy energy about the whole city," Murray said. "I mean, when the lions outside the Art Institute are wearing Cub hats instead of Bear helmets, you know something special is happening. 

"You know there's some sort of magic happening in the city. This was it. This is a long time coming. It's really great."

Murray called Cubs manager Joe Maddon the perfect guy for the job and joked maybe the Cubs would play the White Sox in the World Series next year.

As for the way in which the Cubs clinched, Murray figured it just had to be.

An extra inning affair in Game 7 of the World Series with a rain delay mixed in?

"You know, whenever you pass from one atmosphere to another, there's a lot of energy," Murray said. "It takes a lot of energy to blast a rocket ship up into space. It takes a lot of energy to blast yourself to the World Series. 

"And there's a forcefield you gotta pass through and the Indians put it up. They did it."

Of course, Murray, being a man of the people, also had a message for Cubs fans moving forward:

"The great thing about it is they became such great losers," Murray said. "Good sports, good losers. I just hope we're good winners. I hope we're just as good sports as winners as when we didn't win."

More on the World Series victory

--Joy to the World: Cubs finally end 108-year Series drought

--Finally: The Cubs are World Series champs

--The wait –and the weight- is over: Cubs fans celebrate World Series title

--Barack Obama congratulates Cubs World Series championship

--Famous Cubs fans celebrate World Series title on Twitter

--Ben Zobrist becomes first Cub ever to win World Series MVP

--Numbers game: statistical oddities of the Cubs World Series title

--Jed Hoyer: Rain delay was ‘divine intervention’ for Cubs

​--Fans give Cubs a taste of home in Cleveland

--Ben Zobrist delivers exactly what the Cubs expected with massive World Series

--‘Dreams come true’: Bill Murray reacts to Cubs winning the World Series

--Big surprise: Kyle Schwarber plays hero again for Cubs in World Series Game 7

- Ryne Sandberg: World Series ‘made it able for me to live in the present

Joe Maddon finally sees Cubs playing with the right 'mental energy'

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USA TODAY

Joe Maddon finally sees Cubs playing with the right 'mental energy'

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Joe Maddon looked back on the perfect baseball storm that hit the Tampa Bay Rays and played all the greatest hits for local reporters, waxing poetic about the banners hanging inside Tropicana Field, stumping for a new stadium on the other side of the Gandy Bridge, telling Don Zimmer stories, namedropping Bucs quarterback Jameis Winston and riffing on sabermetrics and information buckets.

But the moment of clarity came in the middle of a media session that lasted 20-plus minutes, Maddon sitting up on stage in what felt like the locker room at an old CYO gym: “We only got really good because the players got really good.”

There’s no doubt the Cubs have the talent to go along with all the other big-market advantages the Rays could only dream about as the have-nots in the American League East. Now it looks like the defending champs have finally got rid of the World Series hangover, playing with the urgency and pitch-to-pitch focus that had been lacking at times and will be needed again in October.    

Maddon essentially admitted it after Tuesday’s 2-1 victory, watching his team beat Chris Archer and work together on a one-hitter that extended the winning streak to seven games and kept the Milwaukee Brewers 3.5 games back in the National League Central.

“You’re really seeing them try to execute in moments,” Maddon said. “When they come back and they don’t get it done, it’s not like they’re angry. But you can just see they’re disappointed in themselves.

“Their mental energy is probably at an all-season-high right now.”

Six days after the Cubs moved him to the bullpen, lefty swingman Mike Montgomery took a no-hitter into the sixth inning, when Tampa Bay’s No. 9 hitter (Brad Miller) drove a ball over the center-field wall. Maddon then went to the relievers he will trust in October – Pedro Strop, Carl Edwards Jr., Wade Davis – with the All-Star closer striking out the side in the ninth inning and remaining perfect in save opportunities (32-for-32) as a Cub.       

“We want to go out there and prove every day that we’re the best team in baseball,” said Kyle Schwarber, the designated hitter who launched Archer’s 96-mph fastball into the right-center field seats for his 28th home run in the second inning. “The way our guys are just going out there and competing, it’s really good to see, especially this time of year. It’s getting to crunch time, and we just got to keep this same pace that we’re going at.

“Don’t worry about things around us. Just keep our heads down, keep worrying about the game and go from there.”     

In what’s been a season-long victory lap, Maddon couldn’t help looking back when the sound system started playing The Beach Boys and “Good Vibrations” echoed throughout the domed stadium, a tribute running on the video board and a crowd of 25,046 giving him a standing ovation.

“It was cool,” Maddon said. “I forgot about the bird, the cockatoo, I can’t remember the name. Really a cool bird. I told (my wife) Jaye I wanted one of those for a while. But then again, she gets stuck taking care of them.

“I was just thinking about all the things we did. You forget sometimes that snake. I think her name was Francine, like a 19-year-old, 20-footer. And then the penguin on my chair. You forget all the goofy stuff you did. But you can see how much fun everybody had.

“I appreciated it. They showed all my pertinent highlights. There’s none actually as a player. It’s primarily as a zookeeper.”

But within the last week, you can see the Cubs getting more serious, concentrating on their at-bats and nailing their pitches. There is internal competition for roster spots and playing time in the postseason, when Maddon becomes ruthless and doesn’t care at all about making friends. This just might be another perfect storm.

Montgomery – who notched the final out in the 10th inning of last year’s World Series Game 7 – put it this way: “I feel ready for anything after how this year’s gone.” 

Are Cubs lining up Jake Arrieta to start Game 1 vs. Nationals?

Are Cubs lining up Jake Arrieta to start Game 1 vs. Nationals?

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. – Are the Cubs lining up Jake Arrieta to start Game 1 against the Washington Nationals?

“I’m not even anywhere near that,” manager Joe Maddon said during Tuesday’s pregame media session with the Chicago media, immediately shifting his focus back to the decisions he would have to make that night – how hard to push catcher Willson Contreras coming off the disabled list, what the Cubs would get out of lefty Mike Montgomery, how the bullpen sets up – against the Tampa Bay Rays.

“Players can do that kind of stuff. I don’t think managers can. Honestly, I don’t want to say I don’t care about that. I just don’t worry about that, because there’s nothing to worry about yet. Because first of all, he’s got to be well when he pitches, too.”

Arrieta had just completed a throwing session at Tropicana Field and declared himself ready to face the Milwaukee Brewers on Thursday at Miller Park. That would be the Cy Young Award winner’s first start since suffering a Grade 1 right hamstring strain on Labor Day. It would set him up to face the St. Louis Cardinals next week at Busch Stadium and start Game 162 against the Cincinnati Reds at Wrigley Field.

“The plan is to be out there Thursday,” said Arrieta, who would be limited to 75-80 pitches against the Brewers and build from there, trying to recapture what made him the National League pitcher of the month for August. “The good thing is the arm strength is there – it’s remained there – and I actually feel better for maybe having a little bit of time off.

“The idea is to be able to be out there the last game against Cincinnati – pretty much at full pitch count – and to be ready for the playoffs.”

Five days after that would be the beginning of the NL divisional round and what could be a classic playoff series between the defending champs and Dusty Baker’s Nationals. The Cubs started Jon Lester in Game 1 for all three playoff rounds during last year’s World Series run and their $155 million ace could open a Washington series with an extra day of rest.

“It’s inappropriate to talk about that now,” team president Theo Epstein said. “We have a lot of work to do, and those would be the guys that would help get us there in the first place. If you’re lucky enough to get into that situation, you’d just use all the factors. You guys all know – who’s going the best, who matches up the best, the most experienced – and we figure it out and go from there. But we’re still a good ways away from figuring that one out.”