The End: Cubs cant see into the future

548100.jpg

The End: Cubs cant see into the future

Box Score
PENA: I'd love to return
READ: Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers
SORIANO: I don't want to be on another losing team
DEMPSTER: It's an end to what's been a rough season

SAN DIEGO They pulled beers from the cooler and stood around the clubhouse, watching the fantastic finishes in Baltimore and Tampa Bay, not wanting to walk out to the bus just yet.

They cheered and screamed at the side-by-side television screens that showed the Red Sox collapsing and the Rays celebrating. No one in the room knew what that meant for their general manager search. But everyone understood that change is coming.

The Cubs knew they werent going to the playoffs months ago. It was a lost summer without much on-field drama or suspense.

Year 103 without a World Series title officially ended inside PETCO Park at 8:13 p.m. Pacific time. The same group that finished at 71-91 after Wednesdays 9-2 loss to the Padres wont be brought back together again.

Another fifth-place finish already cost Jim Hendry his job. It could take down manager Mike Quade and his coaching staff before the next head of baseball operations starts gutting the roster. The blame game will continue in what should be a very long winter.

You can bring here whoever you think the best manager in the big leagues is, Aramis Ramirez said. I dont think its going to be any different. The bottom line is as players we didnt get it done.

The manager doesnt take the field. The players take the field. The numbers dont lie. Go ahead and look at the numbers offensively, defensively, pitching-wise we didnt get it done. The manager had nothing to do with it.

Pitching and defense is supposed to be the name of the game. The Cubs led the majors in errors (134), and their staff never did live up to expectations (4.33 ERA). They didnt hit with runners in scoring position either.

Their rotation couldnt withstand the loss of Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner during the first week of the season. Their roster was paralyzed by the big-money contracts handed out during the final days of the Tribune Co.

The faces of the franchise are about to change.

Ramirez could follow Ozzie Guillen and take his talents to South Beach. Carlos Zambranos collection of bobblehead dolls is already cleared out of the clubhouse, and no one expects to see him pitch for this team again. Alfonso Soriano may have played his final game in a Cubs uniform.

I dont think about it, Soriano said. If they want to trade me, (I) hope they trade me to a good team, a contender. If not, I want to be here. I love it here. It all depends on what they want to do."

The next general manager will probably want to build around Starlin Castro, a 21-year-old All-Star shortstop who finished the season with 207 hits and by reaching base safely in 40 consecutive games. The Hall of Fame requested his jersey from Wednesdays game.

I know I can do better, Castro said.

Besides Castros flashes of brilliance and moments where he totally lost concentration there was the sight of Matt Garza screaming into his glove yet again. And Marlon Byrd kicking his legs into the air after a fastball knocked him to the ground and shattered his face. And Ryan Dempster yelling at Quade from the top step of the dugout.

There was the silence of one of the best-kept secrets in franchise history, Hendry doing his job for almost a month knowing that he was fired. He kept almost the entire team intact at the trade deadline, closed on a draft class that cost almost 12 million and loved calling Zambrano on his retirement bluff.

The Cubs didnt unload Carlos Pena because they wanted the next management team to have the option of re-signing the first baseman, assuming they dont go hard after Albert Pujols or Prince Fielder. Pena watched Wednesdays game thinking this might be the end.

I would be lying if (I said) that didnt go through my mind, Pena said. I try to focus on the fact that I had the privilege of playing for the Cubs. I wore the uniform with a lot of pride and Im very grateful for the opportunity.

I also understand how the business of baseball works and that there are some things the Cubs need to do in the top office. (They) have their hands full (and) I understand that. (I) would love to return. I just really dont know what the future holds.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

This is the identity of the 2017 Cubs so far: 'Up and down, up and down'

This is the identity of the 2017 Cubs so far: 'Up and down, up and down'

MIAMI – The Cubs are the defending champs, but at the moment they really don’t have much of an identity beyond that, unsure what they can count on from one game to the next, waiting to get healthy and still searching for that sense of rhythm 45 percent into the season.

This is a 37-36 team dealing with injuries near the top of the rotation (Kyle Hendricks), the middle of the lineup (Ben Zobrist) and the heart of the defense (Jason Heyward) while a World Series legend (Kyle Schwarber) gets a few days to clear his head before reporting to Triple-A Iowa.

Just when it looks like the rotation is gathering strength, the offense went missing again during Friday’s 2-0 loss at Marlins Park, the night after the Cubs scored 11 runs in Miami and talked about it as the type of game that can create momentum.

“The difference 24 hours can make,” manager Joe Maddon said.

But this has been building for almost three full months. The Cubs have been shut out six times already and at the .500 mark at 15 different points this season.

The good news: John Lackey hit 94 mph and has put together back-to-back quality starts for a starting five with a 2.35 ERA the last two turns through the rotation. The 10 games before that, the Cubs rotation put up a 5.65 ERA, but neither trend has really changed the overall picture in a weak National League Central. 

“That’s where it all starts, for sure,” Lackey said. “If you’re going to be a consistent winning team, you got to have good starting pitching, because the offense can kind of come and go.

“You got to remember they’re pretty young. We got a lot of guys still learning, still making adjustments in the game. But the talent’s there, so you like our chances in the end for those guys to do good stuff.”  

The bad news: Lackey had no margin for error as the Marlins needed only three hits to score two runs (one earned). Lackey gave up his 21st home run – he allowed 23 in almost 190 innings last year – in the third inning when Giancarlo Stanton launched an 83-mph pitch 458 feet beyond the garish pink-flamingos-and-palm-trees sculpture.   

Defense was supposed to be the constant with this team, but the Marlins manufactured an insurance run in the sixth inning when Dee Gordon stole second base off Lackey and catcher Miguel Montero threw the ball away, setting up Christian Yelich’s sacrifice fly.   

“I certainly have all the confidence in the world in everybody here,” reigning NL MVP Kris Bryant said. “Last year was a great year for us. Everybody just seemed to be hitting at the right time, pitching good at the right time. Everything clicked.

“This season hasn’t been that way. You look at many players – and many Hall of Fame players – they’ve had some down years here and there. It just kind of seems like as a group we’re a little down right now, but plenty of time to turn it around.”

Ian Happ and Javier Baez accounted for four of the six hits against right-hander Jose Urena and three different relievers as the Cubs hit into three double plays, struck out seven times and followed the same pattern.  

“Our offense is just like you saw – up and down, up and down,” Maddon said. “It is youthful. Listen, I don’t want to keep saying that, but it’s true. It just is. These guys need more at-bats to figure out what to not swing at and how to battle.”

Joe Maddon on Ian Happ: ‘Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen’

Joe Maddon on Ian Happ: ‘Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen’

MIAMI – The Cubs factored Ian Happ into their preseason plans, hoping he could give the team a shot of adrenaline at some point and play well enough to be marketed as a trade chip in a blockbuster deal for pitching.

But the Cubs couldn’t have projected this for late June: Happ batting third behind Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant, the switch-hitting presence and middle-of-the-order force needed with Ben Zobrist on the disabled list and Kyle Schwarber about to get a mental reset at Triple-A Iowa.

“Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen, when you look at the size and how far the ball goes,” manager Joe Maddon said Friday at Marlins Park. “It’s a unique combination of size and strength. You normally see a bigger guy with that kind of juice."

Happ (6-foot, 205 pounds) also patrolled right field that night – one of four different positions the rookie has handled so far – with Gold Glove defender Jason Heyward also on the disabled list and the Cubs in scramble mode.

The Schwarber demotion is a reminder of how hard this game is, how quickly it can spin out of control and how small sample sizes can be misleading, even on the biggest stages against some of the best pitchers on the planet.

But check out Happ’s first six weeks in The Show projected as a 162-game average on Baseball-Reference.com: 46 homers, 97 RBI, .916 OPS and 199 strikeouts.

“He’s just really interesting,” Maddon said. “Now you’re seeing him hit better from the right side, too, which is really going to matter. That really makes him a threat. You put him in the lineup based on that.”

The shorthanded Cubs have needed Happ – at the age of 22 – to protect Bryzzo Souvenir Co., add another layer of Zobrist versatility and learn it all on the fly for a team with World Series expectations.

“He’s pretty self-confident,” Maddon said. “There’s times I can tell when it’s beating him up a little bit when he goes through some of those funks where maybe he’s chasing pitches out of the zone. But he seems to rebound very quickly. Strong-minded. Strong-willed. Very confident individual.”

[MORE CUBS: Cubs hopeful Kyle Hendricks returns before All-Star break]

Two weeks into Happ’s big-league career, Maddon got questions about how long the Cubs will be patient and what they would need to see out of him before thinking about a return trip to Des Moines.

Though Happ was hitting .207 as recently as last week, his average has jumped roughly 40 points. He’s homered eight times in his last 14 starts. Fifteen of his 21 RBI have come with two outs. His OPS hasn’t fallen below .741 at any point this season.

“That’s adjusting,” Maddon said. “You get here, nobody really knows you, they throw you pitches, you hit ‘em well. And all of a sudden, you stop seeing those pitches. You’re not going to see them again until you stop swinging at the stuff that they want you to swing at.

“He’s done a pretty good job of laying off the bad stuff. That’s why it’s coming back to him. He’s really reorganized the strike zone here.”

That whole process sped up on Schwarber, who lost the swagger and the ability to crush fastballs that made him such a dangerous hitter. Happ doesn’t have it all figured out, but by the look on his face and the sound of his voice, you would have no idea whether or not he’s hitting. 

“Unbelievable guy,” said Happ, who’s tight with Schwarber. “He’ll go down, rake, be back soon and do what he’s capable of doing, which is hitting the ball hard all over the ballpark. He’s done it his whole life. And he’ll continue to do it.”