A fan's take on Cubs' 2012 starting rotation

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A fan's take on Cubs' 2012 starting rotation

The Winter Meetings have come and gone and while it was a very busy week for Theo Epstein and Co., they still have yet to make any changes to the Cubs' pitching staff.

In a conversation last week with one of my friends, Billy (who would like to be described as a "Cubs enthusiast"), we were discussing the potential starting rotation for the Cubs next year.

Jed Hoyer and Theo keep preaching run prevention and the fastest way to improve in that area is to bolster the starting rotation. Theo has already said he wants to have as many as nine starting pitcher options, which makes the five-man rotation hard to predict. Throw in injuries and potential ineffectiveness and it's near impossible.

But we can have fun anyways and still throw out our projections.

As such, here is Cubs Enthusiast Billy's projected Opening Day rotation:

1. Matt Garza
2. Ryan Dempster
3. Paul Maholm
4. Joe Saunders
5. Andrew CashnerRandy Wells

He also believes the "Dream Team" will find a taker for Carlos Zambrano.

It's interesting and entirely possible. Maholm and Saunders are free agent options and they could come somewhat cheap. They're both lefties and it would make sense for the Cubs to target a left-handed starter at some point during this offseason.

The idea of Maholm is certainly intriguing. He's the kind of under-the-radar free agent signing Theo and his posse seem most inclined to make.

Maholm is coming off the best year of his career (3.66 ERA and 1.29 WHIP despite a tough-luck 6-14 record) and could sign a deal worth 5-7 million a year or so. Not too expensive and at 29 years old, the former first-round pick could be a solid addition to the pitching staff.

Saunders, meanwhile, was just non-tendered by the Diamondbacks and has compiled a 4.07 ERA in 415.1 innings over the past two seasons. He did lead the league in losses in 2010 with 17, but he's been a steady and reliable -- if unspectacular -- starter over his career.

Cubs enthusiast Billy also thinks Epstoyer (his celebrity name for the new Cubs front office duo) could go out and sign a guy like Jeff Francis for depth and to help push the younger starters in Spring Training.

Dempster and Garza are both obvious choices to head up the rotation, assuming Garza isn't dealt sometime this winter (which I doubt he will be).

Cashner was sidelined most of 2011 with a shoulder injury, so the organization may not want to stretch him out as a starter at the beginning of the season. Whether they do or not remains to be seen, but even if he is an option for the fifth starter, Wells could be there to push him in the spring.

A very realistic rotation possibility, though. I personally like the Maholm signing. He may not be flashy, but like David DeJesus, he's a guy that will improve the team and help them take steps back into prominence in the NL.

Far better than having Doug Davis making starts, right?
Have a prediction for the Cubs' 2012 starting rotation? Comment in the section below with your projection of the five Opening Day predictions and I'll discuss each and every rotation comment here on CubsTalk.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with Jed Hoyer

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with Jed Hoyer

On the latest edition of the Cubs Talk Podcast, Kelly Crull and Luke Stuckmeyer talk about the first week of spring training. 

The two discuss ace contracts, leadoff intimidation and give their thoughts on the Sammy Sosa saga. 

Plus CSNChicago.com Cubs Insider Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with general manager Jed Hoyer. 

Listen to the Cubs Talk Podcast below. 

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

MESA, Ariz. — Cactus League stats are supposed to be irrelevant, especially for the guy with the biggest contract in franchise history. Jason Heyward already built up a reservoir of goodwill as a former All Star, three-time Gold Glove defender and World Series champion. The intangibles got Heyward $184 million guaranteed, and the Cubs are hoping a new comfort level will lead to a Jon Lester effect in Year 2 of that megadeal.

But Heyward will still be one of the most scrutinized players in Mesa after an offseason overhaul that tried to recapture the rhythm and timing he felt with the 2012 Braves (27 homers) and break some of the bad habits that had slowly crept into his high-maintenance left-handed swing.

"If there's ever any doubt," Heyward said, "then you probably shouldn't be here."

Heyward will be batting leadoff and starting in right field on Saturday afternoon when the Cubs open their exhibition schedule with a split-squad game against the A's at Sloan Park. If Heyward has anything to prove this spring, it's "probably to himself, not to us," general manager Jed Hoyer said, backing a player who does the little things so well and commands respect throughout the clubhouse.

"There's going to be growing pains with making adjustments," Hoyer said. "He'll probably have some good days and some bad days. But I think the most important thing is that he feels comfortable and uses these five weeks to lock in and get ready for the Cardinals."

The Cubs are betting on Heyward's age (27), track record (three seasons where he showed up in the National League MVP voting), understanding of the strike zone (.346 career on-base percentage) and willingness to break down his swing this winter at the team's Arizona complex.

At the same time, Heyward realizes "it's just the offseason" and "a never-ending process in baseball." There are no sweeping conclusions to be made when the opposing starting pitcher showers, talks to the media and leaves the stadium before the game ends.

"I'm not sitting here telling you: 'Oh, I know for sure what's going to happen,'" Heyward said. "I don't know how it's going to go. But I know I did a damn good job of preparing for it."

[MORE CUBS: No hard feelings: Cubs and Pedro Strop look to future with contract extension]

Manager Joe Maddon — who gave Heyward nearly 600 plate appearances to figure it out during the regular season (.631 OPS) before turning him into a part-time outfielder in the playoffs (5-for-48) — usually thinks batting practice is overrated or a waste of time. But at 6-foot-5 — and with so much riding on an offensive resurgence — Heyward is hard to miss.

"I can see it's a lot freer and the ball's coming off hotter," Maddon said. "But it's all about game. I'm really eager for him, because everybody just talks about all the work he's done all winter.

"Conversationally with him, I sense or feel like he feels good about it and that he's kind of at a nice peaceful moment with himself. So it will be really fun to watch."

A 103-win season, an American League-style lineup that scored 808 runs, a new appreciation for defensive metrics and a professional attitude helped provide cover for Heyward, who largely escaped the wrath of Cubs fans with little patience for big-ticket free agents.

"Baseball is a game that's going to humble you every day," Heyward said. "You're going to fail more times than you succeed, so it's all about how you handle it, as an individual and as a group. We handled it the best out of anyone last year as a team. And that's why we were able to win the World Series.

"There's always things you feel like you need to work on. You can ask guys who had the best years — there's always something they're trying to improve on and something they don't feel great about at a certain point in time during the year.

"I just happened to have a little bit more breaking down to do. A lot of things allowed me to just kind of pause (and) look forward and not really think about trying to compete and win a game. Let's just get some work done."