Finally: The Cubs are World Series champions

Finally: The Cubs are World Series champions

CLEVELAND - You've waited your whole life to see these words:

The Chicago Cubs have won the World Series.

The Cubs are champions. 

Let that soak in. For a long while.

The 108-year drought is over.

The moment millions upon millions of people dreamed about for their entire lives is here. It's actually here.

This is not a dream. You are not asleep. 

It just took a little longer.

Well, maybe a LOT longer.

The Cubs were dealt one more blow of gut-wrenching misery when Rajai Davis deposited Aroldis Chapman's 97 mph fastball onto the Home Run Porch in left field to tie the game.

And then extra innings happened.

And then a 17-minute rain delay happened.

And then Kyle Schwarber happened. And Albert Almora Jr. And Ben Zobrist. And Miguel Montero.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

The Cubs had a host of heroes in the top of the 10th inning as they battled for an 8-7 victory in an impossibly thrilling Game 7 that started Wednesday night and stretched into Thursday morning in Cleveland. 

The Cubs pulled the rug out from underneath an Indians team that had built a 3-1 lead in the series.

After all the Cubs fanbase had been through, what a way to end it all: Rallying with their backs against the wall for a Game 7 victory.

Of course it had to be Game 7. Of course it went to extra innings.

Everybody had to know this wasn't going to be easy.

Screw narratives. The five-hour affair that took place at Progressive Field on Nov. 2 and 3 was the greatest baseball game ever played. Don't even try to argue that.

As Wrigleyville hosted the first World Series games on Chicago's North Side since 1945, the anxiety and tension was through the roof. 

That pressure filtered onto the field, where the Cubs dropped the first two games, leaving fans depressed and bewildered Saturday night.

But by the time everybody recovered and woke up Sunday morning, the hope and positivity was back. 

Fans came out in droves to write their wishful thoughts on the brick wall outside Wrigley and everybody watched as the Cubs held off the Indians in a pressure-packed 3-2 victory in Game 5.

That shifted all the pressure onto the Indians, and the Cubs took full advantage.

After a Game 6 throttling, Dexter Fowler got the party in Wrigleyville started early Wednesday night with a solo homer off Corey Kluber to start the game.

The Cubs built out a 5-1 lead before the fifth, but the Indians kept battling back, eventually evening the score in the eighth off Chapman.

After no scoring in the ninth, Kyle Schwarber started out the 10th after a rain delay with a single through the shift.

Almora Jr. pinch-ran for him and tagged up on Kris Bryant's fly ball to the wall in center. Anthony Rizzo was intentionally walked before Zobrist drilled a go-ahead double down the left-field line.

Montero later added the game-winning single through the drawn-in infield for insurance.

Rookie Carl Edwards Jr. recorded the first two outs in the ninth inning before surrendering a walk and an RBI single by Davis. Mike Montgomery came in to nail down the save by retiring Michael Martinez.

What a game. 

What an ending. 

What a season.

See you all at the parade in Chicago.

It's gonna be lit.

More on the World Series victory

--Joy to the World: Cubs finally end 108-year Series drought

--Finally: The Cubs are World Series champs

--The wait –and the weight- is over: Cubs fans celebrate World Series title

--Barack Obama congratulates Cubs World Series championship

--Famous Cubs fans celebrate World Series title on Twitter

--Ben Zobrist becomes first Cub ever to win World Series MVP

--Numbers game: statistical oddities of the Cubs World Series title

--Jed Hoyer: Rain delay was ‘divine intervention’ for Cubs

​--Fans give Cubs a taste of home in Cleveland

--Ben Zobrist delivers exactly what the Cubs expected with massive World Series

--‘Dreams come true’: Bill Murray reacts to Cubs winning the World Series

--Big surprise: Kyle Schwarber plays hero again for Cubs in World Series Game 7

- Ryne Sandberg: World Series ‘made it able for me to live in the present

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Definitive proof that Carl Edwards Jr. is one of the filthiest pitchers on the planet

Carl Edwards Jr. didn't get a save or a win Monday night, but he was easily the most impressive pitcher on the field for the Cubs.

The 25-year-old right-hander came on in the sixth inning in relief of Eddie Butler and carved through the heart of the Nationals order, needing only 13 pitches to strike out Brian Goodwin, Bryce Harper and Ryan Zimmerman.

For starters, Joe Maddon deserves plenty of credit for deploying Edwards in an integral spot, even if it was so early in the game. But the Cubs were clinging to a 1-0 lead at the time and Maddon didn't want Butler to face the Washington order for a third time, so Edwards was the call to keep things close.

And that's exactly what Edwards did in dominant fashion. It was the fourth time this season he struck out three batters in an inning, but in the previous instances, he needed at least 16 pitches to do so.

Here is the complete sequence from Edwards to the three helpless Nats (for one inning, at least):

Harper was also locked in at the plate at the time, as it was his only strikeout in the last two games in which he's collected six hits in eight at-bats.

Edwards has been rolling this season with a 1.72 ERA and sparkling 0.82 WHIP. He has 44 strikeouts in 31.1 innings, ranking 18th in baseball in K/9 (12.64).

Since giving up three runs in an outing June 14 against the Mets, Edwards has not allowed a run in five innings, striking out seven batters and surrendering only two singles and a pair of walks.

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

Kyle Schwarber has rocky start to Triple-A stint

The Cubs gave Kyle Schwarber time to sort things out by sending him down to Triple-A Iowa, and Schwarber's first game back in the minors shows he may need some time.

Schwarber's first game with the Iowa Cubs was a forgettable one. He struck out in his first three plate appearances before singling in his last at-bat. He struck out looking in the first inning before striking out swinging his next two times up.

Schwarber batted third in the lineup and played left field. Iowa won 1-0 against the New Orleans Baby Cakes.

He last played for Iowa in 2015, but only spent 17 games there. He hit .333 with three homers and a 1.036 OPS in that short stint. Before getting sent down Schwarber was hitting .171 with the Cubs with 12 home runs, but also 75 strikeouts in 64 games.