How much for Wrigley Field's naming rights?

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How much for Wrigley Field's naming rights?

How much money are the Cubs leaving on the table by not renaming Wrigley Field?

That question was posed following today's announcement from the Chicago White Sox and U.S. Cellular that, while U.S. Cellular is selling its Chicago, St. Louis and central Illinois markets for a reported $480 million to SprintNextel, "U.S. Cellular Field" will remain unchanged. The White Sox signed the original deal with U.S. Cellular in 2003 for 68 million over 20 years, with the agreement paying the White Sox $3.4 million per season for the stadium's name, as well as an agreement to purchase significant advertising with the White Sox each season as a corporate sponsor?

So what about the stadium on the North Side?

Industry sources I spoke with all seem to believe that if a deal were to be completed to change the name it could generate $15-20 million a year, but they all cautioned that it comes with significant risk for the company that puts up the tremendous amount of money that it would take to reach an agreement.

"I can see the Cubs selling a secondary naming rights opportunity or perhaps naming each individual gate entrance to the stadium like the Yankees did. Something like Wrigley Field at 'XYZ park' would work, but the Cubs attract fans who want the Wrigley Field experience and if you change the name and you put in a Jumbotron, etc., how much does it change the experience of going to Wrigley Field, which is one of the last true old-time experiences in sports?" Jon Greenberg said.

One highly placed source who is a former owner who spoke to me on a condition of anonymity estimated that the Cubs are leaving an incredible amount of money on the table by staying at Wrigley Field and not selling naming rights to the stadium.

"There is no doubt in my mind that if the Cubs were willing to leave Wrigley Field and build a state-of-the-art stadium with all of the amenities that fans have come to expect these days, they would be able to make a deal in the range of $20-25 million per year," he said. "However, if I was running a major corporation and I was asked to buy the naming rights to a renovated Wrigley, I would not touch that deal because of the potential for negative backlash from the Cubs' huge fan base who have known that ballpark as Wrigley Field Field for nearly 100 years."

Report: Dexter Fowler closing in on deal with Cardinals

Report: Dexter Fowler closing in on deal with Cardinals

Dexter Fowler won't be making a surprise return to the Cubs next season.

Fowler is closing in on a deal to sign with the St. Louis Cardinals, according to USA Today's Bob Nightengale.

The Cubs signed outfielder Jon Jay last week to a one-year deal, pretty much sealing Fowler's future with the Cubs.

In two seasons in Chicago, Fowler batted .261/.367/.427 with 30 home runs and 94 RBI, and a World Series ring.

Koji Uehara would add another dimension to Cubs bullpen

Koji Uehara would add another dimension to Cubs bullpen

The Cubs are reportedly on the verge of adding another pitcher who’s notched the final out of a World Series as Theo Epstein’s front office builds out the bullpen for manager Joe Maddon.

The Cubs are nearing a one-year, $4.5 million deal with Koji Uehara, according to Nikkan Sports in Japan, which would open up even more possibilities for the defending champs in front of All-Star closer Wade Davis.

The Cubs made their biggest splash during this week’s winter meetings at National Harbor in Maryland by trading young outfielder Jorge Soler to the Kansas City Royals for Davis, who finished off Game 5 in the 2015 World Series.

Uehara closed out the 2013 World Series for the Boston Red Sox, the beginning of three straight seasons where he put up 20-plus saves. The Cubs have not confirmed an agreement is in place.

The Cubs needed another lefty presence with Mike Montgomery – the pitcher on the mound when the 108-year drought ended in November – moving to the rotation and Travis Wood likely leaving as a free agent.

Uehara throws right-handed, but he shuts down left-handed hitters (.183 batting average, .555 OPS across 800 at-bats) and has appeared in seven postseason series after a distinguished career in Japan.

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Uehara will turn 42 the day after Opening Day. But an array of relievers should help preserve Uehara, strengthen Carl Edwards Jr. (who’s generously listed at 170 pounds) and maybe prevent the late-season injuries that marginalized Hector Rondon and Pedro Strop during the playoffs.

“We’re going to try to build up a ton of depth,” Epstein said. “We’re going to try to build up a really talented, deep bullpen with a lot of different options that you can use in close games.

“Instead of three late-game options, it would be ideal if you had five or six. And you could always like who you’re turning to in the ‘pen and not feel the need to use a Rondon four out of five times.

“(We could) use them every other day and occasional back-to-backs. And that would help keep them fresh down the stretch – and help keep them strong in October.”