Hoyer thinks Cubs will connect with Deer

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Hoyer thinks Cubs will connect with Deer

Dont judge Rob Deer by the back of his baseball card.

That was essentially the message from general manager Jed Hoyer, responding to some of the chatter about the Cubs and their new assistant hitting coach. Maybe this name wouldnt have registered as much in another city, if White Sox sluggerstrikeout king Adam Dunn wasnt working on the South Side.

But between 1987 and 1993, Deer led the American League in strikeouts four times, while also generating the power that allowed him to crush 230 home runs during his big-league career.

I always think that mentioning a coachs stats as a player is one of the least useful things I can imagine, Hoyer said Tuesday. No one ever mentions Jim Leylands numbers or Tony La Russas numbers or any of those guys professional stats.

Coaching and playing are two very separate things. And just because a guy happened to strike out a lot, or didnt have a high batting average, it doesnt effect how well he teaches at all.

Deer is tight with manager Dale Sveum after their playing days together with the Milwaukee Brewers. Deer will work alongside hitting coach James Rowson. Sveum is also an old hitting coach and can often be seen giving instruction by the cage during batting practice.

In the past, Deer (San Diego Padres) and Rowson (New York Yankees) have worked as minor-league hitting coordinators, which should help them guide the youth movement at Wrigley Field.

Several well-respected organizations including the Atlanta Braves, Los Angeles Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies and St. Louis Cardinals have added an extra set of eyes and incorporated an assistant hitting coach. The logic is simple in what can be a copycat league.

Baseball teams in general are starting to realize that the pitching coach has 12 guys, and he has help from the bullpen coach, Hoyer said. The hitting coach has 13 guys and really no help at all.

In multiple interviews across the years, Deer has explained that he instructs hitters to do what he didnt, that he learned from his limitations. Theres also something to be said for the instant credibility that comes from having stepped into the box for more than 4,500 plate appearances in the big leagues.

I also would note that (Deer) was a guy who did get on base and had a lot of power, Hoyer said. But I dont think that a coachs playing background says a lot about how he coaches, how he teaches.

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Clubhouse frustration bubbling up for Cubs and Jake Arrieta

Clubhouse frustration bubbling up for Cubs and Jake Arrieta

PITTSBURGH — We interrupt your regularly scheduled coverage of The Plan and that wacky, fun-loving Cubs team to bring you a snapshot of clubhouse frustration.

Jake Arrieta sounded defensive while talking to reporters after Wednesday night’s 8-4 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park, standing in front of his locker and second-guessing manager Joe Maddon. On the other side of the room, veteran catcher Miguel Montero questioned the way the Cubs are preparing for the playoffs with Cactus League scripts.

The postgame questions started with Arrieta’s first-inning issues with umpire Chris Guccione’s strike zone. When reporters mentioned Maddon’s positive spin on a seven-run outing, Arrieta dismissed those happy-talk answers about his stuff — “it just wasn’t crisp” — and then wondered why he went from throwing to Montero to rookie Willson Contreras.

“The feeling of the game, from the first pitch, just wasn’t there,” Arrieta said. “Switching catchers just felt like we were trying to do a little too much instead of win a ballgame. But I didn’t throw well, no way around it.”

Montero went with a similar passive-aggressive tone, riffing on how the Cubs will maintain their edge almost two weeks after clinching the National League Central title and nine days before their first playoff game at Wrigley Field.

“Did it feel like spring training?” Montero said. “I do believe that. And that’s not a good feeling for a pitcher, for a player, to go into a game knowing that you’re going to play just four innings or five innings or whatever it is.

“This game is still important for all the players. It’s still important for every single guy. I don’t want to go out there not caring about winning or losing. That’s not my mentality. My mentality is going out there because I want to win, regardless.

“We have to trick our mind. Because if that’s how we’re going to go the rest of the way, I guess we need to trick ourselves.”

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Unprompted, Montero brought up the Pirates scoring three runs in the ninth inning on Tuesday night before the Cubs hung on for a 6-4 victory — without using Aroldis Chapman — as Maddon tries to keep the bullpen fresh for the playoffs.

“We didn’t have our closer warming up,” Montero said. “That’s something I take personally because I’m catching and I want to win.

“It’s hard. I understand (Joe’s) point. And I understand the organization’s point. I respect it. I can only control what I can control. It is what it is.”

OK then, the Cubs are still a 101-win team and the NL’s No. 1 seed. But this became a sharp contrast to all the backslapping after the pregame announcement of Theo Epstein’s monster contract extension. And Arrieta didn’t look like a reigning Cy Young Award winner, giving up 10 hits while John Jaso — who does look like a Pirate — lined a curveball into the right-field seats for a three-run homer in the fourth inning and hit for the cycle.

“We’re moving on,” Arrieta said. “We’ll prepare for the next one. I don’t like giving up seven runs. I’m pissed about that. But moving forward, everything’s fine.”

With Jon Lester and Kyle Hendricks lined up at the front of the playoff rotation, Arrieta’s next start is almost two weeks away.

“It doesn’t matter,” Arrieta said. “I’ll throw sides. I’ll prepare. And whoever I face first round — they’re going to be in trouble.”

After burning through 103 pitches in five innings, Arrieta’s regular-season odometer is now at 197 1/3 innings, but he has zero interest in a gimmick that would get him to 200 this weekend against the Cincinnati Reds at Great American Ball Park.

“Listen, I want to pitch on a schedule,” Arrieta said. “I don’t want to throw an inning in a game. I’m not trying to do anything different. Let’s just prepare like we normally do and go out and try to win games. I’m not trying to throw a bullpen in a game.”

Look, if this isn’t trouble in paradise, then it’s obvious that the Cubs are a hyper-competitive group that knows what’s at stake in October and has some independent thinkers and strong personalities. And that Arrieta’s unreal 2015 season created impossible standards for this year that couldn’t be met with an 18-8 record and a 3.10 ERA, the type of numbers that still get pitchers $200 million contracts.

“I don’t think you know how hard this game is unless you play it,” Arrieta said. “I feel I can have another season like that. People have done it before. Why can’t I do it? I can do it again. So, yeah, I appreciate it. But at the same time, that’s what you strive for. That’s why you work hard. You go out and you try to perform that way.”