Chicago Cubs

Ignoring the rumors, Garza open to future with Cubs

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Ignoring the rumors, Garza open to future with Cubs

Matt Garza blocks out all the noise. He plugs headphones into his ears and pulls a hooded sweatshirt so far down it nearly covers his entire face.

There are times in the clubhouse where Garza seems like hes in his own world. Before playoff starts with the Tampa Bay Rays, he tried to think about the game as little as possible.

Thats how Garzas going to approach the trade rumors that are only going to intensify when the industry begins checking into the Hilton Anatole on Sunday in Dallas.

Garza would prefer to remain underground until pitchers and catchers report. Hes immune to the speculation by now: I've gone through it for the last six years of my career.

What Theo Epstein does with Garza will be a window into what he thinks about the Cubs, how long before they can realistically get back into contention.

This front office knows that Garza has guts. He didnt back down in a brutal division. He knocked the Boston Red Sox out of the 2008 ALCS. He delivered seven innings of one-run ball in Game 7 and picked up an MVP award.

I know how to beat 'em, Garza said with a smile. I like the teams I faced there. Hopefully, we can build one here.

Garza stood beneath the Wrigley Field marquee on Saturday night, next to Hall of Famer Ernie Banks, for a Christmas tree-lighting ceremony that brought out the Ricketts family and a line of politicians that included Gov. Pat Quinn.

Garza is still a Cub, and the sense is that he probably will remain one unless Epstein gets blown away with an offer for the 28-year-old pitcher. The president of baseball operations has described him as exactly the type of guy that wed like to build around.

Thats awesome. Thats a huge compliment, Garza said. But like I said, I stay out of it until I show up for spring training.

The issue is that Garzas timeline might not match up exactly with Epsteins vision for rebuilding. Garza banked almost 6 million last season, and will be eligible for arbitration the next two years. Hed be ideal for a team that expects to play in October.

The same value wont be there if the Cubs are losing 91 games again. Then again, Epstein said youre going to need your ninth starter at some point during the course of the season. So why trade away your best one?

To this point, Epstein and Garza have only really said hello. They havent sat down for a significant meeting. Epstein mentioned that trades arent the only way to create a long-term asset. You can also do contract extensions.

I'm open to whatever, Garza said. My family lives here, if that's any indication. My family goes everywhere. I just want to play the game. It doesn't bother me where I play. I do love Chicago, but that's the way it goes.

Garzas making Chicago his offseason home, and has enrolled his children in school here. His career record is 52-54 with a 3.83 ERA, but with his raw talent there are reasons to think bigger.

After being traded twice already, Garza certainly understands this is a business. Hes just not particularly interested in the details. He stays in contact with his agent, but otherwise doesnt pay attention to it.

He said it's going to be an active winter meetings, so watch the TV, Garza said. I (told him): Well, Ill be in Italy. I'm going to completely stay out of everything. I'm just going to enjoy my offseason. That's about it.

So Garzas going to Italy on vacation next week. His next destination will say a lot about where the Cubs are heading.

In thick of tight division race, Cubs add catcher Rene Rivera: 'You can't have enough experience'

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USA TODAY

In thick of tight division race, Cubs add catcher Rene Rivera: 'You can't have enough experience'

If this was 2016, the Cubs might not have bothered to acquire Rene Rivera.

But this isn’t 2016.

The Cubs have a vastly different catching situation than they did a year ago. But even more importantly, they’ve been unable to build any sort of lead in a crowded National League Central race.

Rivera, claimed off waivers from the New York Mets on Saturday morning, almost surely won’t end up being the guy who fuels the Cubs’ pulling away from the Milwaukee Brewers and St. Louis Cardinals. But with Willson Contreras on the disabled list, Miguel Montero on the Toronto Blue Jays, Alex Avila not even a month into his Cubs tenure and Victor Caratini just 17 games into his big league career, adding an extra veteran presence behind the plate seems like a pretty good idea.

“It’s like you can’t have enough pitching. You can’t have enough experience, depth-wise, especially at that position,” manager Joe Maddon said Saturday. “So I though we were very fortunate to be able to do this right now. Theo (Epstein, team president) told me about the potential yesterday, obviously it happened.”

This time last season, the Cubs had a reliable 1-2 punch behind the plate with Montero and Contreras. And more notably they had a double-digit lead in the NL Central standings. There’s been an awful lot of change since, with Montero’s brutal honesty getting him shipped off to Canada and Contreras injuring his leg in San Francisco.

Fortunately for the Cubs, they invested some of their last remaining minor league capital in acquiring Avila. Avila won’t replicate the kind of offensive production that made Contreras the hottest hitter on the team, but he’s a very capable starting catcher during Contreras’ time on the shelf.

And while Caratini has been fine — in fact, he’s hitting .400 since Contreras went down and collected three hits in Friday’s win over the Blue Jays — the Cubs are no longer about getting guys experience in August and September. The stakes are much higher.

The Cubs might’ve been an unstoppable juggernaut during the 2016 regular season. This year, though, has been a much different story, and a playoff spot is hardly a certainty.

Rivera isn’t going to solve the problems that have made it so the Cubs are stuck fighting for the crown of a middle-of-the-road division. But he’ll bring veteran experience to a playoff race that could last all the way until the season’s final days.

Rivera has been playing big league ball since 2004 but has totaled just nine years of major league service since then, serving in backup roles and just twice appearing in more than 100 games in a season. The Cubs raved about his defensive ability Saturday — as well as the eight homers he hit in 54 games for the Mets this season.

“He’s very good. Saw him with different teams, we’ve all seen him. He’s got a great reputation,” Maddon said. “Nice fella. Very good defensive player, great reputation. And he's got some pop, too. He hit a couple home runs. So that veteran kind of presence, the depth that it provides is all good stuff.”

No announcement has been made about the active roster. Minor league pitcher Aaron Brooks was designated for assignment to make room for Rivera on the 40-man roster. But the general thinking is that Caratini will head back to Triple-A Iowa.

“He’s done really well,” Maddon said of Caratini. “The way he’s blocked pitches in the dirt has been spectacular. I’ve enjoyed watching his receiving and his blocking, too. The pitchers have been really happy with him. … He’s very aware of building relationships with his pitchers, which I like. And it seems as if the pitchers are into him, too.

“There’s a great future for him in this game.”

But right now, the Cubs need all the experience they can get.

The worst seventh-inning stretch performances of all time

The worst seventh-inning stretch performances of all time

Just 14 years ago, Cubs fans heard quite possibly the worst rendition of "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" ever. 

Ozzy Osbourne, lead vocalist for Black Sabbath, took the mic that 2003 afternoon at Wrigley and made eardrums bleed. It was that painful. 

It got "In the Loop" thinking, what were some other horrendous singing performances? 

From Da Coach to Scottie Pippen, the video above mashes up the worst of the worst.