Kaplan: Cubs close to multi-year deal with Marmol

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Kaplan: Cubs close to multi-year deal with Marmol

Thursday, Feb. 3, 2011
Posted 11:32 p.m.

By David Kaplan
CSNChicago.com

The Chicago Cubs are moving towards finalizing a multi-year deal with star closer Carlos Marmol. The 28-year-old had 38 saves in 2010 with a 2.55 ERA and 138 strikeouts setting a major league record by averaging 15.9 K's per 9 innings.

Marmol is considered one of the most dominant closers in the game but does deal with bouts of wildness that hamper his effectiveness at times. He hit 8 batters and walked 52 in 77.2 innings of work last season.

The deal is expected to be completed before pitchers and catcher report to spring training next weekend.

Marmol and the Cubs went to arbitration with Marmol asking for 5.65 million and the Cubs countered at 4.1 million.

David Kaplan is the host of Chicago Tribune Live on Comcast SportsNet. Follow him on Twitter @thekapman.

Kris Bryant releases epic teaser for wedding video

Kris Bryant releases epic teaser for wedding video

The latest installment in Kris Bryant's fairy tale year is now on video.

After breaking the curse and winning the World Series with the Cubs and earning the National League MVP, Bryant married his longtime girlfriend Jessica in early January and took his "honeymoon" in Chicago at Cubs Convention.

Monday night, Bryant sent out a preview video of his wedding on Instagram and it's pretty epic:

Little wedding video teaser! Can't wait for the whole thing! 📽: @newflyfilms

A video posted by Kris Bryant (@kris_bryant17) on

You can catch part of Bryant's wedding vows and a clip of Cubs teammates like Kyle Schwarber as the video camera pans down the aisle.

Now the question becomes: Will the Bryants make the entire video available to the public when it's done?

Report: Cubs preparing to roll the dice with Brett Anderson

Report: Cubs preparing to roll the dice with Brett Anderson

The Cubs are preparing to roll the dice with Brett Anderson, hoping the talented, frequently injured pitcher can stay healthy and provide insurance for their rotation.

Anderson posted a telling message on his Twitter account on Monday night, hinting at what would be another offseason check mark for the defending World Series champs.

The physical for the agreement — first reported by Ken Rosenthal of Fox Sports and MLB Network — won't just be a formality as Anderson underwent back surgery last March and appeared in only four games for the Los Angeles Dodgers last season.

But Anderson fits on paper as a left-hander who will turn only 29 on Feb. 1 and won't have to carry front-of-the-rotation responsibilities or feel Opening Day urgency on a team with five projected starters.

The Cubs had been willing to gamble around $6 million on Tyson Ross, who recently signed a similarly structured one-year deal with the Texas Rangers as he recovers from surgery to address thoracic outlet syndrome.

The calculus would essentially be the same with Anderson. The Cubs have to factor in last year's grueling playoff run into early November, this season's sky-high expectations, the organization's lack of high-end, upper-level pitching prospects and the uncertainty surrounding the 2018 rotation.

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Anderson finished sixth in the 2009 American League Rookie of the Year voting with the Oakland A's, but he's reached the 30-start mark only one other time and never accounted for 200 innings in a single season.

Anderson underwent Tommy John surgery in the middle of the 2011 season, and the injuries piled up from there, dealing with a strained right oblique, a stress fracture in his right foot and a broken left index finger.

Anderson had such a fragile reputation that he accepted the one-year, $15.8 million qualifying offer from the Dodgers after a strong platform year in 2015 (10-9, 3.69 ERA). The Dodgers only got 11 1/3 innings out of Anderson, who didn't pitch during a playoff run that ended at Wrigley Field in the National League Championship Series.

The Cubs stayed exceptionally healthy while winning 200 games across the last two seasons and need to be prepared in case John Lackey sharply declines at the age of 38 or Mike Montgomery experiences growing pains while transitioning from the bullpen.

Whether or not Anderson is ultimately the answer, the Cubs will be looking to place a sixth starter into their plans.

"I don't know if a six-man rotation on a permanent basis is the wave of the future," team president Theo Epstein said earlier this winter. "But we certainly endorse it on a temporary basis as a nice way to pace guys for the whole season.

"We can get them some rest, whether you do it in April to preserve depth and ease guys into the season, especially after a deep October and November run. Or after the All-Star break in the summer to kind of get through the dog days and give guys a little bit of a breather as you ramp up for the stretch run.

"I think it would be tough to pull off all season long. But it's something that (could certainly work) in the right spot."