Kaplan: Cubs discussing Garza; deal not imminent

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Kaplan: Cubs discussing Garza; deal not imminent

Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011
9:58 AM Updated 5:06 PM

By David Kaplan
CSNChicago.com

There has much speculation about the Cubs pursuit of Tampa Bay Rays starter Matt Garza and this morning Gordon Wittenmyer of the Chicago Sun Times posted a story that says that the Cubs are close to finalizing a trade for the hard throwing 27-year-old.

Wittenmyers report says this:

"The Cubs appear to have moved past the Texas Rangers and into the drivers seat in efforts to acquire Tampa Bay Rays 15-game winner Matt Garza a potential move that could put the Cubs back into the National League Central title conversation for 2011.A major-league source said Tuesday the Cubs were close to trading for the power-pitching right-hander, just as the Rangers were committing a big multiyear deal to third baseman Adrian Beltre and appeared to be pursuing free-agent closer Rafael Soriano. Those efforts come after the Rangers fell short in their efforts to use the money to keep big-ticket free-agent pitcher Cliff Lee.Landing Garza who has as many postseason wins as the returning Cubs roster combined would be a significant response to upstart Cincinnatis pitching-driven division title last season and division-rival Milwaukees trade for Cy Young winner Zack Greinke last month.It would give the Cubs a Ryan Dempster-Garza-Carlos Zambrano top three to their starting rotation and make the back end look stronger with only two spots between Andrew Cashner, Randy Wells, Carlos Silva, Tom Gorzelanny and Jeff Samardzija. That would open the door for one or more of them to be traded in a next-step deal, depending on who might be included in a Garza move."

I just spoke with three major league sources who all told me that while there have been discussions about Garza between Tampa Bay and Chicago, no deal is imminent. In fact, names of potential players that the Cubs could include in the deal have not yet been exchanged. The price to land Garza will be very high because of a number of reasons. First, he won 15 games in the rugged AL East which means he has guts and that is tough to find in young, proven pitching. Second, he is only 27 so his best days barring injury should be ahead of him. Third, he is under team control for three more seasons so that cost certainty will be very expensive to acquire, one well known agent told me this morning.

The St. Petersburg Times reports that there are no indication that the Rays are looking to trade any of their six starting pitchers right now unless they are overwhelmed by an offer.

The Cubs are willing to put a solid package of players together if indeed Tampa Bay is willing to move him but unless that package overwhelms Rays GM Andrew Friedman he, according to an excellent source in Tampa, is more than likely to hang on to Garza until he sees what the market is during the season. As to why Tampa would move a young starter that they control who is only 27? First off, after losing the core of their team in free agency, (Carl Crawford, Carlos Pena, etc) they are not expected to be a contender in 2011. So if they can rebuild a number of spots on their roster by trading a prized commodity in starting pitching where they already have some depth it makes sense to consider it.

Look for Cubs GM Jim Hendry to continue to gauge the price and if it makes sense the Cubs are willing to make the move. They have significant money coming off the books after this coming season so Garza certainly would be an excellent addition going forward. However, the deal is not imminent at this point. Things change quickly in baseball so I will keep you posted as developments occur.

David Kaplan is the host of Chicago Tribune Live on Comcast SportsNet. Follow him on Twitter @thekapman.

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

Honda Road Ahead: Can Cubs slow down Nationals bats?

CSN's David Kaplan and David DeJesus discuss the upcoming matchups in this edition of the Cubs Road Ahead, presented by Chicagoland & NW Indiana Honda Dealers.

Maybe a four-game series with the N.L. East-leading Washington Nationals will help the Cubs take off. 

It did last year. 

The Cubs swept the Nats early last season, boosting themselves into first place in the National League - a position they wouldn't relinquish. More than a sweep, though, a positive series is vital for a team that continues to hover around .500. 

To do so, Joe Maddon's pitchers must somehow slow the Nationals offense, which has managed to push across more runs than any team in the majors. 

After D.C., the Cubs are off to Cincy for a three-game set with the Reds. 

Watch David Kaplan and David DeJesus preview the upcoming matchups in the video above. 

Cubs in sink-or-swim mode with Nationals looming: ‘Keep the floaties on’

Cubs in sink-or-swim mode with Nationals looming: ‘Keep the floaties on’

MIAMI – Jon Jay walked into a quiet clubhouse late Sunday morning, turned right and headed directly toward the sound system in one corner of the room, plugging his phone into the sound system and playing Bob Marley’s “Three Little Birds.”

The Cubs outfielder whistled as he changed into his work clothes at Marlins Park, singing along to the lyrics with Anthony Rizzo a few lockers over: “Don’t worry, about a thing, ‘cause every little thing gonna be all right.” 

That’s what the Cubs keep telling themselves, because most of them have World Series rings and the National League Central is such a bad division.

“The biggest thing is to keep the floaties on until we get this thing right,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 4-2 loss left the Cubs treading water again at 38-37. “We’re solvent. We’re right there. We’re right next to first place.”

In leaving this relaxed tropical environment after a 4-2 loss, the Cubs will jump into the deep end on Monday night for the start of a four-game showdown at Nationals Park, where Dusty Baker will stack his rotation with Gio Gonzalez, Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg and hope Bryce Harper, Daniel Murphy and Ryan Zimmerman can outslug a bad bullpen.

Maddon already sounded doubtful about All-Star shortstop Addison Russell, who mishandled the spin on a routine Ichiro Suzuki groundball in the first inning and later exited the game with a “sharp, pinching pain” at the front of his right shoulder.

Miami sunk the Cubs with three unearned runs after Russell’s error, part of a season-long trend where the defending champs can’t seem to put it all together in every phase of the game. Martin Prado drilled Mike Montgomery’s first-pitch, 93-mph fastball off the left-center field wall for a two-out, two-run double and the Cubs will have to play sharper against the first-place Nationals (45-30).

“It could be a great test,” reigning NL MVP Kris Bryant said. “It will be nice to see where we’re at against them.”

The Cubs had enough trouble against Edinson Volquez and the Miami bullpen, translating eight hits and seven walks into only two runs while leaving 11 runners on base. That wasted a quality start from Montgomery (1-4, 2.03 ERA), who lasted six innings and retired the last 10 batters he faced. More than anything, Maddon sounded disappointed in Willson Contreras missing a hit-and-run sign in the seventh inning and Ian Happ getting thrown out at second base.

“Keep The Floaties On” sounds like an idea for Maddon’s next T-shirt. The 2017 Cubs haven’t been more than four games over .500 or two games under .500 at any point this season. The 2016 Cubs didn’t lose their 37th game until July 19 and spent 180 days in first place.

“That’s what was so special about it,” Rizzo said. “We boat-raced from Game 1 to Game 7 with a couple bumps in the road, but this is baseball. It’s not going to be all smooth-sailing every day. You got to work through things.”

The Cubs might be working without the safety net of a wild card when the Los Angeles Dodgers, Arizona Diamondbacks and Colorado Rockies are all on pace for close to 100 victories in the brutal NL West. For all their inconsistencies, the Cubs are still only 1.5 games behind the first-place Milwaukee Brewers in a division where the other three teams could become trade-deadline sellers.

“I know that, but I also know that we have not had that run yet, which I believe we have (in us),” Maddon said. “I’m waiting on us to get well. I want our young guys to (use) the whole field, hitting-wise, and see where that can take us. Right now, our starters are pitching like we thought that they could.

“I’ve always wanted to win the division, obviously. We’ll just play that out. It’s too early for me to really be concerned about that yet. We’re pitching better. We’re catching the ball better. And now all of a sudden, they’re starting to use the whole field. So let’s see where this takes us right now.”

Sink or swim, the Cubs are going into the nation’s capital, less than six months after their White House visit. The big idea will be survival more than dynasty in what could still be a playoff preview.

“We’re looking forward to play them,” Montgomery said. “We know where they’re at. We know we could see them down the line.”