LIVE: Johnson throws out run at the plate

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LIVE: Johnson throws out run at the plate

Wednesday, Sept. 7, 2011
Posted: 10:22 a.m.

Associated Press

Cincinnati's Johnny Cueto hardly looked like a pitcher in line to win an ERA title the last time he took the ball.

He didn't look like one in his last start against the Chicago Cubs, either.

Cueto tries to bounce back from a rough outing and exact some revenge against a Cubs team that gave him trouble a month ago when he takes the mound for the Reds in Wednesday night's series finale at Wrigley Field.

After dropping Monday's opener 4-3, Cincinnati (70-72) withstood a late rally from the Cubs to win 4-2 in 13 innings on Tuesday. The Reds looked like they were going to cruise to a 2-0 victory with Mike Leake one out away from throwing a one-hitter, but Starlin Castro hit a two-out infield single in the ninth and pinch hitter Bryan La Hair followed with a game-tying home run.

Four innings later, Cincinnati finally earned its third victory in five games after Joey Votto's second RBI double of the game.

The Reds have been tough to beat with Cueto (9-5, 2.29 ERA) on the mound, winning nine of his last 11 starts. They won for the fifth straight time with him on the mound Friday, although the major league ERA leader wasn't particularly sharp.

Cueto allowed five runs and eight hits in five innings and didn't get the decision in an 11-8 victory over St. Louis.

"Johnny didn't have his normal good stuff," manager Dusty Baker told the Reds' official website. "He was centering some balls over the heart of the plate."

The right-hander, who had a 2.00 ERA in his previous four starts, endured his worst outing since permitting five runs, seven hits, three walks and hitting two batters in 3 2-3 innings of an 11-4 loss to the Cubs on Aug. 6.

Cueto, who opened the year on the disabled list with right biceps irritation, fared much better at Wrigley in his season debut May 8, yielding five hits in six innings of a 2-0 victory.

The Cubs (61-81), losers of 11 of 16, counter with Ryan Dempster (10-11, 4.75), who is 0-3 with a 6.06 ERA in his last three starts after going 3-0 with a 2.77 ERA in his previous four.

One of those victories came over the Reds at Wrigley on Aug. 5, when Dempster gave up two runs, four hits and a season-high tying six walks in six innings of a 4-3 win. The right-hander is 2-1 with a 2.37 ERA against Cincinnati this season, yielding two runs or fewer in all three outings. He is also 2-2 with a 2.39 ERA in his last four starts in the series in Chicago.

Dempster didn't pitch badly against Pittsburgh on Friday, allowing three runs and seven hits while striking out nine and throwing a season-high 121 pitches in 6 1-3 innings, but wound up on the wrong end of a 3-1 score. It marked the seventh time in Dempster's last eight starts that he gave up three runs or fewer.

Dempster has done a good job keeping Votto in check, limiting him to a .174 average with two homers and seven strikeouts in 23 career at-bats.

Castro, who is batting .306 during an eight-game hitting streak, has had even less success against Cueto, going 1 for 11.
Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

This is the identity of the 2017 Cubs so far: 'Up and down, up and down'

This is the identity of the 2017 Cubs so far: 'Up and down, up and down'

MIAMI – The Cubs are the defending champs, but at the moment they really don’t have much of an identity beyond that, unsure what they can count on from one game to the next, waiting to get healthy and still searching for that sense of rhythm 45 percent into the season.

This is a 37-36 team dealing with injuries near the top of the rotation (Kyle Hendricks), the middle of the lineup (Ben Zobrist) and the heart of the defense (Jason Heyward) while a World Series legend (Kyle Schwarber) gets a few days to clear his head before reporting to Triple-A Iowa.

Just when it looks like the rotation is gathering strength, the offense went missing again during Friday’s 2-0 loss at Marlins Park, the night after the Cubs scored 11 runs in Miami and talked about it as the type of game that can create momentum.

“The difference 24 hours can make,” manager Joe Maddon said.

But this has been building for almost three full months. The Cubs have been shut out six times already and at the .500 mark at 15 different points this season.

The good news: John Lackey hit 94 mph and has put together back-to-back quality starts for a starting five with a 2.35 ERA the last two turns through the rotation. The 10 games before that, the Cubs rotation put up a 5.65 ERA, but neither trend has really changed the overall picture in a weak National League Central. 

“That’s where it all starts, for sure,” Lackey said. “If you’re going to be a consistent winning team, you got to have good starting pitching, because the offense can kind of come and go.

“You got to remember they’re pretty young. We got a lot of guys still learning, still making adjustments in the game. But the talent’s there, so you like our chances in the end for those guys to do good stuff.”  

The bad news: Lackey had no margin for error as the Marlins needed only three hits to score two runs (one earned). Lackey gave up his 21st home run – he allowed 23 in almost 190 innings last year – in the third inning when Giancarlo Stanton launched an 83-mph pitch 458 feet beyond the garish pink-flamingos-and-palm-trees sculpture.   

Defense was supposed to be the constant with this team, but the Marlins manufactured an insurance run in the sixth inning when Dee Gordon stole second base off Lackey and catcher Miguel Montero threw the ball away, setting up Christian Yelich’s sacrifice fly.   

“I certainly have all the confidence in the world in everybody here,” reigning NL MVP Kris Bryant said. “Last year was a great year for us. Everybody just seemed to be hitting at the right time, pitching good at the right time. Everything clicked.

“This season hasn’t been that way. You look at many players – and many Hall of Fame players – they’ve had some down years here and there. It just kind of seems like as a group we’re a little down right now, but plenty of time to turn it around.”

Ian Happ and Javier Baez accounted for four of the six hits against right-hander Jose Urena and three different relievers as the Cubs hit into three double plays, struck out seven times and followed the same pattern.  

“Our offense is just like you saw – up and down, up and down,” Maddon said. “It is youthful. Listen, I don’t want to keep saying that, but it’s true. It just is. These guys need more at-bats to figure out what to not swing at and how to battle.”

Joe Maddon on Ian Happ: ‘Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen’

Joe Maddon on Ian Happ: ‘Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen’

MIAMI – The Cubs factored Ian Happ into their preseason plans, hoping he could give the team a shot of adrenaline at some point and play well enough to be marketed as a trade chip in a blockbuster deal for pitching.

But the Cubs couldn’t have projected this for late June: Happ batting third behind Anthony Rizzo and Kris Bryant, the switch-hitting presence and middle-of-the-order force needed with Ben Zobrist on the disabled list and Kyle Schwarber about to get a mental reset at Triple-A Iowa.

“Pound for pound, man, he’s got as good a power as I’ve seen, when you look at the size and how far the ball goes,” manager Joe Maddon said Friday at Marlins Park. “It’s a unique combination of size and strength. You normally see a bigger guy with that kind of juice."

Happ (6-foot, 205 pounds) also patrolled right field that night – one of four different positions the rookie has handled so far – with Gold Glove defender Jason Heyward also on the disabled list and the Cubs in scramble mode.

The Schwarber demotion is a reminder of how hard this game is, how quickly it can spin out of control and how small sample sizes can be misleading, even on the biggest stages against some of the best pitchers on the planet.

But check out Happ’s first six weeks in The Show projected as a 162-game average on Baseball-Reference.com: 46 homers, 97 RBI, .916 OPS and 199 strikeouts.

“He’s just really interesting,” Maddon said. “Now you’re seeing him hit better from the right side, too, which is really going to matter. That really makes him a threat. You put him in the lineup based on that.”

The shorthanded Cubs have needed Happ – at the age of 22 – to protect Bryzzo Souvenir Co., add another layer of Zobrist versatility and learn it all on the fly for a team with World Series expectations.

“He’s pretty self-confident,” Maddon said. “There’s times I can tell when it’s beating him up a little bit when he goes through some of those funks where maybe he’s chasing pitches out of the zone. But he seems to rebound very quickly. Strong-minded. Strong-willed. Very confident individual.”

[MORE CUBS: Cubs hopeful Kyle Hendricks returns before All-Star break]

Two weeks into Happ’s big-league career, Maddon got questions about how long the Cubs will be patient and what they would need to see out of him before thinking about a return trip to Des Moines.

Though Happ was hitting .207 as recently as last week, his average has jumped roughly 40 points. He’s homered eight times in his last 14 starts. Fifteen of his 21 RBI have come with two outs. His OPS hasn’t fallen below .741 at any point this season.

“That’s adjusting,” Maddon said. “You get here, nobody really knows you, they throw you pitches, you hit ‘em well. And all of a sudden, you stop seeing those pitches. You’re not going to see them again until you stop swinging at the stuff that they want you to swing at.

“He’s done a pretty good job of laying off the bad stuff. That’s why it’s coming back to him. He’s really reorganized the strike zone here.”

That whole process sped up on Schwarber, who lost the swagger and the ability to crush fastballs that made him such a dangerous hitter. Happ doesn’t have it all figured out, but by the look on his face and the sound of his voice, you would have no idea whether or not he’s hitting. 

“Unbelievable guy,” said Happ, who’s tight with Schwarber. “He’ll go down, rake, be back soon and do what he’s capable of doing, which is hitting the ball hard all over the ballpark. He’s done it his whole life. And he’ll continue to do it.”