Marmol touched up, Cubs beat Reds

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Marmol touched up, Cubs beat Reds

MESA, Ariz. (AP) At least Cincinnati Reds pitcher Bronson Arroyo and Chicago Cubs reliever Carlos Marmol have plenty of time to work out the kinks.Arroyo was hit hard and Marmol also struggled during Chicago's 8-6 exhibition victory over Cincinnati on Monday.Arroyo pitched two innings and was charged with four runs and six hits, including a monster home run by Alfonso Soriano. The crafty right-hander, who was 9-12 with a 5.07 ERA last season, struck out one and walked two."I faced 12 batters and they squared up six balls and the other balls they didn't square up were base hits and the umpire gave me a strike three that wasn't even a strike," said Arroyo, who is 0-1 with a 9.00 ERA in five spring innings. "That's not a good outing."Reds manager Dusty Baker didn't seem too concerned."Arroyo's velocity was better," Baker said. "He didn't have location today. He'll get better. When (Arroyo) had problems last year it was walks and home runs. That's what got us today."But there was some good to come out of it."It was a struggle out there, even physically I didn't feel real lively," Arroyo said. "It is nice sometimes to get runners on base in situations where you have to press in a real game. Where you have to dig deep and have to throw a fastball on the outer half to a lefty when you feel like you don't have great command."That feeling is something that needs to be worked through."Marmol was touched up for the second outing in a row and knocked over a garbage can in the clubhouse after he left the mound. He gave up three runs and two hits in one inning.The right-hander, who blew 10 save opportunities last season and finished with a 4.01 ERA, also was hit hard against Seattle on Thursday, when he yielded four earned runs and four hits while recording just two outs.Cubs starter Paul Maholm, who had the flu early in camp, made his spring debut and allowed one run and two hits in two innings. The left-hander, who signed with Chicago over the winter, struck out one and walked none."It was good," Maholm said. "I was happy to get out there. You don't feel part of (spring training) until you get out there. I wish I would have gotten ahead of a few more guys. There were no walks and I was aggressive."I was good to go and I pitch when they tell me to. If they want me to take it a little slower that is fine. I got my bullpens in so as far as pitches and innings I am where I need to be."Todd Frazier homered in the second inning for the Reds. Zack Cozart and Donald Lutz had two RBIs apiece.The Cubs got another big day from Joe Mather, who is battling Tony Campana for the fifth outfield spot. Mather hit a three-run home run in the seventh to give Chicago a 7-6 lead and is batting .545 (6 for 11) this spring.Soriano belted his fourth spring homer, and reserve catcher Blake Lalli also went deep for the Cubs.

Cubs manager Joe Maddon misses his chance to guest-star in ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’

Cubs manager Joe Maddon misses his chance to guest-star in ‘Curb Your Enthusiasm’

MESA, Ariz. – This is a big bowl of wrong: Cubs manager Joe Maddon might have missed his only window to make the "Curb Your Enthusiasm" cameo appearance Jeff Garlin promised. 

Garlin – a Second City alumnus and one of several celebrity fans within the team's orbit – had offered Maddon a role whenever Larry David brought the band back together for the loosely scripted HBO comedy.

But last week's Cactus League media event at the Arizona Biltmore conflicted with filming in Southern California, where "Curb Your Enthusiasm" is working on a ninth season after a five-year hiatus.

"There was one matchup, and I couldn't get there," Maddon said before Sunday's World Series rematch against the Cleveland Indians at Sloan Park. "I just couldn't do it. It'll happen."

During an all-over-the-place session with reporters that lasted 20-plus minutes, Maddon declined to make any Oscar predictions, saying he's into Netflix and Hulu now and doesn't really go to the movies anymore.

Maddon also hasn't watched much – or any – of the World Series highlights or documentaries. When it came to the handling Aroldis Chapman part, there were some boos inside Chicago's Civic Opera House during the premiere of Major League Baseball's "The 2016 World Series."

But Maddon said he basically skipped that type of content after being Mike Scioscia's bench coach for the 2002 Anaheim Angels and managing the Tampa Bay Rays to the 2008 World Series.

"You get busy and I don't know," Maddon said. "I need to start reading more and watching Netflix less."

Didn't you say that last spring?

"I did," Maddon said.

Maddon had been addicted to cable news during last year's polarizing presidential campaign: "But, damn, it's gotten really annoying, so I stopped watching all that stuff. It's just not good for your brain. It's really not. There's nothing to be gained."

When Maddon starts rolling, it's not hard to picture him in a scene with David and J.B. Smoove. Shaquille O'Neal, John McEnroe and Bill Buckner are among the sports figures with "Curb Your Enthusiasm" credits.

"That was the only day, so I don't know how we're going to figure this out," Maddon said. "First, they had one day set up, and that was going to be good. And then they had to change it to this other day, which was not good. So we'll have to (come up with something else), even if it's maybe a picture on the wall or a phone call."

Jason Heyward surprised Cubs fans didn’t boo Rajai Davis more

Jason Heyward surprised Cubs fans didn’t boo Rajai Davis more

MESA, Ariz. – The Cactus League crowds are different than the ones packed into Wrigley Field. It was only a meaningless split-squad game on a Saturday afternoon in the Arizona sunshine. Finally winning the World Series must have somewhat dulled the edge.

But Cubs outfielder Jason Heyward still thought Rajai Davis would hear it from the sellout crowd of 14,929 at Sloan Park, the what-could-have-been anxiety bubbling up when seeing the Oakland A's leadoff guy who nearly changed the course of baseball history.

"I was surprised he didn't get booed more, but that's just how our fans are," Heyward said. "They're fun like that. They have fun with the game. They acknowledge it. That's pretty cool for Cubs fans to boo you. If anybody boos you from last year, that's kind of an honor, I would say. To be on that side of things, it means you did something great."

As Alfonso Soriano liked to say, they don't boo nobodies. With one big swing, Davis almost unleashed a miserable winter for the Cubs and ended the Cleveland Indians' 68-year drought.

Manager Joe Maddon kept pushing closer Aroldis Chapman, who fired 97 pitches in Games 5, 6, and 7 combined. Davis timed seven straight fastballs in the eighth inning – the last one at 97.1 mph – and drove a Game 7-tying two-run homer just inside the foul pole and onto the left-field patio. In a now-famous rain-delay speech, Heyward gathered his teammates in a Progressive Field weight room as the Cubs regained their composure.

"They booed him, but only the first at-bat," Heyward said. "The second at-bat and the third, I was like: ‘Eh, they kind of just let him off the hook.' They let him be."

The fans who stuck around until the end got to hear "Go Cubs Go" after a 4-3 win. Davis parlayed that big moment into a one-year, $6 million contract with the A's. The Cubs will see the Indians again on Sunday afternoon in Mesa.

"As players, we're all onto the season and enjoying this ride and a new journey," said Heyward, who went 0-for-3 with an RBI as he worked on his new swing. "All the teams that we played in the playoffs are obviously out here in spring training, so it's just really fun and it's good for the makeup of your team when you compete that way.

"You're thrown right back into the fire when you talk about the competition and remembering things that happened in the postseason. But we don't dwell on it too much."