Mattingly: No disrespect, Dodgers missed the sign

452885.jpg

Mattingly: No disrespect, Dodgers missed the sign

Saturday, April 23, 2011
Posted: 12:43 p.m. Updated: 3:42 p.m.
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Mike Quade rarely veers this far off script. The Cubs manager usually sits in the interview room and stays on his positive message.

But after Fridays 12-2 loss, Quade took a question about his starting pitcher (Casey Coleman) and went in an entirely different direction, wondering why the Los Angeles Dodgers would be running with a seven-run lead.

A.J. Ellis got thrown out at second base in the fifth inning of an 8-1 game. The next morning there was Dodgers manager Don Mattingly talking with Quade during batting practice.

We figured they were going to be irritated, Mattingly said Saturday. We missed the sign.

Mattingly indicated that third-base coach Tim Wallach put the sign on by mistake and then motioned to call it off. Ellis is a 6-foot-2-inch, 224-pound catcher with zero career stolen bases.

I definitely wouldnt run A.J, Mattingly said.

Mattingly also pointed out that Wrigley Field is unpredictable and that the other night his team gave up eight runs in the ninth inning of a 10-1 loss to the Atlanta Braves. You play to win the game.

Quade downplayed a similar incident on April 9 in Milwaukee, where Brewers speedster Carlos Gomez stole second and third with a 5-0 lead. If that violation of baseball code bothered Quade, he didnt let it show too much publicly.

There wasnt much restraint on Friday it definitely burned Quade. It will be fun to watch the manager if he reveals his sarcastic side more often as he grows into the job.

I do think that I probably need a copy of the Milwaukee and L.A. unwritten rules books, Quade said. I dont know if they missed a sign (or) if it was a hit-and-run. I got to brush up on my unwritten rules. There might be an L.A. and Milwaukee version I need to read.

How many runs are too many?

Oh, I dont know, I was just curious, Quade said. I guess 15.
Pitching plans
The Cubs are leaning toward giving James Russell a third spot start rather than promoting someone from the minors for Tuesday night against the Colorado Rockies.

Russell has lasted 5 23 innings in his two starts, giving up nine runs on 14 hits. The 25-year-old left-handers future is in the bullpen, but hes stretched out to around 70 pitches and apparently the Cubs arent overly impressed by the options within their system.

This time the Cubs are going to try to avoid using Russell out of the bullpen in between starts, hoping that will make him more effective.

Fresh arm

Jeff Stevens took the bullet and went 3 13 innings in relief of Coleman on Friday, which essentially made him unavailable for the rest of the weekend. So the Cubs optioned him to Triple-A Iowa on Saturday and recalled right-hander Justin Berg to give them another fresh arm in the bullpen.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Within the first several weeks of the Theo Epstein administration, the Cubs finished second in the Yu Darvish sweepstakes, though nowhere close to the $51.7 million the Texas Rangers bid for the exclusive rights to negotiate a six-year, $60 million deal with the Japanese superstar.

The Cubs will probably have to wait a few more months for their next shot at Darvish, who is “unlikely to move” before the July 31 trade deadline, a source monitoring the situation said Monday. Darvish means enough to the franchise’s bottom line as a box-office draw and magnet for corporate sponsors that the Rangers would be reluctant to trade a player with global appeal and potentially jeopardize that relationship heading into free agency this winter.

Beyond the possible impact on re-signing Darvish, that would also mean foreclosing on a season where Texas is only 2.5 games out of an American League wild-card spot, making this final week critical to the buy-or-sell decision.

The Cubs would obviously prefer to stay out of the rental market after shipping two top prospects to the White Sox in the Jose Quintana deal. Quintana’s reasonable contract – almost $31 million between next season and 2020 once two team options are picked up – creates financial flexibility for a free-agent megadeal (Darvish?) or the next big-time international player.

But the cost of doing business with the White Sox probably means the Cubs wouldn’t have the super-elite prospect to anchor a trade for Darvish, anyway. That would be another obstacle in any possible deal for Sonny Gray, with an AL source saying the New York Yankees are going hard after the Oakland A’s right-hander (and have a deeper farm system and a greater sense of urgency after missing on Quintana).

All that means Kyle Hendricks could function as the trade-deadline addition for the rotation, with the Cubs instead trying to shorten games and deepen their bullpen by July 31.

After spending more than six weeks on the disabled list, the Cubs activated Hendricks for the start of this week’s crosstown series, watching him pitch into the fifth inning of Monday’s 3-1 loss to a White Sox team that had lost nine straight games.

[Willson Contreras may be ‘the f------ Energizer Bunny,’ but Cubs still need to get another catcher before trade deadline]

Hendricks is a rhythm/feel pitcher who blossomed from an overlooked prospect in the Texas system into a piece in the buzzer-beater Ryan Dempster deal at the 2012 deadline into last year’s major-league ERA leader.

Hendricks clearly isn’t locked in yet. He gave up eight hits, but minimized the damage against the White Sox, allowing only one run while putting up five strikeouts against zero walks.

“He wasn’t as normal,” manager Joe Maddon said. “The velocity was still down a little bit. There was not a whole lot of difference between his pitches. He was not what you would call ‘on.’ He would be the first one to tell you that. He looked fine delivery-wise, but the ball just wasn’t coming out as normal.”

Hendricks described his fastball command as “terrible,” called his secondary pitches “OK” and ultimately came to this conclusion: “Health-wise, everything felt great, so we’ll take that. Just got to get back (to my routine).”

The biggest takeaway is Hendricks didn’t feel any lingering effects from the right hand tendinitis that was initially classified as a minor injury in early June. Meaning the Cubs (51-47) are just about at full strength and have another week left to upgrade the defending World Series champs.

Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?

Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?

The crosstown rivalry doesn't end on the diamond.

Both Cubs and White Sox fans are highly competitive when it comes to trivia, too. 

We found that out when we bounced around Wrigley Field to quiz North and South Siders in a special edition of "Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?" 

Watch the video above as we pitted fans against eachother for the chance to win a killer shirt.