Mooney: Byrd believes he has nothing to hide

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Mooney: Byrd believes he has nothing to hide

Wednesday, Feb. 16, 2011
Posted 10:21 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MESA, Ariz. Marlon Byrd pulled his Maserati into the parking lot just before 8 a.m. Wednesday, rap music blasting from the speakers. He showed up ready to work, a man with nothing to hide.

The night before, HBOs Real Sports detailed Byrds relationship with Victor Conte, a name synonymous with steroids. Conte once spent four months in a federal prison. He founded Bay Area Laboratory Co-Operative and ran the steroid ring that ensnared Barry Bonds on perjury charges.

Youre looking at it the wrong way, the Cubs outfielder said Wednesday at Fitch Park. Youre looking at one piece. Youre looking at Victor Conte, BALCO, steroids. Youre not looking at Victor Conte, the guy that invented ZMA.

Nutritional supplements like ZMA are what led Byrd to call Conte in 2008. Byrd remembers receiving an e-mail in return instructing him to try the SNAC (Scientific Nutrition for Advanced Conditioning) line of products.

Byrd said that it took about a year to gain Contes trust. Byrd recalled that Conte didnt want to get in trouble and repeatedly asked: Are you sure you want to do this?

Without hesitation, Byrd spoke with reporters for almost 15 minutes on Wednesday and patiently explained what he thinks is a natural alliance. He had already sat down for a 90-minute interview with HBO because he believes in the training methods.

Supplements (dont) make you Superman. Steroids make you Superman, Byrd said. (Conte) was the top guy in the supplement game before he started doing the steroids. There was nobody better to go to no one because everyone else I go to would be telling me something I already know.

A 2003 profile of Conte written by the San Francisco Chronicle reporters who produced the best-selling book Game of Shadows indicated that Conte hadnt graduated from college and didnt have a professional health or science background.

Major League Baseball has discouraged Byrd, 33, from using Contes products. HBO didnt expose the connections between Byrd and Conte. Yahoo! Sports reported that in detail in 2009, about five months before the Cubs gave Byrd a three-year, 15 million contract.

All Major League Baseball knew when it came out, because I got hit for about two weeks with interviews, Byrd said. Im sure the Cubs knew. They wouldnt have signed me if they had any worries. Im a guy that has a reputation in this game. Im a supplement guy. The Phillies knew it when I was drafted (in 1999). I look the same way as I came in.

Byrd said he has only been part of random drug testing, and not singled out for more screening. He said that while teammates have asked about what he takes, he does not goes out of his way to recommend them, and gives warnings about Contes perception.

I get tested, Byrd said. Major League Baseball knows they can test guys any time they want. Its random. I dont have any worries. I dont think Major League Baseball has any worries. Victors name is what it is. But at some point everyones going to have to move on.

Conte doesnt flinch at a comparison to being the Saddam Hussein of sports.

Byrd, who stands around 6-foot and packs about 230 pounds onto his frame, is believed to be Contes only client on a major-league roster. Theyve hung out socially. Together they attended a UFC bout this month in Las Vegas, to watch Kyle Kingsbury, another athlete aligned with SNAC.

To be honest, he could teach me how to beat the system if he wanted to, Byrd said. But I would have to ask him, and then he would have to put himself in that situation again. Were not going down that road.

Cubs manager Mike Quade was an Oakland As coach in 2000, when BALCO client Jason Giambi won the American League MVP award. Quade knows Byrd the teams only All-Star in 2010 as someone who never wants to be taken out of the lineup and plays hard all the time.

Marlons a huge part of this club and I expect him to take care of his own business, Quade said. I trust my players and I trust him to do whats right and be ready to perform. And hes done nothing but show me that for the time weve been together.

Byrd is all about routine and teammates frequently praise his work ethic, energy and veteran presence.

He ran through the clubhouse Wednesday morning with sunglasses on and his hat backwards. Early in the afternoon, when most of his teammates were already showered and about to leave the complex, he ran sprints on the green outfield grass under the supervision of two Cubs strength coaches.

It was a beautiful day, framed by a clear blue sky, and Byrd refuses to live in the shadows. He understands that he will never get the benefit of the doubt if one test returns a false positive. He has complete faith in Conte.

Its not in the back of my mind, Byrd said. Im not worried about it. All that stuff is clean. He has Olympic athletes he works with. Victor Contes going to make a mistake? Somebody turned him in. Hes not going to make a mistake with the supplements and thats why I dont have to worry about him. Going to GNC (stores)? I have to worry about (that).

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

[PHOTO] Joe Maddon, Miguel Montero patch things up over a drink

[PHOTO] Joe Maddon, Miguel Montero patch things up over a drink

Despite the Cubs ending their 108-year World Series drought, Miguel Montero made offseason headlines for all the wrong reasons when he complained about his role in the Cubs' 2017 championship campaign.

Montero criticized Maddon's communication skills, catching rotation and bullpen decision-making after the team's Grant Park celebration. Maddon brushed off the criticism, and last week at spring training Montero said he hadn't spoke with the Cubs' skipper.

That tension appears to be all but a thing of the past, as Montero posted this picture of him and his manager sharing a drink together sporting nothing but smiles.

It's safe to say Montero would describe his relationship with Maddon now as: #WeAreGood.

Addison Russell planning to become next Cubs superstar

Addison Russell planning to become next Cubs superstar

MESA, Ariz. – Addison Russell earned his manager’s trust by playing “boring” defense, always making the routine plays at shortstop with textbook fundamentals. Even Russell’s agent called him an “old soul,” already serious about his craft and driven by quiet determination and husband-and-father responsibilities.

But the Cubs also know Russell as a moonwalking showman with the freaky athleticism to do Ozzie Smith backflips and make spectacular highlight-reel plays. And you could see the vroom-vroom, fist-pumping celebrations after yet another clutch hit.

“Ever since I was a little kid,” Russell said, “I always wanted to be on the big screen.”

Now Russell will try to make the leap to superstar, as one of the many personalities on a Cubs team that can crossover nationally and live forever in Chicago, just like the ’85 Bears, the way Kris Bryant and Anthony Rizzo have built their brands.

“We got great ballplayers, beautiful faces on this team,” Russell said. “Just talent galore in this clubhouse, and that’s really cool to see, because these guys handle themselves like real, true professionals.”

The start of spring training is a reminder that Russell has still only spent one wire-to-wire season in The Show. He turned 23 last month and has already become a World Series champion, the youngest player in franchise history to start an All-Star Game and the first Cub shortstop to reach 95 RBI since Ernie Banks in 1960.

Russell’s World Series grand slam helped him accumulate the most postseason RBI (14) in club history – after putting up 11 game-winning RBI for a 103-win team. FanGraphs also had Russell tying San Francisco’s Brandon Crawford for the major-league lead with 19 defensive runs saved at shortstop.

“Really, the sky’s the limit,” manager Joe Maddon said. “This guy is scratching the surface. He is that good. Know thyself – I think that’s what’s happening with a lot of our young guys. They’re understanding themselves better. And as they do, their game’s going to continue to improve.

“So with Addie, listen, he could be an annual All-Star, there’s no question. Beyond that, he’s just such a gifted athlete, so quick, and he cares so much. And he’s really turned out to be a good self-evaluator, so all those are components to creating a superstar.”

Russell said he’s working with Boras Corp. on potential endorsements with Pepsi and Audi. He visited a Nike headquarters in Oregon to help design his custom cleats and custom glove. He also posted images from the White House on his social-media accounts, which have nearly 549,000 followers combined between Twitter and Instagram.

“The opportunities are coming, which is great,” Russell said. “It’s a whole new playing field. I’m glad that I’m getting to see a different side of baseball, where I can actually find a couple talents off the baseball field. It’s all interesting stuff.”

It’s also taken some getting used to, as he almost had trouble remembering how many “Addison Russell Days” there were in Florida, between events at Pace High School and with the Santa Rosa Board of County Commissioners.

“This whole fame thing is really new to me,” Russell said. “Walking everywhere, people want autographs and stuff. Different airports, different cities, it’s very humbling. It’s a great blessing. I’m just a small-town guy, so it hit me pretty hard.”

Like the moment Russell realized what the Cubs just did, after the whirlwind of riding in the championship parade down Lake Shore Drive and Michigan Avenue, standing on stage in front of millions at the Grant Park rally and going to Disney World.

“I remember this past offseason, going into my mom’s room and laying down on her bed,” Russell said. “That’s when all the memories of this past year – all the way from spring training (to) the All-Star Game and then the World Series run – it all hit me at once. It was overbearing, kind of, and I started crying.

“That’s when it sunk in. It was just a magical moment.”