Mooney: Cubs model will be building from within

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Mooney: Cubs model will be building from within

Wednesday, Oct. 27, 2010
7:20 PM
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

In a letter sent to season-ticket holders on Oct. 8, Tom Ricketts highlighted two men who could walk through OHare International Airport without being noticed by Cubs fans.

Ricketts praised Tim Wilken as one of the best scouting directors in baseball. The chairman also credited vice president of player personnel Oneri Fleita for a minor-league system that went 374-316. Only the St. Louis Cardinals finished with a higher overall winning percentage among their farm clubs in 2010.

In style and tone, it distanced Ricketts from the wealthy owner thinking of himself as a master of the universe. There will be days in the future where he stands in the Wrigley Field stadium club next to the free agent holding up a new Cubs jersey as the flashbulbs pop all around them.

But a purchase that took his family several years to complete was finalized on Oct. 27, 2009. One year later, looking back on a deal that cost more than 800 million, its become clear that the model will be to build the Cubs from within.

Remember that the next time someone wishes on Cliff Lee coming to Chicago.

Thats not to say its impossible. Just that it sounds out of character for the Cubs to win a bidding war between the New York Yankees and Texas Rangers for a pitcher who will turn 33 next season and is probably looking for a contract that compares to CC Sabathias seven-year, 161 million deal.

In his state-of-the-team address, Ricketts mentioned Wilken and Fleita before Jim Hendry, though both are deeply connected to the Cubs general manager.

Wilken who joined the organization almost five years ago grew up with Hendry in Dunedin, Fla., and his first-round picks are finally beginning to show in Chicago. Fleita who oversees the minor-league affiliates and international operations played for Hendry at Creighton University.

Looking at the big picture, they will be just as important as manager Mike Quade, if not more influential. Even Quade who managed 17 seasons in the minors and four at Triple-A Iowa fits into the vision of promoting from within and becoming more cost-effective.

A letter that ran 28 paragraphs contained no reference to Lou Piniella, Carlos Zambrano, Ryan Dempster or Alfonso Soriano. Ricketts did point to Starlin Castro, Tyler Colvin, Andrew Cashner and Casey Coleman.

All need to take the next step in 2011, but we are very encouraged to have a group of young, homegrown players emerge as regulars in 2010, Ricketts wrote. It is my strong belief that, in the end, it is organizations with strong farm systems that win championships and I am convinced that our organization is making progress (in) what had been a weak spot.

The baseball operations department will assemble for organizational meetings next week in Arizona. The offseason agenda could include: an established starting pitcher to account for Ted Lillys 200 innings; a first baseman to replace Derrek Lee in the middle of the order; andor a veteran reliever to stabilize the bullpen.

Ownership has indicated there will probably be a drop from the payroll level on Opening Day 2010 approximately 145 million and financial commitments for next season begin around 125 million.

But the overall baseball budget is supposed to remain the same. The expectation is that whatever funds are cut from the major-league payroll will be diverted to amateur signings, international scouting and minor-league infrastructure.

The development process has already begun. By sometime in 2011, the homegrown core could include three-fifths of the rotation (Zambrano, Coleman and Randy Wells), the back end of the bullpen (Cashner, Sean Marshall and Carlos Marmol) and several key position players (Castro, Colvin and Geovany Soto).

Privately, the Cubs are hoping that outfielder Brett Jackson, a 2009 first-round pick, could have an impact next year. They look at Wilkens track record after his involvement in the signings of Roy Halladay, Chris Carpenter, Carlos Delgado and Alex Rios during his 25 seasons with the Toronto Blue Jays.

There will likely be several versions of the blueprint. Before reaching their first World Series game in franchise history on Wednesday night, the Rangers cycled in and out of rebuilding phases.

At the 2007 deadline, Texas dealt Mark Teixeira to the Atlanta Braves for a package that yielded an All-Star shortstop (Elvis Andrus) and an All-Star closer (Neftali Feliz). Three years later, the Rangers traded four prospects to get Lee, perhaps the most clutch postseason pitcher of his generation.

The San Francisco Giants invested almost 200 million in three players Barry Zito, Aaron Rowand and Mark DeRosa who were nonfactors as they won the National League pennant.

But the Giants had insurance after developing four good starters and a dominant closer Tim Lincecum, Matt Cain, Jonathan Sanchez, Madison Bumgarner and Brian Wilson. They found inexpensive help for their lineup with Aubrey Huff and Pat Burrell.

Ricketts can be patient because there is a belief his family will own the team for generations. Ownership has also shown that it will be rational, analyzing five million data points before finding out where supply meets demand and setting ticket prices for next season.

But the system cant carry an entire 25-man roster. Just ask the Rangers or Giants. The Cubs will need to get creative before being able to send out invoices for playoff tickets.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Theo Epstein keeps the band together with Cubs extending Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod

Theo Epstein keeps the band together with Cubs extending Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod

PITTSBURGH — Theo Epstein namedropped Eddie Vedder in the middle of last year’s champagne-soaked celebration at Wrigley Field, comparing a Cubs team that won 97 games and bounced the St. Louis Cardinals from the playoffs to a band that bursts onto the scene and blows up with an amazing first album. It would only get more complicated, with expectations changing and the Cubs now having to deal with success, the egos and the backlash.

Whatever happens in October — either the franchise’s first World Series title since 1908 or a massive disappointment — Epstein will get to keep the band together and have his friends around for future Pearl Jam concerts at Wrigley Field.

General manager Jed Hoyer will also get a five-year contract extension to match the timeline of the team president’s new deal, which chairman Tom Ricketts announced before Wednesday night’s 8-4 loss to the Pittsburgh Pirates at PNC Park. Jason McLeod, the senior vice president of scouting and player development already under contract for two more years, will also be extended through the 2021 season.

“When you have great leadership at the top, it normally filters into the rest of the group,” manager Joe Maddon said. “Every successful organization has that. We have that.

“It doesn’t happen everywhere. It’s not like this everywhere, the way it’s been built, the attention to detail. It’s not just numbers. There’s a very human side to all this. It’s a great balance.”

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Management’s 2021 timeframe matches up with All-Star talents Anthony Rizzo, Kris Bryant and Addison Russell, who all remain under club control through that year, along with Kyle Schwarber and Javier Baez, part of a 20-something cast that now also includes Jason Heyward, Willson Contreras and Albert Almora Jr.

Epstein, Hoyer and McLeod had all won World Series rings with the Boston Red Sox and saw how New England responded to the 2004 team that ended an 86-year drought. They decided to reunite in the fall of 2011, with Hoyer taking on some of Epstein’s out-front, day-to-day responsibilities and dealing with the executives and agents he knew better. McLeod — who recently interviewed for a top job with the Minnesota Twins that will reportedly go to Cleveland Indians executive Derek Falvey — should continue to be linked to just about every GM job that opens.

“I see this contract, this show of faith from the Ricketts (family) in me as a validation of everybody,” Epstein said. “The contract is really a product of all the hard work that literally hundreds of people have performed to make this a healthier and better baseball operation, from Jed and Jason and Randy (Bush) and Shiraz (Rehman) and Scott (Harris) to all the guys in scouting and player development and the R&D team, the guys behind the scenes.

“Of course, (it’s) Joe and his staff and the players doing a remarkable job on the field at the big-league level the last couple years. So this is a product of everybody’s hard work, and I accept it kind of on their behalf. The strength and stability that we have now is a reflection of what happens when there’s trust, teamwork, transparency from a lot of talented people working together, starting from the very top with the Ricketts family.”

Five more years: Theo Epstein signs massive contract extension with Cubs

Five more years: Theo Epstein signs massive contract extension with Cubs

PITTSBURGH — Theo Epstein understood the optics of how he once escaped Fenway Park in a gorilla suit, walking away from his dream job with the Boston Red Sox. Winning two World Series titles couldn’t stop the personality conflicts or the competing agendas or an epic collapse at the end of the 2011 season.

But Epstein never wanted to make that kind of power play here, not with the Cubs on the verge of what could be a historic run through October and a potential dynasty, not after leaving the Boston bubble and feeling a sense of renewal in Chicago, where his young family lives a few blocks from Wrigley Field.

Epstein signing a massive five-year contract extension seemed inevitable, no matter that it took until Sept. 28 for the Cubs to finally make the announcement.

While $50 million guaranteed is said to be an overestimate, it’s believed to be in the team president’s range, given the bonus potential — presumably through metrics like attendance and playoff appearances — and the sense that Andrew Friedman’s deal with the Los Angeles Dodgers could be worth $45 million.

“There was never any real drama,” chairman Tom Ricketts said Wednesday, sitting in PNC Park’s visiting dugout before a game against the Pittsburgh Pirates. “Honestly, we sat down in spring training, had a nice dinner and talked about it. I basically told him I thought he was the best in the game at what he did. And he told me that no matter what I paid him, he wasn’t going to leave Chicago, so we were off to a good start.”

After a series of meetings through the summer, Epstein and Ricketts hammered out the final details over the weekend inside the team’s Wrigleyville headquarters and initially planned to hold the press conference on Sunday, but that felt wrong once they found out Miami Marlins pitcher Jose Fernandez died in a boat crash, leaving the industry in mourning.

Epstein’s contract does not include an equity stake in a franchise now valued at more than $2 billion. Two of his closest advisors — general manager Jed Hoyer and scouting/player-development chief Jason McLeod — will also get extensions through the 2021 season.

“When we had dinner in spring training, (Tom) started it off by saying some really nice things about me that might have hurt his leverage a little bit,” Epstein said. “And then I returned the favor by telling him that even if we couldn’t work out a contract, it would get awkward because I would still just keep showing up to work as an employee at will, ruining my leverage, so that was a nice way to start the negotiation. Really, the entire process reflected that spirit.”

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It hasn’t been an uninterrupted honeymoon period since Epstein bolted from Boston and signed a five-year, $18.5 million contract in October 2011. The Epstein regime fired three managers before hiring Joe Maddon, who used an out-clause that triggered when Friedman left the Tampa Bay Rays for Los Angeles after the 2014 season. The Cubs continually faced questions about spending like a big-market team — signing Jon Lester to a $155 million megadeal that winter required financial gymnastics and using money left over from losing the Masahiro Tanaka sweepstakes.

But from the ashes of a 101-loss season in 2012, the Cubs methodically built a 101-win team this year through: executing shrewd trades for an All-Star first baseman (Anthony Rizzo), All-Star shortstop (Addison Russell), last year’s Cy Young Award winner (Jake Arrieta) and an emerging ace (Kyle Hendricks); drafting a leading MVP candidate (Kris Bryant); and going on a free-agent spending spree that approached $290 million (John Lackey, Ben Zobrist, Jason Heyward, Dexter Fowler).

“They’ve given me great freedom to operate within baseball operations,” Epstein said of the Ricketts family. “They’ve given me the resources that we’ve needed to make this baseball operation healthier and thrive. It’s everything I could have ever asked for. So there’s no place I’d rather be. I think I said five years ago it’s a great day to be a Cub. I still feel that way. I still envision feeling that way for the foreseeable future.”

In leaving the Red Sox, Epstein quoted football legend Bill Walsh, referencing his belief that coaches and executives shouldn’t spend more than a decade in one job, or else risk burnout or becoming stale.

“I don’t know” if this will be the last contract in Chicago, Epstein said. “It was 10 years in Boston, and that certainly seemed like the right amount of time there. I do really believe in a lot of what Walsh was writing about.

“But it’s too early to judge. We’ll see how I feel at that point. Certainly, there’s some symmetry to 10 years. But it’s just too early. So many things can happen between now and then. I’m really not thinking beyond trying to win a World Series for this organization.”

When Epstein first met Ricketts in New York at the family’s spectacular residence overlooking Central Park, the Cubs had just lost 91 games, the second of five straight fifth-place finishes — and the beginning of what could be a golden age of baseball on the North Side.

“A lot of people have this perception — I know I was sort of in that camp — that he was more of a deeply quantitative number-cruncher kind of guy,” Ricketts said. “And that’s true. Obviously, Theo understands numbers. He understands how to apply them to make good decisions.

“But I think the thing that I’ve seen the last five years — which is even more remarkable — is how well he handles people. How well he chooses players for his team — and his ability to judge character and put together the right human resources together on the same team — has been truly remarkable.”