Mooney: Marlon Byrd refuses to slow down

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Mooney: Marlon Byrd refuses to slow down

Tuesday, March 22, 2011
Posted: 9:06 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

GLENDALE, Ariz. Marlon Byrd started boxing this winter as a way to stay in shape and reduce the stress on his legs. His career shows that he knows how to take a punch.

This used to be the time of year where Byrd had to prove himself all over again, to fight for a roster spot or at-bats as the fourth outfielder. He was once the gym rat who needed odd jobs in the offseason to make money working at a golf resort, as a bouncer at a bar, delivering cabinets up and down Floridas Gulf coast.

You name it, I probably did it, Byrd said, other than (pumping) gas.

Byrd can flash a big smile, but he also brings a hard edge to the clubhouse, and maybe thats something the Cubs need. Finally, at the age of 33, he doesnt have to worry about the depth chart or introduce himself to a new city and a different group of teammates.

As Byrd said, This is the first year knowing, Hey, youre our center fielder and youre going to play every day.

Maybe thats why Byrd doesnt take much for granted. He vows to go hard for all nine innings. He trains as if hes going to play in all 162 games and into October.

It has to be reassuring for a player who spent parts of seven consecutive seasons on the Triple-A level before having a breakout year with the Texas Rangers in 2009. That earned him a three-year, 15 million contract and the platform he used to become an All-Star in 2010.

Thats not what drives me, Byrd said. What drives me is trying to get better every year. You pick apart (the) season that you had. Everybody knows my second half I wasnt happy with it.

Byrds batting average dropped 56 points to .261 and he generated only three homers and 26 RBI after the first half. He also points to his homeroad splits (.271.315) and says he needs to play better at Wrigley Field and be more prepared for all the day games.

Byrd has dropped around 15 pounds and plans to play at 225. Hes hitting .478 this spring and understands that will come with suspicions because of his association with Victor Conte. He already addressed it with the media and Major League Baseball in 2009. He hasnt ducked the topic ever since.

In a recent group interview, Byrd called out a beat writer by name, jokingpredicting that the reporter will bring it up if he has 20 homers by the All-Star break.

You guys are going to ask me questions about it all the time, Byrd said. Its always going to be scrutinized. Victors the black cloud over baseball, so everybody knows about the BALCO issues. Everybody knows that I work with him.

We try to move forward. Again, when I put up good numbers some people are going to say certain things. But that happens with any guy that comes out of the woodwork.

Byrd is obsessed with his routine and ways to improve. Young players often seek him out for advice on how to prepare.

He is someone who didnt truly enjoy success until relatively late in his career. He wants to play until the age of 38, which would take him through the 2015 season, or three years beyond his current contract.

Byrd never wants to sit on the bench. If that caused any friction with manager Mike Quade late last season, he didnt let it show too much. They came to an understanding.

He knows I was one of those guys that he didnt have to worry about, Byrd said. There were certain days Id walk in, hed look at me and hed shake his head.

I shook my head (back) at him and I wouldnt be in the lineup, but Q knows the type of player I am. Im his type of guy.

Byrd still has friends in the Rangers clubhouse and he keeps a home near Philadelphia, where he first broke into the big leagues. He went to playoff games at Citizens Bank Park last year, and watched the Rangers on television, right up to the point they started celebrating.

It was a little sad seeing what he missed out on, but also time to get back to work.

Every year Im going to try to keep finding out whats going to make me better as I get older, Byrd said. You dont know what it takes at 23. You know what it takes at 33 to get ready for a season.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Kyle Hendricks is back, but Cubs will likely have to wait for their next shot at Yu Darvish

Within the first several weeks of the Theo Epstein administration, the Cubs finished second in the Yu Darvish sweepstakes, though nowhere close to the $51.7 million the Texas Rangers bid for the exclusive rights to negotiate a six-year, $60 million deal with the Japanese superstar.

The Cubs will probably have to wait a few more months for their next shot at Darvish, who is “unlikely to move” before the July 31 trade deadline, a source monitoring the situation said Monday. Darvish means enough to the franchise’s bottom line as a box-office draw and magnet for corporate sponsors that the Rangers would be reluctant to trade a player with global appeal and potentially jeopardize that relationship heading into free agency this winter.

Beyond the possible impact on re-signing Darvish, that would also mean foreclosing on a season where Texas is only 2.5 games out of an American League wild-card spot, making this final week critical to the buy-or-sell decision.

The Cubs would obviously prefer to stay out of the rental market after shipping two top prospects to the White Sox in the Jose Quintana deal. Quintana’s reasonable contract – almost $31 million between next season and 2020 once two team options are picked up – creates financial flexibility for a free-agent megadeal (Darvish?) or the next big-time international player.

But the cost of doing business with the White Sox probably means the Cubs wouldn’t have the super-elite prospect to anchor a trade for Darvish, anyway. That would be another obstacle in any possible deal for Sonny Gray, with an AL source saying the New York Yankees are going hard after the Oakland A’s right-hander (and have a deeper farm system and a greater sense of urgency after missing on Quintana).

All that means Kyle Hendricks could function as the trade-deadline addition for the rotation, with the Cubs instead trying to shorten games and deepen their bullpen by July 31.

After spending more than six weeks on the disabled list, the Cubs activated Hendricks for the start of this week’s crosstown series, watching him pitch into the fifth inning of Monday’s 3-1 loss to a White Sox team that had lost nine straight games.

[Willson Contreras may be ‘the f------ Energizer Bunny,’ but Cubs still need to get another catcher before trade deadline]

Hendricks is a rhythm/feel pitcher who blossomed from an overlooked prospect in the Texas system into a piece in the buzzer-beater Ryan Dempster deal at the 2012 deadline into last year’s major-league ERA leader.

Hendricks clearly isn’t locked in yet. He gave up eight hits, but minimized the damage against the White Sox, allowing only one run while putting up five strikeouts against zero walks.

“He wasn’t as normal,” manager Joe Maddon said. “The velocity was still down a little bit. There was not a whole lot of difference between his pitches. He was not what you would call ‘on.’ He would be the first one to tell you that. He looked fine delivery-wise, but the ball just wasn’t coming out as normal.”

Hendricks described his fastball command as “terrible,” called his secondary pitches “OK” and ultimately came to this conclusion: “Health-wise, everything felt great, so we’ll take that. Just got to get back (to my routine).”

The biggest takeaway is Hendricks didn’t feel any lingering effects from the right hand tendinitis that was initially classified as a minor injury in early June. Meaning the Cubs (51-47) are just about at full strength and have another week left to upgrade the defending World Series champs.

Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?

Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?

The crosstown rivalry doesn't end on the diamond.

Both Cubs and White Sox fans are highly competitive when it comes to trivia, too. 

We found that out when we bounced around Wrigley Field to quiz North and South Siders in a special edition of "Are You Smarter than a Cubs/White Sox Fan?" 

Watch the video above as we pitted fans against eachother for the chance to win a killer shirt.