Mooney: Marmol vows to live up to his contract


Mooney: Marmol vows to live up to his contract

Tuesday, March 8, 2011
4:19 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. Carlos Marmol knows that he is a target, because of where he plays and the nature of his work. The Cubs believe that hes perfectly suited for the job. The sellout crowds at Wrigley Field will hang on every slider.

I hate when they boo me. I really hate it, Marmol said. Yeah, I know, (its going to happen). But sometimes we dont deserve that, because were not perfect. Were going to make mistakes and blow a save.

(But) I like the energy of the fans. I like to be in that position. It makes me work a little more.

WATCH: Byrd feeling World Series?

This is Marmols first spring as an established closer. Kerry Wood is setting up for him now, and he has the security of a new 20 million deal. But he does not want you to think hes changed.

I concentrate (on) the season, Marmol said. I dont worry about money. I dont worry about anything else. He then cleared his throat and announced: I want to get another contract, man!

Marmol, 28, often punctuates his thoughts with laughter, like when he curses at a teammate in the middle of the clubhouse, or demands the 10-year Albert Pujols extension, or responds to a question about how many saves he thinks he can get this year.

Sixty! he joked.

That seems unreachable, but Marmol did save 38 of the Cubs 75 wins last season, when he would sometimes go weeks between chances. On a decent team with what looks like a much improved bullpen, its reasonable to think that he could approach 50 saves.

Marmol will be motivated because his three-year deal runs through 2013 and he is positioned to become a free agent at age 31. With his newfound wealth, hes planning to take out all the Latin players from the minor-league system for a nice dinner one night this month.

Who told you that? Marmol wondered.

Marmol wasnt broadcasting the information. He has humble roots. He was only a 16-year-old kid when he first signed with the Cubs out of the Dominican Republic. And eventually he had to be talked into converting from catcher.

Marmol can usually be found in the clubhouse with his chair tilted back, his legs leaning up against his locker. Closing here is not the same as in Kansas City or Miami or Pittsburgh.

Hes got a good makeup for his role, no doubt, Wood said. You dont really have a choice in that position. Youre going to be in there the next day. You got to be ready to go. Its easier said than done, but (you) got to be the same guy every day.

Across the past three years, Marmol has appeared in 82, 79 and 77 games. Since the start of the 2007 season, he leads all major-league relievers with 441 strikeouts and a .154 batting average against.

Hes a gamer, reliever John Grabow said. You never hear him complain. He takes the ball every day.

Since taking over as Cubs closer in August 2009, Marmol has converted 49 of 54 save opportunities, which translates to a 91 percent success rate.

After Marmols long-anticipated extension was announced on Feb. 14, Mike Quade walked into the media workroom at Fitch Park and said he didnt want any flowers: Was that a Valentines Day gift or what?

There are few greater comforts for a manager than a closer he trusts in the ninth inning. Sure, Marmol will walk some guys on the way to the 25th, 26th and 27th outs of the game. But that is also what makes him so dangerous, and keeps hitters off-balance.

We all know when hes locked in hes fun to watch, maybe more exciting than you want sometimes, Quade said. (But) I believed from Day 1 that contract status was not going to matter to him. Hes a young guy who loves to pitch and loves (getting) the ball. I just dont see that changing.

PatrickMooney is's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Why Joe Maddon chose Albert Almora Jr. over Jason Heyward in huge Game 6 for Cubs

Why Joe Maddon chose Albert Almora Jr. over Jason Heyward in huge Game 6 for Cubs

With the chance to book their first trip to the World Series since 1945, the Cubs benched the player with the biggest contract in franchise history and started a 22-year-old rookie who began this season at Triple-A Iowa.

Now that says something about Clayton Kershaw’s overall brilliance and Albert Almora Jr.’s precocious nature, but it also again spotlights Jason Heyward’s offensive spiral during the first year of that $184 million megadeal.  

Heyward’s Gold Glove defense in right field, well-rounded skills and clubhouse intangibles certainly helped the Cubs get to this point – up 3-2 on the Los Angeles Dodgers in the National League Championship Series – but manager Joe Maddon wanted to go in a different direction for Saturday’s Game 6 at Wrigley Field.   

“Kershaw’s pretty good,” Maddon said. “You look at his numbers, he’s been absurd versus lefties, (so you) get another right-handed bat out there and the way Albert can play defense really makes it a little bit easier.

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]

“If we didn’t have the opportunity to do something differently tonight I wouldn’t have. But we do. Albert just presents well at the plate – and well on defense – to the point where I thought we needed to give it a go.”

Almora – the first player the Theo Epstein regime drafted here with the sixth overall pick in 2012 – could be the 2017 Opening Day starter in center field if Dexter Fowler cashes in elsewhere as a free agent.

After posting career lows in homers (seven) and OPS (.631) during the regular season, Heyward has gone 2-for-28 (.071 average) in the playoffs and will probably need to reboot during the winter.

“I’m sure there’s going to be a lot of internal work done in the offseason with him, no question,” Maddon said. “You know he’s not satisfied with the year. (But) he was a big part of our 100-plus wins this year.

“It is something that he has to work on – and he will work on it – but by no means is anybody giving up on him. He just needs to probably clear his mind a little bit when this is all said and done and get back to the drawing board.”

Cubs hoping Kyle Schwarber can make World Series comeback

Cubs hoping Kyle Schwarber can make World Series comeback

As if the possibility of clinching their first National League pennant in 71 years didn’t create enough drama and excitement in Wrigleyville, the Cubs have sent Kyle Schwarber to the Arizona Fall League, hoping he can add another chapter to his October legend.
Schwarber earned this chance after beating every expectation in his recovery from major surgery on his left knee in April. The Cubs haven’t ruled anything in or out – and still need to beat the Los Angeles Dodgers one more time this weekend – but they want to see how he responds on Saturday with the Mesa Solar Sox and ultimately decide if he would be a viable designated-hitter option for the World Series.
Schwarber gained clearance on Monday from Dr. Daniel Cooper, the head team physician for the Dallas Cowboys who reconstructed his ACL and repaired his LCL after a devastating outfield collision during the first week of the regular season. Schwarber immediately phoned president of baseball operations Theo Epstein after the six-month checkup.   
“I wasn’t expecting the call,” Epstein said. “We got news that was beyond better than we could have expected by any reasonable standard. 
“He asked for a chance to do this. And with as hard as Kyle has worked and as much as this means to him – and potentially to us – we wanted to give him that opportunity.”

[SHOP: Buy a "Try Not to Suck" shirt with proceeds benefiting Joe Maddon's Respect 90 Foundation & other Cubs Charities]
Schwarber flew from Dallas to Los Angeles, where he hit in the cage at Dodger Stadium that night. As the Cubs continued with what has been a classic NL Championship Series, Schwarber hit again on Tuesday and then left for Arizona on Wednesday to ramp up his baseball activities and prove whether or not he could again be a difference-maker in October.
Schwarber, the No. 4 overall pick in the 2014 draft out of Indiana University, generated 16 home runs in 69 games last season and then set a franchise record with five homers in the playoffs. 

The Cubs still have to deal with Clayton Kershaw on Saturday night in Game 6, and judge whether or not this layoff is too long, even for one of their best young hitters, especially against what would be a dynamic Cleveland Indians pitching staff.
But the Cubs would also never bet against Schwarber.

“We’ll see where this goes,” Epstein said. “We’re not getting ahead of ourselves. We have a lot of work to do here before this becomes pertinent. But it’s a testament to how hard Kyle has worked to even be in this position where it’s a possibility.”