Chicago Cubs

Quade acts like he doesnt feel the heat

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Quade acts like he doesnt feel the heat

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011Posted: 12:45 p.m. Updated: 5:30 p.m.

By PatrickMooney
CSNChicago.com CubsInsider Follow @CSNMooney
Mike Quade presented himself as someone who likes to take a moment. Hed scan the rooftops, soak in the scene and reflect on the long journey that brought him here.

But as reporters poked around on Wednesday for quotes to use in their obituaries for this lost season, the Cubs manager wouldnt play along with the line of questioning. Quade refused to get sentimental and admit that this could be his final game at Wrigley Field.

Dont think about it. Dont believe it. Lets play ball, Quade said. Im going to be back. Why would I look at it any other way?

The calculus certainly changed when Jim Hendry got fired. The people who work with Quade watched the press conference. They noticed that chairman Tom Ricketts didnt endorse the coaching staff the way he did others in the front office, saying those decisions would be up to the next general manager.

A new administration is about to come into power at Clark and Addison. That executive will be free to hire his own manager.

Nothing I can do about that, Quade said. I dont see any reason to look at it any other way. Im not going to wax nostalgic. I plan to be back. And I plan to do a good job next year.

Quade hasnt spoken with Ricketts about his job status yet, though the chairman was spotted in the clubhouse walking toward the managers office after Wednesdays 7-1 victory over the Brewers.

If they make a decision in a different direction, so be it, Quade said.

Quade is eternally optimistic. Thats how he beat the long odds and rose to this position. Thats why he says things like Im not a lunatic and announces that the Cubs are still in the playoff hunt, even when theyre 18 games under .500.

It seems hard to believe that less than a year ago Quade rode the momentum of a 24-13 finish and landed his dream job. A baseball lifer who spent so much time in the shadows suddenly became the story.

The Prospect High School graduate had moved all over the world to advance his career, coaching 19 seasons in the minors and managing winter ball in the Dominican Republic.

This time, Quade was given pieces that didnt quite fit together, aging veterans who were getting paid for past performance and young players who didnt show the progress the organization promised.

The Cubs have played hard and maintained a sense of professionalism through a difficult season. But the public perception of Quades authority seemed to erode on July 9, when Ryan Dempster got into a shouting match with his manager in the dugout.

All this came at a time when the Cubs were trying to cycle off bad contracts and frame their next window of opportunity. They have too many tickets to sell to publicly call it a bridge year. But they also didnt think that theyd lose around 90 games and finish in fifth place again.

I look at this as a variety of things, Quade said. No one escapes blame and you understand that. But I also look at it as a realist and try and think about the things that I could or couldnt control.

The Cubs couldnt overcome the injuries to Randy Wells and Andrew Cashner during the first week of the season. There went 40 percent of a rotation that didnt live up to expectations. What was supposed to be a shutdown bullpen has blown 23 saves.

Quade also promised to drive home fundamentals, insisting that the Cubs would play the game the right way. They woke up on Wednesday leading the majors with 128 errors.

Thats one disappointment, Quade said. But it wasnt for lack (of) concentration or emphasis on it from the beginning of spring training. So you go back to the drawing board and you look at (why).

Thats the most frustrating thing. If its something that we neglected, then, yeah, the hell with me. When youre working on it and talking about it every day. What else can we say or do?

Those are the kinds of questions the next general manager will be asking.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs are about to find out how Brewers will counter Jose Quintana move

Cubs are about to find out how Brewers will counter Jose Quintana move

MILWAUKEE – It’s nice that the Cubs like their dugout vibe again – except when John Lackey bumps into Anthony Rizzo – and Jose Quintana comes with three additional years of club control and Jake Arrieta says: “We expect to remain in first place.”

But after making it this far – ahead of schedule in a long rebuilding project – the Milwaukee Brewers are not at all conceding the National League Central.

The Cubs experienced a playoff-like environment in late July during Friday night’s 2-1 loss in front of a sellout crowd at Miller Park. Every year is different, the Cubs kept saying during all their stops and starts in the first half, and these next 60 games should feel like a real pennant race, not the cruise-control settings from last season.

How will the Brewers counter the Quintana move? Well, Harvard guy Brent Suter, a 31st-round pick from the 2012 draft, outpitched Quintana, a player the Brewers targeted and discussed in depth with the White Sox before Theo Epstein made his blockbuster deal during the All-Star break.

Cubs manager Joe Maddon sees an American League East-style lineup stocked with patient, powerful hitters, one that has kept the Brewers (55-50) within a half-game of first place, even after last week’s six-game losing streak.

Milwaukee also has an aggressive, involved owner (Mark Attanasio), a 30-something, Ivy League general manager (David Stearns), a top-10 farm system and the reality that chances like this don’t come around that often for small-market franchises with the July 31 trade deadline looming.

“You’re looking at what everybody else is doing,” Maddon said. “We’ve already been proactively in front of some other groups by getting that done. So now anything we can do on top of that in a positive vein, absolutely, is going to benefit us. I don’t doubt that the Brewers are probably going to do something.

“But at the end of the day, we just got to worry about what we’re doing. I think it’s going to be hard to duplicate what we’ve already done in regards to getting Quintana.” 

So much about his new existence is different, but Quintana has seen this movie so many times before with the White Sox, a tough-luck loss where he only gave up two runs in six innings. Jason Heyward also bailed out Quintana in the third inning with a spectacular leaping catch at the right-field wall to take a two-run homer away from Ryan Braun.

“It was a battle,” said Quintana, who is 2-1 with a 2.37 ERA in three starts for the defending World Series champs. “Every game counts. I’m really happy to feel that atmosphere every night when I go to the mound. It was a tough night for me, and we’ll come back tomorrow.”

After Suter limited the Cubs to four singles and a walk during seven scoreless innings, Javier Baez generated all the offense with a John Daly swing. Baez drove a pitch from Anthony Swarzak – the reliever making his Brewer debut after getting traded from the White Sox – off a stadium club window above the second deck in left field.

Baez admired his shot, stared out at the field and spit out a sunflower seed as he slowly began his home-run trot. Part of the crowd of 42,574 started chanting: “Let’s go, Cubbies!” The day before on the South Side, Maddon listened to a question about Arrieta’s prediction and talked about “baseball karma,” saying it’s “out there” and “it’s going to come back and bite you.”

“Milwaukee is not going anywhere,” Maddon said. “I don’t take anything for granted, man. I really approach the day the same all the time. My experience tells me that. If you are not doing that – if you start getting full of yourself and believe in whatever – it’s going to go away real quickly.

“There’s nothing wrong with saying: ‘I feel it. I like where we’re at. I like the way the guys are reacting. I like the energy.’ Those are all good thoughts, good words. But when you start getting full of yourself and thinking it’s going to come easily – that’s the trap.”

Whether or not the Cubs and/or Brewers make a splash on July 31, these two teams will clash nine more times within the next two months.

“It will be cool,” said Kyle Schwarber, who struck out swinging at Corey Knebel’s 97-mph fastball with a runner on third base to end this game. “We’re going to be playing our baseball. We can’t be worried about whatever the division is. We got to worry about ourselves and play our game and go from there.”

Wake-up Call: Jose Quintana picks up first Cubs loss; White Sox lose again

Wake-up Call: Jose Quintana picks up first Cubs loss; White Sox lose again

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