Quade: No Zambrano apology needed

Quade: No Zambrano apology needed

Friday, April 15, 2011
Posted: 9:21 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

DENVER Others in the organization have more power and make more money. But no one who works for the Cubs will talk to the media as much as Mike Quade, and its not even close.

The manager understands that he has to manage the narrative what he says publicly matters in the clubhouse, fans want to know what he thinks and words have consequences.

From high up in the Minute Maid Park press box on Wednesday night, this looked like a serious breach of baseball protocol: Carlos Zambrano walking off the mound before Quade could even get there, then handing off the ball on the infield grass, about halfway toward the third-base line.

Less than 48 hours later, Quade stuck to his story and downplayed the incident, even though Zambrano was compelled to go to the managers office and say sorry immediately after a 9-5 win over the Houston Astros.

If that act offended Quades sensibilities as an old-school baseball guy, he didnt let it show.

I dont really think my ego is so big, Quade said Friday at Coors Field. If hes upset, just dont drop the thing, and I meant (that). I appreciate the apology, but I just didnt think it was that big a deal.

Thats it. I didnt need an apology to make this thing right.

The Cubs knew that Kerry Wood would pay dividends beyond the eighth inning. In this situation the veteran reliever should be credited with a hold or a save. Zambrano had hit his 22nd career homer in the sixth and then watched his five shutout innings evaporate.

When I came in, Woody told me to talk to Quade, Zambrano said. If Woody didnt say anything to me

Zambrano is almost 30 years old and has pitched in nearly 300 major-leagues games. But he sounded genuine when he admitted his mistake and said he didnt realize how far he had wandered off the mound.

There was no hint of Zambrano being defensive, making excuses or pointing fingers.

As a veteran pitcher, I have to be able to command more of myself and command the pitches, Zambrano said. I started the inning aggressive. Thats unacceptable.

To create that culture of accountability, you need guys like Wood, a beat cop patrolling the clubhouse.

Good for them, Quade said. I think those guys can police that kind of stuff more than I have to. Im not going to stomp around. Thats just not what I do.

Heres what Quade has to do: Before every game, there is a media briefing and a separate one-on-one interview with the teams flagship radio station. Postgame, 162 times a year, the manager has to sit there and answer questions and explain what just happened.

Factor in seven weeks of spring training and appearances on local and national radio and television outlets, Quades approaching 1,000 encounters with a microphone in his face.

The reporters come at Quade from all angles. They ask for updates on Kosuke Fukudomes strained hamstring, reactions to the Barry Bonds trial and opinions on instant replay.

Baseball culture doesnt allow Quade to dismiss it as a lower-body injury like Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville. Quade has to account for essentially double the number of players and games as Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau. Quade cant help himself hell never be as boring as Lovie Smith at the Halas Hall podium.

Quade genuinely enjoys the give-and-take with reporters. He watches college basketball and wonders what the hell the coach is thinking, so he figures he cant be exempt from that second-guessing.

But there are limits. Picking a fight with Zambrano in the second week of the season probably isnt worth it. There will no doubt be other fires to put out.

In 17 years as a minor-league manager, and seven more as a big-league coach, Quade developed a thick skin. In this job, hes going to need it.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Jake Arrieta expects Cubs to have the best rotation in baseball

Jake Arrieta expects Cubs to have the best rotation in baseball

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Jake Arrieta is a Cy Young Award winner who won't get the Opening Night assignment. John Lackey is a No. 3 starter already fitted for his third World Series ring. Kyle Hendricks led the majors with a 2.13 ERA last year and won't start until the fifth game of this season.  

Do you feel like this is the best rotation in baseball?

"We're up there, yeah," Arrieta said after homering off Zack Greinke during Thursday afternoon's 5-5 tie with the Arizona Diamondbacks at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick. "I think on paper – and with what we've actually done on the field – it's tough to not say that.

"We like the guys we have. People can rank them, but time will tell. Once we get out there the first four or five times through the rotation, I think you can probably put a stamp on it then, more so than now. 

"But, yeah, we stack up just as well as anybody out there, for sure."  

Arrieta made it through five innings against the Diamondbacks, giving up three runs and eight hits in what figures to be his second-to-last Cactus League tune-up before facing the St. Louis Cardinals at Busch Stadium on April 4. 

The New York Mets blew away Cubs hitters with their power pitching and game-planning during that 2015 National League Championship Series sweep. The Washington Nationals are trying to keep Max Scherzer and Stephen Strasburg healthy and already watched Tanner Roark deliver for Team USA in the World Baseball Classic. 

The Cubs dreaded the idea of facing Johnny Cueto in a possible elimination game at Wrigley Field last October. The Los Angeles Dodgers almost became a matchup nightmare for the Cubs with lefties Clayton Kershaw and Rich Hill during the 2016 NLCS.

But slotting Hendricks at No. 5 – five months after he started a World Series Game 7 – is a luxury few contenders can afford. 

"That just speaks to our length in the rotation," Arrieta said, "and being able to keep relievers out of the game, longer than most teams. That's a big deal, especially when you get into July and August. 

"Obviously, Kyle could be a 1 or 2 just about anywhere. Not that he's not here. We've got several of those, which is a good problem to have. It's going to be favorable for us when there's a No. 4 or No. 5 guy in our rotation going up against somebody else's. Our chances are really good, especially with our lineup." 

Arrieta talked up No. 4 starter Brett Anderson as "a little bit like Hendricks from the left side" in terms of his preparation, cerebral nature and spin rate, a combination that makes him an X-factor for this rotation and an organization starved for pitching beyond 2017. 

The if-healthy disclaimer always comes with Anderson, who played with Arrieta on the 2008 Olympic team and has been on the disabled list nine times since then. Coming out of high school, Arrieta initially signed to play for Anderson's father, Frank, the Oklahoma State University coach at the time, before going in a different direction in a career that wouldn't truly take off until he got to Chicago. 

"We're all looking forward to seeing how we pick up where we left off," Arrieta said. "Judging by what we've done this spring and the shape guys are in and the health – I don't see any reason we can't jump out to an early lead like we did last year and sustain it throughout the entire season."
 

Cubs Talk Podcast: The making of Reign Men

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Cubs Talk Podcast: The making of Reign Men

In the latest Cubs Talk Podcast, Kelly Crull sits down with CSN executive producers Ryan McGuffey and Sarah Lauch, the creators of 'Reign Men: The Story Behind Game 7 of the 2016 World Series, which premieres March 27 at 9:30 p.m. on CSN.

McGuffey and Lauch share their experience making the 52-minute documentary as they sifted through hours of sound from the likes of Joe Maddon, Theo Epstein, Jason Heyward, Anthony Rizzo and more recapping one of the greatest baseball games ever played.

Plus, hear a sneak peak of 'Reign Men’ as Heyward and Epstein describe their perspective of the Rajai Davis game-tying homer and that brief rain delay that led to Heyward’s epic speech.

Check out the latest Cubs Talk Podcast right here: