Quade: No Zambrano apology needed

Quade: No Zambrano apology needed

Friday, April 15, 2011
Posted: 9:21 p.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

DENVER Others in the organization have more power and make more money. But no one who works for the Cubs will talk to the media as much as Mike Quade, and its not even close.

The manager understands that he has to manage the narrative what he says publicly matters in the clubhouse, fans want to know what he thinks and words have consequences.

From high up in the Minute Maid Park press box on Wednesday night, this looked like a serious breach of baseball protocol: Carlos Zambrano walking off the mound before Quade could even get there, then handing off the ball on the infield grass, about halfway toward the third-base line.

Less than 48 hours later, Quade stuck to his story and downplayed the incident, even though Zambrano was compelled to go to the managers office and say sorry immediately after a 9-5 win over the Houston Astros.

If that act offended Quades sensibilities as an old-school baseball guy, he didnt let it show.

I dont really think my ego is so big, Quade said Friday at Coors Field. If hes upset, just dont drop the thing, and I meant (that). I appreciate the apology, but I just didnt think it was that big a deal.

Thats it. I didnt need an apology to make this thing right.

The Cubs knew that Kerry Wood would pay dividends beyond the eighth inning. In this situation the veteran reliever should be credited with a hold or a save. Zambrano had hit his 22nd career homer in the sixth and then watched his five shutout innings evaporate.

When I came in, Woody told me to talk to Quade, Zambrano said. If Woody didnt say anything to me

Zambrano is almost 30 years old and has pitched in nearly 300 major-leagues games. But he sounded genuine when he admitted his mistake and said he didnt realize how far he had wandered off the mound.

There was no hint of Zambrano being defensive, making excuses or pointing fingers.

As a veteran pitcher, I have to be able to command more of myself and command the pitches, Zambrano said. I started the inning aggressive. Thats unacceptable.

To create that culture of accountability, you need guys like Wood, a beat cop patrolling the clubhouse.

Good for them, Quade said. I think those guys can police that kind of stuff more than I have to. Im not going to stomp around. Thats just not what I do.

Heres what Quade has to do: Before every game, there is a media briefing and a separate one-on-one interview with the teams flagship radio station. Postgame, 162 times a year, the manager has to sit there and answer questions and explain what just happened.

Factor in seven weeks of spring training and appearances on local and national radio and television outlets, Quades approaching 1,000 encounters with a microphone in his face.

The reporters come at Quade from all angles. They ask for updates on Kosuke Fukudomes strained hamstring, reactions to the Barry Bonds trial and opinions on instant replay.

Baseball culture doesnt allow Quade to dismiss it as a lower-body injury like Blackhawks coach Joel Quenneville. Quade has to account for essentially double the number of players and games as Bulls coach Tom Thibodeau. Quade cant help himself hell never be as boring as Lovie Smith at the Halas Hall podium.

Quade genuinely enjoys the give-and-take with reporters. He watches college basketball and wonders what the hell the coach is thinking, so he figures he cant be exempt from that second-guessing.

But there are limits. Picking a fight with Zambrano in the second week of the season probably isnt worth it. There will no doubt be other fires to put out.

In 17 years as a minor-league manager, and seven more as a big-league coach, Quade developed a thick skin. In this job, hes going to need it.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs visit White House as World Series champions

On the latest edition of the SportsTalk Live Podcast, David Kaplan is joined by David Haugh (Chicago Tribune) and Jason Goch (SB Nation Radio) to discuss the Cubs' visit to the White House.

The guys reflect on the historic day and Theo Epstein's speech. Then, the panel breaks down the Packers' impressive run and question whether it's okay for Bears fans to appreciate Aarond Rodgers and company.

Finally, are the Wild the Blackhawks' biggest threat come playoff time?

Listen to the SportsTalk Live podcast below.

 

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

Does Cubs president Theo Epstein have a future in politics?

WASHINGTON – President Barack Obama has a job for Theo Epstein whenever the Cubs executive gets bored or starts to feel restless and wants to think about life beyond baseball.  

After building up the Boston Red Sox and turning around the Cubs, how about Epstein using his leadership skills, analytical personality, sense of conviction and Ivy League education to save the Democratic Party?    

"His job is to quench droughts – 86 years in Boston, 108 in Chicago," Obama said during Monday's White House ceremony honoring the World Series champs. "He takes the reins of an organization that's wandering in the wilderness and delivers them to the promised land. I talked to him about being DNC chair."

Epstein stood behind the president doing a cut-it gesture and that became one of many laugh lines during an entertaining Obama speech that lasted more than 20 minutes and took place against the backdrop of Donald Trump's looming administration. Epstein – who headlined a Lincoln Park fundraiser during the 2012 reelection campaign and attended the president's farewell address last week at McCormick Place – doesn't see his future in politics.

At least "not as a candidate or an elected official," Epstein said during a media scrum afterward. "But I think there are a lot of ways that we can all impact our communities without necessarily running for office."

Epstein – a private person who would never want to subject his young family to that kind of scrutiny – looked like official Washington in a navy blue suit and a striped silver-and-blue tie. He delivered his own speech in the East Room, beginning it by saying "what a tough act to follow."

"We know you may have certain allegiances to another team on the other side of town," Epstein said to the world's most famous White Sox fan. "But we know you're a very proud Chicagoan. And we know your better, wiser half – the first lady – has been a lifelong and very loyal Cub fan, which we appreciate very much.

"Of course, we have great faith in your intelligence, your common sense, your pragmatism, your ability to recognize a good thing when you see one.

"So Mr. President, with only a few days remaining in your tremendous presidency, we have taken the liberty here today of offering you a midnight pardon.

"And so we welcome you with open arms."

This formal ceremony sounded personal for Epstein, who led the presentation giving Obama white and gray No. 44 jerseys, a 44 Wrigley Field scoreboard panel, a lifetime pass to the iconic stadium and an autographed W flag to someday fly at his presidential library on the South Side.  

"Everyone – no matter where you fall politically – can appreciate the dignity with which he served the country," Epstein said. "He did an unbelievable job handling the office and raising his family while here. I think, across the board, folks would agree that he's very dignified and brought a lot of integrity to the office. It was our pleasure to thank him for that today."

[RELATED: 'Among Sox fans, I'm the Cubs' No. 1 fan']

The DNC – or whatever Epstein does for his next act – will have to wait. Before that epic playoff run began, the Cubs locked up Epstein with a five-year deal believed to be worth in the neighborhood of $50 million, putting the future Hall of Fame executive in position to make another trip to the White House with a championship team.          

"Good thing I signed a contract with (chairman) Tom Ricketts," Epstein said. "He was kicking me, saying I can’t leave. It was a kind offer, though."