Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers

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Ricketts leaves Cubs waiting for answers

SAN DIEGO From the outside, it looks like the season slowly winds down in September. But when you wear a uniform for almost eight months, it comes to a complete, jarring stop.

The Cubs have tried to project the image of business as usual as they go through this transition period. But that illusion is just about over. The next general manager will decide their fates.

Chairman Tom Ricketts who addressed the team before Wednesdays game declined to comment on the search. He continues to gather information from contacts throughout the industry. He sounds ready to wait it out until he gets the answers he wants.

Well do it as efficiently and as quickly as possible, Ricketts said. But its a big decision. Theres no point in rushing it. We got to have the right guy at the right time. And however long it takes, it takes.

Ricketts met with manager Mike Quade shortly after he fired Jim Hendry, and again last week before the team left Chicago for the seasons final road trip. Quade is signed through next season, but his entire coaching staff isnt, leaving them all in limbo.

Its a big organizational decision, Quade said. Right now, its bigger than any of us, whether we like it or not. So you be patient or not (and) you say, I cant do this, Ive got to go look for work. But I think you have to keep things in perspective.

The courtesys been given to say, Look, its going to take awhile.

Ricketts recently locked up vice president of player personnel Oneri Fleita with a new four-year contract because the Detroit Tigers showed interest. There was a sense of urgency because Fleita is a point man for the new academy the Cubs are planning to build in the Dominican Republic.

Oneri is a really valuable part of this organization, Ricketts said. I think that any general manager coming in would agree with that. Its just a step we took to make sure that we have good continuity and (keep) building on the things we think were doing well.

Ricketts again said that Tim Wilken does a terrific job, though the scouting director did not get a similar extension. Wilkens signed through the 2012 season and has been given the authority to renew contracts within his department.

Quade and his coaches havent received any votes of confidence like that from ownership. Among the staff, there is a level of anxiety and an understanding that the next general manager will likely want his guys.

By nature, Quade is a stubborn optimist. He never played in the big leagues and still landed his dream job. Hes been fired before and has viewed his entire career to this point as a series of one-year contracts.

It hasnt been what we hoped for, Quade said. But Im not disappointed in the way I handled things and the way I went about my business. Good seasons, bad seasons, you go home and evaluate and youre always trying to get better.

I still feel pretty good about this job and doing what I do. If somebody else has a different thought (coming) in here, then theyll make that decision.

Several high-profile players including Carlos Pena, Aramis Ramirez and Ryan Dempster could be positioned to become free agents. If the search drags on, and the Cubs are forced to make some personnel decisions, Ricketts will get input from interim general manager Randy Bush. The chairman wont rule anything out.

With more than three million tickets again sold this year at Wrigley Field, Ricketts indicated that the overall budget for baseball operations will essentially remain the same next season. It would be up to the next general manager to determine how much is allocated for major-league payroll.

The Ricketts family has talked about owning this team for generations, but the chairman doesnt view 2012 as a bridge year or see this team being that far from contention. He pointed to the Arizona Diamondbacks who went from worst to first this season and the Cubs teams Hendry rebuilt on the fly.

One thing youve seen in baseball over the last few years is that turnarounds can happen pretty quickly, Ricketts said. I dont think its meaningful to describe a year as a rebuilding year or a reloading year or any of that.

You get the right players on the team and they all stay healthy and they play hard, the team can go from 70 wins to 90 wins. It happens pretty frequently. Things turn around fast. Thats the way we look at it for next year.
Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Now what? Jon Lester driven to deliver more World Series titles to Chicago

Now what? Jon Lester driven to deliver more World Series titles to Chicago

MESA, Ariz. — Now what? Ryan Dempster believes these Cubs are young enough, hungry enough and talented enough to become the first group to win back-to-back World Series since the three-peat New York Yankees built a dynasty with titles in 1996, 1998, 1999 and 2000.

But Dempster already understands the expectations at Wrigley Field this season, especially after pitching on disappointing Cubs teams that got swept out of the playoffs and working as a special assistant in Theo Epstein's front office.

"Nothing can top it," Dempster said. "You can win 162 games and sweep everybody in the playoffs and it won't be as exciting for people, other than maybe the guys playing it."

That's why Jon Lester isn't putting up the "Mission Accomplished" banner at his locker, even though the Cubs had the parade down Michigan Avenue in mind when they gave him the biggest contract in franchise history at the time. Dempster — who also earned a World Series ring with the 2013 Boston Red Sox — had given Lester a scouting report as the Cubs went all-out in their pursuit of the big-game lefty.

There are still four years left on Lester's $155 million megadeal. It has been less than five months since the Cubs finally won the World Series and unleashed an epic celebration.

"Now the hard part is you don't get complacent," Lester said Wednesday after throwing six innings against an Oakland A's minor-league squad at the Sloan Park complex. "I talk about these young guys — that's where that helps. Even though you've accomplished things personally, you still want these guys to accomplish things.

"That's where that drive still gets you. You don't want to let your teammates down. You still want to be accountable for what you do. And that means showing up and doing your work in between starts and in the offseason."

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Lester believed so much in Epstein's vision, the pipeline of talent about to burst and the lure of Chicago that he signed with a last-place team. The Cubs needed a symbol to show they were serious about winning, a clubhouse tone-setter and an anchor for their rotation.

A new comfort level in Year 2 of that contract helped explain how Lester performed as an All Star, a Cy Young Award finalist and the National League Championship Series co-MVP. But Lester wants to make sure that the Cubs don't get too comfortable — or feel like they're playing with house money.

"You enjoy that, you learn from it," Lester said. "The biggest thing is not getting complacent with yourself and with your teammates. That's what drives me, making sure I'm prepared to pitch.

"I'm called upon every five days, and I have to be there. That's where that goal of 30 starts and 200 innings comes into play. I feel like if I do that, then I've done my job, for my teammates and this organization.

"The championships and the World Series — that's stuff you can't predict. It's stuff you strive to do every single year. So that's all we're going to focus on again. Our team goal again is to win a World Series."

Cubs remember Dallas Green's impact on Wrigley Field

Cubs remember Dallas Green's impact on Wrigley Field

MESA, Ariz. — Dallas Green pictured what the Cubs have now become, striking gold in the draft, swinging big deals and pushing to modernize Wrigley Field. The Plan, The Foundation for Sustained Success, all those buzzwords had parallels to the 1980s franchise built in Green's image.

Green — a larger-than-life presence in some of baseball's most intense markets — died Wednesday at the age of 82 after a colorful career and a battle with kidney disease.

Green spent 46 years with the Philadelphia Phillies, guiding them to the 1980 World Series title and working at virtually every level of the organization. Green also pitched eight seasons in the big leagues and managed both the New York Mets and Yankees. But Green clearly raised expectations in Chicago, where he drew up the rough blueprint the Theo Epstein regime would follow 30 years later.

"Absolutely, there's no question," bench coach Dave Martinez said. "He had a vision. He was trying to build an organization from within."

Green took over baseball operations on the North Side and made a franchise-altering trade in 1982, using his Philadelphia connections to steal future Hall of Famer Ryne Sandberg and Larry Bowa for Ivan de Jesus.

Green's scouting department would draft Greg Maddux, Rafael Palmeiro, Mark Grace and Shawon Dunston. Trading for Rick Sutcliffe in the middle of the 1984 season led to the club's first playoff appearance since the 1945 World Series. Signing Andre Dawson to the blank-check contract helped fuel a 93-win season in 1989.

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Green had already been fired after repeated clashes with Tribune Co. bosses and a last-place finish in 1987. The force of Green's personality also helped the Cubs finally install lights at Wrigley Field in 1988.

"What a good baseball man," said Martinez, who got drafted by the Cubs in 1983 and lasted 16 seasons in the big leagues. "He could be hard, at times, but you respected that from him. He gave me and a bunch of other players I came up with the chance to play. And I can honestly say he really loved all of us kids. He thought at one point that we were going to be something special — if we would have stayed together.

"We thought we would be there together for a long time. It didn't work out that way, but he knew talent."

Even before this generation of Cubs executives traded for Jake Arrieta and Addison Russell — and drafted Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber — general manager Jed Hoyer understood the challenge Green undertook.

"When we first got to Chicago," Hoyer said, "you look back and think about what other times in the history of the Cubs did people try to do something similar to what we were doing. Really, him taking over in the 80s and building the '84 team is probably the most similar when you look at it. Some of those great trades that he made — those gutsy trades that he made — are pretty similar in a lot of ways.

"Were it not for a couple big breaks, they might have been able to end the curse a lot earlier."