Rothschild signs three-year deal with Yankees

282709.jpg

Rothschild signs three-year deal with Yankees

Friday, Nov. 19, 2010Updated 6:45 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Larry Rothschild started out with a Cubs team that had a veteran catcher in Joe Girardi and a young rotation filled with the promise of Kerry Wood and Mark Prior.

It seemed like Rothschild enjoyed the job security of a Supreme Court appointment. Since 2002, hes worked with Don Baylor, Dusty Baker and Lou Piniella as well as a few more interim managers and survived each change in the dugout.

Rothschild exercised his 2011 option last month before the Cubs reintroduced Mike Quade as their manager and appeared ready to return for his 10th season as pitching coach.

A long relationship ended quickly as the Yankees announced Friday that Rothschild has agreed to a three-year-deal and will join Girardis staff in New York.

Rothschild spent several hours on Tuesday watching video of three Yankee pitchers CC Sabathia, A.J. Burnett and Phil Hughes and formally interviewed for the job the next day.

By Friday afternoon, the 56-year-old pitching coach who doesnt go out of his way to talk to the media and get his name in print was on a teleconference explaining to some 50 reporters the lure of training near his home in Tampa, Fla., and spending more time with his wife and three children.

I didnt feel like it was time to leave the Cubs, Rothschild said. Its hard because Im very close with Mike Quade and have a lot of respect for him as a baseball person and I think hell do a great job for them. But it was time family-wise when this opportunity came along (and) the decision became relatively easy.

It has less to do with where the Cubs are than what I needed to do personally.

In recent years, Rothschild had informed Cubs general manager Jim Hendry that if possible he would like to explore options with a team that has a Florida presence. The Yankees facility is located a mile or two from Rothschilds house. Rothschild once managed the Tampa Bay Devil Rays for three-plus seasons.

Hendry expects to make a new hire shortly after the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Greg Maddux the future Hall of Famer and front-office assistant to Hendry is said to be reluctant to take on a full-time job in uniform right now because of similar family concerns.

Mark Riggins the Cubs minor-league pitching coordinator and one-time St. Louis Cardinals pitching coach is well-regarded for his work with the organizations young arms.

The Cubs led the National League with 96 quality starts last season. Whoever replaces Rothschild will have to connect with Carlos Zambrano, who may or may not have had a breakthrough near the end, finishing 8-0 with a 1.41 ERA in his final 11 starts.

Rothschild finally convinced Zambrano to worry more about location and movement instead of pure velocity. The Yankees have been intrigued by Zambrano, though he has a no-trade clause and is owed more than 35 million over the next two seasons.

Rothschilds first major project figures to be Burnett, who went 10-15 with a 5.26 ERA last season and isnt even halfway through a five-year, 82.5 million deal.

I think you grow to care about people, and when they know that, it becomes a better working relationship, Rothschild said. If you have kids, its not always smooth sailing. (Sometimes) you do different things to try to get them where you need to get them.

It will be easier if the Yankees sign free agent Cliff Lee to a nine-figure contract and add another Cy Young Award winner to the staff. Rothschild who grew up in Chicagos suburbs and graduated from Homewood-Flossmoor High School said his father is a big Yankees fan. They used to go watch the team at Comiskey Park. Its hard to turn down those pinstripes.

Its unique, Rothschild said, because it is the Yankees and everyone knows what that means.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer

Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — The Cubs are reportedly moving closer toward acquiring Wade Davis — an All-Star closer who’s already notched the final out of the World Series — in a deal with the Kansas City Royals that would involve outfielder Jorge Soler.

The Cubs are making pitching their top priority this week at the winter meetings as they build out the team that will defend the franchise’s first World Series title in 108 years. If healthy, Davis would provide exactly the kind of late-game force the Cubs were looking for when they checked into the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center outside Washington, D.C.

At a time when Aroldis Chapman and Kenley Jansen are looking to smash the record contract the San Francisco Giants just gave Mark Melancon (four years, $62 million), the Cubs could stay flexible for the future and mitigate risk with Davis, who will make $10 million in 2017 and can become a free agent after that season.

“We’re still talking about a lot of things,” manager Joe Maddon said before the Davis reports surfaced late Tuesday night. “We’re always looking to augment bullpens. Bullpens are so different on an annual basis. And I think every organization — especially after this (postseason) — is looking to reinvent their bullpens in different ways.”

The Royals had been at the forefront of that movement, using Davis as part of a deep, powerful bullpen that helped them shorten games and win back-to-back American League pennants and the 2015 World Series.

Maddon’s Tampa Bay Rays teams originally groomed Davis as a starter before flipping him to the Royals as part of the blockbuster James Shields/Wil Myers deal in December 2012.

[SHOP CUBS: Get your Cubs gear right here]

Davis blossomed in Kansas City, putting up ridiculous numbers as a setup guy/closer. He allowed zero homers in 2014 (1.00 ERA) and 2016 (1.87 ERA) and gave up only three in 2015 (0.94 ERA). During that time, he piled up 234 strikeouts against 59 walks in 182 2/3 innings. He has a 0.84 ERA in 32 1/3 career postseason innings.

Davis, 31, dealt with a strained right forearm this year, but injuries have been a recurring issue for Soler, who would be getting squeezed for playing time even when healthy at Wrigley Field.

The Cuban outfielder has shown flashes of his enormous potential since signing a $30 million contract in the summer of 2012. But Soler (.762 career OPS) looks more like a designated hitter who might benefit from a change of scenery to help unlock some of those physical gifts.

Soler still hasn’t turned 25 yet — or come close to playing a full season in the big leagues — but this is why the Cubs stockpiled so many hitters and prepared to make trades for pitching.

Hector Rondon and Pedro Strop almost disappeared during the playoffs, though the Cubs think that can be largely written off as late-season injuries and issues of timing and sharpness. The Cubs believe in Carl Edwards Jr. but still had to carefully manage his innings and appearances during his rookie season.

This wouldn’t necessarily stop with Davis, either. The Cubs plan to give Maddon some shiny new toys in the bullpen.

The second-guessing follows Joe Maddon from World Series to winter meetings

The second-guessing follows Joe Maddon from World Series to winter meetings

NATIONAL HARBOR, Md. — At least 10 cameras lined up in a cramped corner of a huge hotel ballroom to capture Joe Maddon’s media session late Tuesday afternoon. For almost six minutes, reporters fired off Game 7 questions as the Cubs manager explained his thinking during the World Series.

And then a beat writer abruptly switched topics and asked who would hit leadoff once Dexter Fowler is gone.

“I don’t know, that’s a really good question,” Maddon said. “We’ve talked. There are some brilliant people standing around me right now.”

For a moment, Maddon sounded a little annoyed and defensive during Day 2 of the winter meetings. But the guy who designed “The Process is Fearless” T-shirts will point to the results from that instant classic against the Cleveland Indians.

“It’s fascinating to me regarding the second-guessing, because the only reality I know is that we won,” Maddon said at the Gaylord National Resort & Convention Center outside Washington, D.C.

“We have oftentimes in the past talked about ‘outcome bias.’ Or if people would anticipate, had you done something differently, would it have turned out better?

“But better than winning — I don’t know what that is.”

[SHOP CUBS: Get your Cubs gear right here]

There won’t be enough space on Maddon’s Hall of Fame plaque to bullet-point all the twists and turns during those 10 innings in Cleveland, how he pulled Cy Young Award finalist Kyle Hendricks in the fifth and brought $155 million reliever Jon Lester into the game with a runner on base, a situation the Cubs wanted to avoid, in case that triggered the yips.

Maddon wrote off Aroldis Chapman giving up a game-tying, two-run homer to Rajai Davis in the eighth inning as a matter of location — not velocity — even though the closer wound up throwing 97 pitches in Games 5, 6 and 7 combined.

If anything, Maddon might have to do more of the convincing within his own clubhouse. Jason Heyward watched from third base as the manager ordered Javier Baez to bunt on a 3-2 count in the ninth inning and felt compelled to call a players-only meeting inside a Progressive Field weight room during the 17-minute rain delay.

“You can’t control the narrative when the game is in progress,” Maddon said. “I’ve talked about the barroom banter. And I definitely know that I was able to fill up — based on my decision-making in that game — a lot of barroom banter throughout the Chicago area, or nationally, internationally.

“But the point is, when you work a game like that, there’s not an eighth game. There’s only a seventh game. Everything that you saw us do that night, I planned out before the game ever began and felt really strongly about it — and still do.

“Just take away one hit by Davis, it worked out pretty darn well. But then you have to give our guys credit for the way we withstood the onslaught and eventually won the game.”

Ultimately, an 8-7 victory ended the 108-year drought, meaning Maddon should someday have his own spot in Cooperstown.

Instead of taking a public victory lap — the way his players have celebrated on “Saturday Night Live” and the talk-show circuit — Maddon went into decompression mode. Maddon bought a Dodge Challenger Hellcat muscle car, saw “Hamilton” on Broadway and partied at the Zeta Psi fraternity house for the Lafayette-Lehigh football game at his old stomping grounds in Pennsylvania.

Without Maddon, the Cubs don’t win 97 games and two playoff rounds last year, which opened the floodgates for nearly $290 million to spend on free agents. But after “Embrace The Target,” Maddon will have to come up with a new message for the 2017 Cubs, a group that might find some of his tactics a little old.

“You still want to ‘Try Not To Suck,’ but you can’t wear that out,” Maddon said. “I really feel confident. I like our group a lot. If you look at our core group and what we did last year — the youth, the inexperience turning into experience, the authenticity of our players — I want to believe (in) the humility of our players.

“All those things (are) what I’m going to rely on. That’s going to permit us — beyond our skill abilities — (to) be good for a period of time.”