Russell to make first MLB start as Cubs face Astros

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Russell to make first MLB start as Cubs face Astros

Tuesday, April 12, 2011
Posted: 9:27 a.m.

(AP) -- Despite two impressive outings, Houston Astros right-hander Brett Myers has yet to record a win due largely to a lack of run support.

The way he's pitched against the Chicago Cubs, he may not need much offensive help from his teammates.

Myers looks to continue his mastery of the visiting Cubs on Tuesday night when the teams continue a three-game series.

After allowing three hits and two runs - one earned - over seven innings of a 5-4 season-opening loss at Philadelphia on April 1, Myers (0-0, 2.03 ERA) limited Cincinnati to six hits and two runs in 6 1-3 innings during Thursday's 3-2 win - Houston's first of the season.

READ: Green light? Quade sends Cubs strong signals

"How good was Myers again?," manager Brad Mills told the Astros' official website. "You've got to love the way he battled all the way through."

Myers is 8-0 with a 2.12 ERA in his last nine starts against the Cubs (5-5), and limited them to one run over seven innings July 21, 2010, in the only appearance during that span where he failed to record a decision.

He went 3-0 with a 1.21 ERA in four starts versus Chicago last season, striking out 34 in 29 2-3 innings.

The NL-worst Astros (2-8) fell behind early in Monday's series opener and ultimately suffered their third loss in four games at Minute Maid Park, 5-4.

Houston increased its home batting average to .324 with 10 hits, but went 3 for 12 with runners in scoring position.

"I blame the loss on me," said infielder Joe Inglett, who left three men on base, two in the ninth. "I had the opportunity and didn't come through. Can't dwell on it. There was more opportunity for me to do something, to drive runs in, but it didn't happen."

Cubs relievers, meanwhile, stepped up to throw 2 2-3 scoreless innings after compiling a 5.14 ERA over the previous five games.

Chicago's bullpen could be in line for a heavy workload Tuesday with James Russell (1-0, 0.00) scheduled to make his first major league start.

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The left-hander, who has pitched two scoreless innings in relief this season, is not expected to make more than 50 pitches as he takes injured Andrew Cashner's turn in the rotation.

"I'm very, very excited about it," Russell told the Cubs' official website.

With outfielder Kosuke Fukudome out with a hamstring injury, shortstop Starlin Castro batted leadoff Monday and went 3 for 5 to increase his average to .364.

"I don't care what spot," Castro said. "First, second, I don't care."

Darwin Barney also continued his hot hitting, collecting two hits for the second consecutive game. He also scored twice and drove in a run.

"The kids did really, really well," manager Mike Quade said of Castro and Barney. "I liked watching them. It's fun to watch them. They feed off of each other, and they play with enthusiasm."

Carlos Pena, though, went 0 for 2 with two walks Monday and saw his average dip to .174.

Castro is 2 for 12 lifetime against Myers while teammates Aramis Ramirez and Alfonso Soriano are a combined 14 for 67 (.209) with 24 strikeouts. Pena is 0 for 5 against Myers.

The Cubs have won three of four on the road against Houston.

Copyright 2011 Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.

The Chris Sale trade had a major impact on the 2017 World Series odds

The Chris Sale trade had a major impact on the 2017 World Series odds

When the White Sox traded Chris Sale to the Red Sox Tuesday, it shook up the balance of power around Major League Baseball.

Wednesday morning, that power shift was present in Bovada's 2017 World Series odds.

On Nov. 3 (the day after the World Series ended), the Cubs were the frontrunners for the 2017 World Series at 7/2 odds. The Boston Red Sox were right behind at 9/1.

After acquiring Sale, the Red Sox have now bumped up to 11/2 odds to win it all while the Cubs have gone down slightly to 15/4.

[Complete coverage of the White Sox-Red Sox Chris Sale blockbuster trade]

Here is the complete list of the Top 5 odds, as of Wednesday morning:

1. Cubs - 15/4
2. Red Sox - 11/2
3. Nationals - 9/1
4. Indians - 12/1
5. Astros - 12/1

The Cubs' odds may also see a boost if/when the Wade Davis trade becomes official.

On the other hand, the White Sox odds fell from 40/1 the day after the 2016 World Series to 66/1 Wednesday morning after dealing away Sale.

Of course, Sale is only one player, but it's more so the Sox trading him away is a clear indication they are not "going for it" in 2017 for the major decrease. If the Sox continue to sell, look for those odds to fall even further.

As of Wednesday morning, the Colorado Rockies (before they signed Ian Desmond to a five-year deal), Arizona Diamondbacks, Cincinnati Reds and San Diego Padres were the only teams with lower odds to win a championship in 2017 than the White Sox.

Cubs officially trade Jorge Soler to Royals for Wade Davis

Cubs officially trade Jorge Soler to Royals for Wade Davis

It appears as if the Cubs have answered two big questions surrounding Joe Maddon's team this winter.

With so many solid options in the fold to play everyday in the lineup, the Cubs now reportedly have one less guy to worry about in the outfield and one more pitcher to add into the late-inning mix.

USAToday's Bob Nightengale reported late Tuesday night the Cubs and Kansas City Royals had a deal in place with pitcher Wade Davis coming to Chicago and Jorge Soler acting as the return piece, though the deal did not become official until Wednesday afternoon:

[RELATED - Wade Davis trade would give Cubs a proven October closer]

As Nightengale also said, the Cubs gave up a lot for Davis, who will become a free agent after the 2017 season and was limited to only 43.1 innings in 2016 due to forearm issues:

Soler has struggled to stay healthy and cash in on his enormous potential during his two-plus years in the big leagues with the Cubs, but he is still young (he'll turn 25 in February) and won't become a free agent until after the 2020 season.

The main question with Soler entering 2017 was going to be where he would play — and how often — given Kyle Schwarber, Jason Heyward, Jon Jay and Albert Almora were already in the outfield mix and the anticipation Ben Zobrist would also see some time in the outfield with Javy Baez locking down second base.

It's no surprise to see Soler dealt this winter, but as David Kaplan said on Tuesday's CubsTalk podcast, Theo Epstein's front office is all about years of control, but if the deal goes through, they will have traded four years of control of a guy who was their top trade chip for only a year of control on a relief pitcher who has averaged only 61 innings per season the last three years.

However, if the 31-year-old Davis is truly the only return, he helps give the Cubs a boost in 2017.

[SHOP CUBS: Get your Cubs gear right here]

Davis — who spent the first four years of his big-league career pitching for Maddon in Tampa Bay — has emerged as one of the premier relief pitchers in baseball over the last three years.

In that span, Davis tallied a 19-4 record with 47 saves in 54 chances, a 1.18 ERA and sparkling 0.892 WHIP. He also struck out 234 batters in 182.2 innings while giving up just three homers. 

As the Cubs look to defend their first World Series title in more than a century, Davis would help shore up the bullpen and given his past experience, would figure to be able to pitch more than just the ninth inning come playoff time (if healthy). Davis would add another elite option alongside Hector Rondon, Pedro Strop and Carl Edwards Jr. in Maddon's remodeled bullpen.

Soler should benefit from a clear path to consistent playing time with the Royals, especially moving to the American League where he can slot in at designated hitter which may ultimately be his best position.