Chicago Cubs

Schierholtz ready to make his mark with Cubs

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Schierholtz ready to make his mark with Cubs

With spring training just a couple weeks away, the parallels between Brett Jackson and Nate Schierholtz extend beyond just the fact they will man the same outfield in Arizona.

As the two were heading from California to Chicago for the 2013 Cubs Convention last week, they found themselves in the same row on the same flight.

That's not altogether surprising, considering they both hail from the same area on the nation's left coast. Schierholtz attended high school at San Ramon Valley in Danville, Calif., while Jackson grew up in Berkeley and attended the Berkeley campus of the University of California.

RELATED: As Cubs eye outfield options, Brett Jackson expects a breakthrough

According to Schierholtz, the two had the same coaches growing up.

"It's kind of a cool similarity," Schierholtz said at the Sheraton Chicago Hotel & Towers Friday. "I'm looking forward to giving him tips and helping him out any way I can. I'm looking forward to being his teammate."

The Cubs brought in Schierholtz this winter to help provide outfield depth on the big-league club, allowing Jackson to head back to Triple-A Iowa to start the 2013 season after striking out in almost half his at-bats in the majors at the end of last year.

Schierholtz turned down offers from several other teams to ink a one-year, 2.25 million deal -- with 500,000 in incentives -- with the Cubs.

There are still a few weeks left in the offseason and the Cubs continue to court local product Scott Harison to help bolster the outfield, Schierholtz was given the impression before he signed that he would receive regular playing time in Chicago.

"Cubs manager Dale Sveum said he was looking for me to come in and play the outfield every day," Schierholtz said. "That's something I've looked forward to my whole career. I got chances here and there in San Francisco, but I didn't really get a full-time job ever. It's my job to come in to spring training and show them what I can do.

"The opportunity here was a no-brainer to me. I wasn't looking to be a fourth outfielder. I wanted a chance to play every day. I felt like this team is going in the right direction and I thought I could help them out."

While some other clubs were offering multi-year deals or the chance to contend in '13, they couldn't provide the regular playing time the Cubs had to offer.

MORE: Cubs' Baker sets his sights on showcasing his recovery

"What it came down to is I just felt comfortable here," Schierholtz said. "I talked to Dale a couple times before I signed and I talked to a lot of other teams as well. It just came down to Chicago really believing in me and believing I can come in and play up to my potential.

"It wasn't as important to me to sign somewhere for, say, two years and potentially not play as much as opposed to coming here and playing. Everything just felt right. I love the city and the fans. I couldn't be happier to be here."

As for when Jackson arrives, Schierholtz has plenty to offer the young prospect.

Schierholtz -- who, like Jackson, hits lefty and throws right-handed and is considered an above-average defender -- is only four years older than Jackson, but knows what it's like to handle expectations.

The 28-year-old outfielder was a second round draft pick of the Giants in 2003, six years before the Cubs took Jackson 31st overall.

Both players are roughly the same size -- Jackson is listed at 6-foot-2, 210 pounds while Scherholtz is listed at 6-foot-1, 205 pounds -- and ironically have the exact same career OPS in the minors (.867).

But while Jackson got his first taste of big-league action last season, Schierholtz has been here before and brings playoff experience to the Cubs outfield.

Schierholtz earned a World Series ring for his work on the 2010 Giants and spent the beginning of last year in San Francisco before being traded to the Phillies for Hunter Pence and watching his former team claim their second championship in three seasons.

MORE: Edwin Jackson aiming to bring winning tradition to Cubs

"I was fortunate enough to play for a couple teams that went to the World Series and won," he said. "So I want to get back there. I feel like once you've done it, you really want to get back and you have a little bit different perspective. I'll do everything I can to help the team out and hopefully we can start winning some games.

"Playoff experience has helped me a lot. It helped me just settle in and finally realize the importance of team chemistry.

"winning is more fun, that's really what it comes down to. When you win games, everyone's happy. That's the ultimate goal."

Breaking down how Cubs look at the Justin Verlander situation

Breaking down how Cubs look at the Justin Verlander situation

Theo Epstein’s embrace-debate management style means the Cubs are constantly running through different scenarios, trying to balance their win-now urges against what should be a very bright future in Wrigleyville.

The financials, the human intelligence and the analytics are all factored into the equation, which leads to this question for Epstein’s cabinet: Is there a point where the Detroit Tigers kick in enough money and the prospect cost becomes so low that Justin Verlander makes sense for the Cubs?

The Cubs haven’t definitively answered that question yet or completely ruled out the idea, a team source said Tuesday, cautioning that the defending World Series champs are still more likely to add a reliever before the July 31 trade deadline than acquire a frontline starting pitcher.

“Always looking to make the team better,” manager Joe Maddon said before a 7-2 win over the White Sox kept the Cubs in a virtual first-place tie with the Milwaukee Brewers. “Always. That’s what a GM and a president does. But I like our guys.”  

Verlander would obviously benefit from a move to the National League and feel energized in a pennant race. The Cubs could rationalize this as an immediate boost and a long-range solution while preparing for a 2018 rotation without Jake Arrieta and John Lackey.

Imagine the buzz from Kate Upton’s fiancée walking into the clubhouse and making his first start at Wrigley Field in a Cubs uniform. Verlander and Upton have been spotted enough times at Chicago Cut Steakhouse that his no-trade power might be the easiest hurdle to clear in a deal of this magnitude.

Verlander’s overall numbers are ordinary this season (5-7, 4.50 ERA, 1.444 WHIP), but trending in the right direction. The Cubs would go into it knowing that they wouldn’t get the same guy who won 24 games and American League MVP and Cy Young awards in 2011.

The Tigers also can’t just give away a franchise icon who finished second in last year’s AL Cy Young voting and has a 3.39 ERA in 16 career playoff starts

The Cubs are trying to see around corners and anticipate what the team will look like in 2018 and 2019 – when Verlander will make $28 million guaranteed each season – and what might be available in trades and on the free-agent market during those transaction cycles. Verlander is also owed the balance of his $28 million salary this season and has a $22 million vesting option for 2020.

Even if the Tigers pay down some of that commitment, that’s still a ton of exposure with a guy who has roughly 2,500 innings on his odometer and will be 35 years old around the time pitchers and catchers report to spring training next season. That’s also when the Cubs will begin the second half of Jon Lester’s $155 million megadeal – for his age-34, -35 and -36 seasons.

After stunning the baseball world with that blockbuster White Sox trade during the All-Star break, Epstein talked about how Jose Quintana’s reasonable contract – $8.85 million next season plus team options for 2019 and 2020 worth $22 million combined – creates room for another star player.

As great as Verlander has been throughout his career, are the Cubs really ready to pour that money back into a player who was born in 1983? And meet Detroit’s asking price in terms of prospects?

And go against the buy-low philosophy that attracted the Cubs to Arrieta, as well as the ageism that makes them reluctant to reinvest in their own Cy Young Award winner? And potentially close off opportunities to sign free agents from the monster class coming after the 2018 season?

Probably not, but the Cubs haven’t shut down the Verlander discussion yet.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs even up Crosstown Series with White Sox

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs even up Crosstown Series with White Sox

Danny Parkins (670 The Score), Jordan Bernfield (ESPN) and Mark Potash (Chicago Sun-Times) join Kap to talk Game 2 of the Crosstown Series.

Later, the group previews Bears camp and what's going on with the Cavaliers.

Check out the SportsTalk Live Podcast below: