Slow down: Cubs, Ramirez want green light to run

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Slow down: Cubs, Ramirez want green light to run

Sunday, March 6, 2011
3:14 p.m.
By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com
MESA, Ariz. Aramis Ramirez carried a sandwich and a Mountain Dew back to his locker on Sunday and saw five reporters approaching.

I thought I got traded or something, he joked.

They were curious about another idea that seems just as unlikely Ramirez telling manager Mike Quade that he wants the green light to run. Ramirez, who made his major-league debut in 1998, has 15 stolen bases in his career. He thinks he could get as many as 10 this year.

Hey, if you can sneak one here and there theyre not paying attention to me. I know that for a fact, Ramirez said. I dont think you have to be a fast runner to steal bases. I dont think (Albert) Pujols is fast. He steals 15 to 20 bags.

The Cubs do not have a prototypical leadoff hitter. The middle of their order Marlon Byrd, Ramirez, Carlos Pena and Alfonso Soriano will be at ages 34, 33, 33 and 35 by seasons end. Their lineup is built around power, not speed.

But as Byrd pointed out, new first-base coach Bob Dernier is pushing the Cubs to be more aggressive. Dernier stole 218 bases in his career and previously worked as the organizations minor-league base-running coordinator.

Oh yeah, we can run, Byrd said. Im sure 'Q' is going to let us run a little bit with all our athleticism that we do have on the team. We didnt show it last year. Now its time to pick it up.

The message from Quade on Sunday was slow down. Ryan Theriot, who was shipped out at last seasons trade deadline, led the team with 16 stolen bases in 2010. Overall the Cubs stole 55, which tied them for last in the majors.

I know Bobby is very interested in making sure that this label that we dont run gets eliminated, Quade said, but we need to run intelligently. (We) dont have a bunch of flyers on this club, but we want to take advantage when the situation presents itself. Were not selling out to quote-unquote run.

I always used to laugh (when guys say): I want to be aggressive and I want to run. I look at his roster and (they) got a bunch of heavy-legged home run hitters. Youre going to run yourself out of innings.

That sounds like a more accurate description of your 2011 Cubs. But Byrd, Kosuke Fukudome, Tyler Colvin and Fernando Perez if he makes the team as the fifth outfielder should pressure teams.

Ultimately, its not a question of running or not running. Its being smarter, more decisive and aware of your surroundings.

If you get a good jump, Ramirez said, you can steal some bases.

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Where it all went wrong for Cubs and Miguel Montero

Where it all went wrong for Cubs and Miguel Montero

WASHINGTON – The Cubs swiftly reacted to Miguel Montero’s jaw-dropping criticism of Jake Arrieta, dumping the veteran catcher the day after the Washington Nationals ran wild with seven stolen bases and exposed some of the issues within the visiting clubhouse.

You could read the writing on the wall Wednesday morning when Anthony Rizzo’s comments on his weekly WMVP-AM 1000 appearance went viral. An All-Star first baseman who is tight with management and picky about when he decides to speak up called out Montero as a “selfish player.”

In designating Montero for assignment – a source confirmed catcher Victor Caratini will also be promoted from Triple-A Iowa – the Cubs will have to eat roughly half of his $14 million salary in the final year of his contract. 

Montero’s biggest sin is that he no longer produces like the two-time All-Star he had been with the Arizona Diamondbacks, where he developed a reputation for blunt honesty and a willingness to mentor young players. The Cubs wanted that edge when they traded for Montero at the 2014 winter meetings, part of a dramatic makeover that included signing ace pitcher Jon Lester to a $155 million megadeal.

Montero’s goofy “#WeAreGood” hashtag on Twitter became a symbol for a rising franchise and a loose team that didn’t care about the weight of history. 

But where Montero could be the spokesman in Arizona and wear the target on his back, a backup catcher can’t torch a Cy Young Award winner and the team’s running-game strategy when he is 0-for-31 and Contreras is throwing guys out 34 percent of the time.     

Montero welcomed Contreras and Kyle Schwarber to the big leagues, generously trying to help with their learning curve, even as they kept taking his playing time. Montero didn’t exactly have the same reaction to David Ross becoming a media darling and a crossover celebrity.

[RELATED: Miguel Montero sends classy goodbye to Cubs players and fans]

Montero already put himself in jeopardy in the immediate World Series aftermath, ripping manager Joe Maddon in a radio interview on the same day as the championship parade and Grant Park rally.  

Montero couldn’t help himself, even after delivering a pinch-hit grand slam against the Los Angeles Dodgers in Game 1 of the National League Championship Series, and driving in what turned out to be the winning run in the 10th inning against the Cleveland Indians in a World Series Game 7.

Montero wouldn’t bite his tongue late Tuesday night after a sloppy, frustrating 6-1 loss at Nationals Park. With a 39-38 record, several key players on the disabled list and a clubhouse far more complex than Maddon’s Woodstock visions, the Cubs are in crisis mode.   

“It really sucks because the stolen bases go on me,” Montero said. “When you really look at it, the pitcher doesn’t give me any time. It’s just like: ‘Yeah, OK, Miggy can’t throw nobody out.’ Yeah, but my pitchers don’t hold anybody on. It’s tough, because it doesn’t matter how much work I put in.

“If I don’t get a chance to throw, that’s the reason why they were running left and right today, because they know he was slow to the plate. Simple as that. It’s a shame that it’s my fault because I didn’t throw anybody out.”

Miguel Montero sends a classy goodbye to Cubs players and fans

Miguel Montero sends a classy goodbye to Cubs players and fans

Miguel Montero's Tuesday night comments showed questionable judgement, but the veteran catcher was all class in a farewell statement.

Montero said goodbye to his Cubs teammates, staff members and the city of Chicago Wednesday in a series of Tweets:

It's a perfect way for Montero to sign off, using the hashtag that united fans in 2015 as the Cubs' championship window first opened.

Montero has been an integral part of the Cubs the last three years, hitting maybe the biggest home run in franchise history (the grand slam in Game 1 of the NLCS against the Los Angeles Dodgers) and helping mentor Willson Contreras.