Chicago Cubs

Soriano wants to lead the way for Cubs

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Soriano wants to lead the way for Cubs

MESA, Ariz. You can ask Alfonso Soriano just about anything and hell say whatevers on his mind.

When the clubhouse opened on Friday, the media staked out the corner by his locker, shoulder to shoulder, oblivious to the two players stretching out on the floor, forcing them to get up and move.

On a Cubs team without many big names, and with so many new faces, there is still Soriano.

Soriano was at ease standing there in front of the waves of reporters, resting his arm against a locker. He insisted that Starlin Castro did nothing wrong. He said he was happy for Ryan Braun, glad the Milwaukee Brewers star overturned a 50-game suspension for a positive drug test.

Carlos Zambrano? Soriano says: Nobody was happy. I think the team was happy they were able to trade him. I think Zs happy, too, now that hes in Miami, so it worked great for both (sides).

Zambrano is hanging with Ozzie Guillen, while Aramis Ramirez will protect Braun in the Brewers lineup. The sweeping changes at Clark and Addison didnt touch Soriano.

The past couple years we had a nice group, but some people (werent) giving 100 percent, Soriano said. Now this group is kind of young. Theyre hungry to play and were ready to compete.

The Cubs were coming off a last-place finish in 2006 when Soriano signed his 136 million contract. Hes a symbol of the old way of doing business, the win-one-for-the-Tribune mentality that overtook the organization.

Theo Epstein is supposed to build it the right way, for the long haul. A 36-year-old outfielder with creaky legs, no-trade rights and 54 million guaranteed through 2014 doesnt exactly fit the vision. But the new president of baseball operations expects Soriano to be a leader.

People respect me because of the way that I work Im not a lazy guy, Soriano said. Im the oldest guy (among the position players). People see me work. People see my attitude, so I think thats a leader.

Soriano believes he will get along fine with new manager Dale Sveum, whos promised to hold players accountable and call out anyone who doesnt hustle.

Its not a problem, Soriano said. We can play hard for him. I think if we play harder every day, well see a difference and I want to try to do my best to make him happy.

The bigger tension might be between the urge to win now and the patience it will take to build an annual contender. Its something Sveum mentioned in his first meeting with the whole team.

The biggest question (all) winter was rebuilding, (that) things are starting over, Sveum said. I just let them know (this is) a team that can compete Were not here to rebuild. Were here to try and win the World Series this year.

Chairman Tom Ricketts even corrected one reporter who used the word patience.

No, were not preaching patience, Ricketts said. Were preaching have expectations. Expect these guys to play hard. Expect them to compete every game. Expect them to have a great season. Its not about patience. We got a good team and were going to have a good year.

As much as the Cubs wanted someone to take on even a fraction of Sorianos contract, they need him now to generate 25 homers, 90 RBIs and anchor the middle of the lineup.

Theyve said nothing about a trade, Soriano said. Im here. I dont want to think about if I want to get traded in the future or tomorrow, whatever. I just got to concentrate and play baseball.

All these years later, and after a winter in which he was booed at the Cubs Convention and all over the trade rumors, Soriano has shown up for another rebuilding project.

I love this organization, he said. I signed here to try to make this team better and win. I think weve got a chance to win and thats my goal. I just want to stay here to see this team win one championship.

Mike Montgomery will gladly aid Cubs as spot starter, but could this be a mini audition for 2018 rotation?

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USA TODAY

Mike Montgomery will gladly aid Cubs as spot starter, but could this be a mini audition for 2018 rotation?

Jon Lester isn’t expected to be on the disabled list for long, which of course is great news for the Cubs.

But while he’s there, it’s once again time for Mike Montgomery to audition for a spot in the team’s 2018 starting rotation.

The Cubs are facing the possibility of losing two members of that starting staff this offseason, when both Jake Arrieta and John Lackey will be free agents. Montgomery seems like a logical replacement, but he’ll need to be better than he’s been as a starter this season. He’s put up a 5.13 ERA in eight starts.

He’ll get another opportunity to show his stuff over the next week or so, as he makes one or two spot starts with Lester on the shelf resting up his left lat tightness and general shoulder fatigue.

“I don’t want to see anybody get hurt, especially our ace. But it’s a challenge. I’m looking forward to going out there and helping the team win,” Montgomery said over the weekend. “I’m going to go out there and prepare and be ready to help this team get to the playoffs.”

Montgomery doesn’t have to worry about instilling confidence in his bosses. Joe Maddon and Theo Epstein both lauded Montgomery’s efforts since he was acquired about a year ago, in the middle of the 2016 team’s march to that curse-smashing World Series win. It was Montgomery who earned the save in Game 7.

And again this season Montgomery has given plenty of reason for those guys to have confidence in him. He’s turned in a strong 2.57 ERA in 27 relief appearances, one of the more reliable arms out of what is becoming an increasingly shaky bullpen. This past Thursday, he relieved the early-to-depart Lester, pitching 4.1 shutout innings and allowing just three hits and a walk against the Cincinnati Reds.

Throw in the versatility of being able to effectively switch between starting and relieving, and that’s a recipe for sticking on a big league roster.

“He’s good about bouncing back and forth,” Maddon said. “He’s been invaluable to us the last couple years. He’s still learning his craft. Every time I talk to him it’s kind of like the little lightbulb constantly goes off for him regarding his stuff and how to utilize it. That’s what I’ve been talking about with him the last couple years. This guy’s got all kinds of tools in the toolbox but he doesn’t really know how to utilize them all, and I think he’s finally understanding the cutter, the curve, the changeup to go with the fastball. He’s one of those guys that he should never get wild with his fastball because his pitches are so good and he can throw them for a strike.”

Montgomery’s reliability has been enough that Epstein said there’s no plan for the Cubs to add another starting pitcher before this month’s waiver trade deadline. Of course, the fact that Lester’s injury isn’t as bad as initially feared and the July acquisition of Jose Quintana factors into that, as well.

“We’ve expended a lot of prospect capital trying to make this team better. We think it’s just a start or two (that Lester will miss), and Mike Montgomery is more than capable of filling in,” Epstein said. “He’s thrown the ball really well, like what we saw from him (Thursday). So we’re going to fill that vacancy internally with Mike and go from there.”

While every start made by any pitcher this season seems important — the Cubs entered Monday’s day off with just a two-game lead on the Milwaukee Brewers in the National League Central standings, with a playoff spot hardly guaranteed — Montgomery’s efforts could have just as great an effect on next season. If Arrieta and Lackey both end up departing via free agency, the Cubs will need some replacements. Montgomery figures to be among the first options, especially if this midseason audition goes well.

Of course, Montgomery is happy to do whatever he needs to to help his team. He’s not complaining about a bullpen role or one that has him shuttling between the relief corps and the rotation. But he admitted that starting is his goal, meaning the importance of this moment likely hasn't been lost on him.

“Yeah, absolutely, I wanted to start. But also I wanted to be a guy who could fill another role and hopes that makes our team better,” he said. “If me starting makes us better in their mind, then that’s what I want ideally. But I’ve realized I can’t always control that, I can go out there and pitch well. If I pitch well, they’re probably going to give me more opportunities, which is probably going to lead to starting.

“I think it’s because I spent five years in Triple-A from the time I was 21 and I had a bigger ego. And then you realize that you just want to be in the big leagues and that Triple-A kind of stinks. I think it’s just how I’ve gotten to this point. And coming here last year from a team that was trying to get in the playoffs to a team that was clearly going to win the division, you realize that your role isn’t to come here and start making demands, it’s to come here and just do your job.”

Right now, the Cubs need Montgomery to fill the void while Lester rests up. And if he can make his starts look a little more like his bullpen outings, he’ll do just that. And if that’s what happens, maybe they’ll call on him next season to do a whole lot more.

That Anthony Rizzo is so hot right now: Cubs' first baseman named NL Player of the Week

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USA TODAY

That Anthony Rizzo is so hot right now: Cubs' first baseman named NL Player of the Week

That Anthony Rizzo is so hot right now.

And Major League Baseball noticed.

Rizzo was announced as the National League Player of the Week on Monday after a terrific performance last week.

The Cubs' first baseman collected 12 hits, drove in 13 runs and slashed a ridiculous .429/.484/.750.

The Cubs had a pretty good week as a team, too, winning five of their seven games against the visiting Cincinnati Reds and Toronto Blue Jays.

They take their three-game winning streak to Ohio to start a three-game set with the Reds on Tuesday.