Theo Epstein is the man of the moment

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Theo Epstein is the man of the moment

READ: Cubs won't give up top players for Epstein
READ: Is Epstein ready for Chicago?
READ: Red Sox can't keep Epstein around forever
Buckley: Epstein not tied to Boston
WATCH: Epstein talk on CTL

A person who works for Tom Ricketts observed that the Cubs chairman would make a good scout. This was said with a certain amount of admiration as Ricketts conducts his clandestine search for a new general manager.

Ricketts would rather not be seen or heard until the new hire is introduced at a stadium club news conference. He believes his family will own the team for generations. He knows this decision will shape the franchise for years, if not decades, to come.

So thats why Cubs employees have been told to be patient, why theyre prepared to hold organizational meetings in the middle of November, if thats what it takes. Theyve been trying to dial down the sense of urgency.

But all this is being done in the world of Twitter and the 247 news cycle, which usually doesnt have time for the long-range view. The Boston Herald, citing two unnamed baseball sources, reported Tuesday that Theo Epstein is on the verge of joining the Cubs.

Spokesmen for Ricketts and the Cubs declined to comment on a report that outlined two potential roadblocks in the negotiations: Red Sox ownership has hopes Epstein could remain with the team; and their demands for compensation would be high.

One industry source doubted that the Cubs would be willing to give up a major-league player like Matt Garza or Starlin Castro, which could set back their rebuilding plan for years. Another team official laughed at the idea.

Common sense has to kick in a little bit, the source said.

The 37-year-old Epstein would make perfect sense from a Cubs perspective, though there were caution flags that made it sound like there wasnt a done deal on Tuesday night.

The expectation is that Epstein could get a new title think president of baseball operations and report directly to ownership. Team president Crane Kenney who enjoys the support of Ricketts and has kept a lower profile in the media and the clubhouse in recent years could remain in charge of the business side in a realigned front office.

As the architect of two World Series winners including the team that reversed the curse in 2004 Epstein would bring instant credibility and signal hope to a fan base that is restless for change.

Epstein would have detailed knowledge of the Fenway Park blueprint that Cubs executives have been studying for years as they try to renovate Wrigley Field and generate more revenue.

Epstein would bridge the ideas of statistical analysis and traditional scouting something Ricketts explicitly wants as he assembles a team. He also has a reputation as a good guy to work for among the scouts in the field, meaning that he could keep intact parts of the current player-development system that Ricketts doesnt want to see torn down.

Epstein understands big-market pressure and the public aspects of the job after dealing with the Boston press corps for nine seasons. That its even reached this point without a contract extension for Epstein or anyone in either organization really shooting down the speculation is remarkable.

Ricketts pulled off the ultimate misdirection play when he fired Jim Hendry on July 22. Together they buried the secret and kept him on the job for almost another month. At that point, the Red Sox were in first place and would win 20 of their 26 games that month.

During that time, Hendry guided the Cubs through the trade deadline, closed on a draft class that cost close to 12 million and suspended Carlos Zambrano. Everyone from players to staffers to reporters was stunned by the timing of the announcement on Aug. 19.

By that night, the Red Sox were 28 games over .500, and 8.5 ahead of the Tampa Bay Rays. They were a 160 million machine programmed for the playoffs.

From the outside, it seemed like an extreme long shot that Epstein would want to leave his hometown team. He still has a year left on his contract and grew up not far from Fenway Park. But a stunning September collapse seemed to change the calculus.

After the final game of the season in San Diego, the Cubs stood around the visiting clubhouse inside PETCO Park, drinking beers and watching the side-by-side televisions.

The players became fans and didnt want to leave for the bus to the airport just yet. They cheered and yelled at the screens as the Red Sox faded away into third place while the Rays celebrated their mad dash into the postseason.

There are no teams from Boston, New York or California left in the playoffs to drive ratings. But this is a huge story that will generate buzz for the game, one man deciding between two historic franchises. Ricketts seems content to leave everyone guessing.

It needs to be a very private process, Ricketts said the day he announced Hendrys firing. Just to get out in front of it a little bit, we wont be commenting on any rumors of any conversations with any individuals at any time, nor will we be giving any updates or checking in.

At that moment, a good bet would be Ricketts trying to find a rising executive, the next Theo Epstein. Now, it sounds possible that he could be standing at the podium, with flashbulbs popping, next to the real Theo Epstein.

Brett Anderson’s personality mixing well with Cubs: ‘I don’t hate anybody yet’

Brett Anderson’s personality mixing well with Cubs: ‘I don’t hate anybody yet’

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. – Joe Maddon's T-shirt slogans can get a little old at times, but the Cubs manager found a new audience in Brett Anderson, who liked the idea of "Be Uncomfortable" after signing a one-year, prove-it deal with the defending champs.

"It's been awesome so far," Anderson said. "That's my running joke – we're a month into it now or whatever it is – and I don't hate anybody yet.

"That's a testament to the group as a whole – and maybe me evolving as a person."

Yes, Anderson's sarcasm, social-media presence and groundball style fits in with a team built around short-term pitching and Gold Glove defense. The if-healthy lefty finished his Cactus League tour on Saturday afternoon by throwing four innings (one unearned run) during a 7-4 loss to the Colorado Rockies in front of 13,565 at Salt River Fields at Talking Stick.

Anderson will open the season as the No. 4 starter after a camp that has been remarkably low-key and drama-free.

"I'm kind of cynical by nature, but it's a fun group to be a part of," Anderson said, "(with) young guys that are exciting and happy to be here. And then obviously the mix of veterans, too, that are here with intentions of winning another World Series."

To make that happen, the pitching staff will have to again stay unbelievably healthy. Anderson rolled with a general question about how he physically feels now compared to where he's usually at by this time of year.

"Obviously better than last year, because I was walking with a gimp and all that stuff," said Anderson, who underwent arthroscopic surgery to repair a bulging disk in his lower back last March. "No, my body feels good, my arm feels good and you're getting into the dog days of spring training where you're itching to get to the real thing."

Joe Maddon breaks down the Matt Szczur vs. Tommy La Stella decision for Cubs

Joe Maddon breaks down the Matt Szczur vs. Tommy La Stella decision for Cubs

MESA, Ariz. – Matt Szczur vs. Tommy La Stella appears to be the final decision as the Cubs shape their Opening Night roster.

That's assuming good health – manager Joe Maddon sounded unconcerned about Ben Zobrist (stiff neck), Addison Russell (stiff back) and Albert Almora Jr. (stiff neck) – and the Cubs carrying an eight-man bullpen.

Maddon appeared to eliminate one variable, confirming that La Stella has signaled a willingness to go to Triple-A Iowa if necessary, which would normally be an obvious statement, except for last summer's "Where's Tommy?" episode.

"I haven't even thought about it," Maddon said during Saturday's media session at the Sloan Park complex. "It's not an issue. I thought we handled it pretty openly last year and there's been no blowback whatsoever from the players."

Beyond this – La Stella initially refused to report to the minors last July, moved back home to New Jersey and talked briefly about retirement – an American League scout and a National League scout tracking the Cubs in Arizona both agreed that Szczur looks like the superior player.

Plus Szczur – and not La Stella – is out of minor-league options now.

"When you get this kind of a talent, depth-wise, it's a wonderful problem to have," Maddon said. "And then, of course, the rules start creeping in. The rules in this situation would benefit Matt, which is a good thing, because he's a big-league guy that's been riding the shuttle. He's done it in a very stoic manner, and he's been great for us."

La Stella has allies in the clubhouse – Jake Arrieta got a Coastal Carolina tattoo on his right butt cheek after losing a College World Series bet – and goes about his routine in a quiet, diligent manner.

La Stella is not a distraction at all and can hit left-handed and play the infield – two attributes that Szczur can't bring to Maddon's bench.

"Matt Szczur, to me, is a Major League Baseball player," Maddon said. "You're seeing what Tommy can do from the left side of the plate right now. And then it's just a matter of balancing things out. We've already mentioned that some guys on the infield can play the outfield within this group, thus it presents differently regarding what you need."

[MORE CUBS: Javier Baez won’t change his style around Cubs after World Baseball Classic: ‘We’re not showing anybody up’]

Szczur is hitting .361 with a .994 OPS through 14 Cactus League games and can play all over the outfield. But that skill is diminished when the Cubs already have four established outfielders plus Zobrist and Kris Bryant able to shift from the infield.

Then again, defensive wizard Javier Baez should have the Cubs covered all across the infield in case of an emergency. With the defending World Series champs a week out from facing the St. Louis Cardinals at Busch Stadium, we're about to find out if Maddon made his recommendation or had a possible trade scenario or disabled-list situation in mind.

"I love Matt Szczur," Maddon said. "This guy as a teammate – you're not going to get a better one. Nobody's going to get a better one on any team for any reason.

"We haven't decided everything or anything yet. Stuff happens in a very short period of time. He is a major-league baseball player. So we'll just wait a couple more days, see how it plays out. But he's a benefit to any group that has him."