Time running out in Cubs rotation battle

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Time running out in Cubs rotation battle

Saturday, March 12, 2011Posted: 4:00 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

MESA, Ariz. Randy Wells didnt need a media-training seminar to know this: Pitch well and all the critics will back off. Everyone will start writing nice things about you again.

No one expected Wells to win 12 games as a rookie in 2009. Everyone had an opinion on what went wrong last year, when he lost 14 games, a number that overshadowed his 32 starts and 194.1 innings.

At 28, Wells has a perspective and a sense of humor about the way it works. On Thursday morning, he sat through a session on dealing with reporters and social media run by a Major League Baseball representative. He then went out and limited the Indians to one hit in four scoreless innings.

Afterward, Wells was asked if he had the inside track to a spot in the rotation, which is what the image-makers call a vulnerable question. He smiled and went into full-clich mode.

Its all up to Q, Wells said. Im just one man.

Manager Mike Quade isnt prepared to publicly announce his fourth and fifth starters just yet. But its hard to ignore what Wells has done, stringing together nine scoreless innings through his first three games.

Just keep it rolling, Quade said.
Decision time
At a certain point, every day seems exactly the same in spring training. You lose sight of how quickly time is slipping away. There is the illusion that Opening Day is still almost three weeks away.

But decision time is fast approaching, which is what makes every inning so critical for Carlos Silva.

Another wave of cuts is expected around St. Patricks Day. For the group of pitchers trying to make the rotation, there might only be one or two more chances to make an impression and thats if front-office opinions havent already hardened.

By now its clear that the Cubs are not backing off at all from the Andrew Cashner experiment. Any doubts they may have had about moving the 24-year-old into the rotation were gone once they signed Kerry Wood and imported Matt Garza.

This isnt robbing the bullpen, because Wood will be the right-handed power arm in front of closer Carlos Marmol. And Cashner wont have to immediately be a frontline starter though the organization thinks thats what he can eventually become because Garza is there to take away some pressure.

Cashner remembers sitting on his parents couch back home in Texas and watching Wood hit a homer in Game 7 of the 2003 NLCS. He looks up to Wood and Ryan Dempster, two pitchers who have made 30-plus starts and saved 30-plus games in a season. They are always willing to help.

There may not be a more ideal time than now to fully commit to Cashner as a starter.

Hes got a lot of different folks around him that have (been successful), Quade said. He can really draw from (them) and he does listen (well). I get the biggest kick out of Cash, because he is a country guy, but he pays attention and sees stuff.

This is a really good environment for him to attempt to make this transition and for him to be able to attack it the best he can. I think these guys would be the first to tell him groundball to short on one pitch beats the heck out of a six-pitch or seven-pitch strikeout.

Image makeover

Cashner has improved steadily each outing and the Cubs feel his changeup is close to becoming a real weapon. He can throw the ball close to 100 mph, but hes really learning how to pitch, set up hitters and hold runners on at first base.

Eventually, Cashner will reach the crossroads where people stop looking at his potential and start focusing on what he isnt doing yet. In a down year, Wells went from being the converted catcher, the 38th-round pick, the feel-good story, to a disappointment.

Wells can be funny my britches fit just fine and brutally honest. He seems to have learned from the experience, and by watching his 2010 starts.

A lot of it is just staying calm and not panicking when you get a guy in scoring position (or) walk the leadoff guy, Wells said. (Its) trying to keep your wits about you. (If) a guy gets a hit and scores a run, its not the end of the world.

When things got bad, I tried to force things instead of now just taking a deep breath, relaxing, evaluating the situation and making a good pitch.

Its not as easy as flipping a switch, but Wells and Cashner have shown enough growth that it wouldnt be surprising to see them starting April 4 and 5 at Wrigley Field.

(Sometimes) you almost pitch like you dont want to go down rather than stay, Wells said. (When) you pitch aggressive, (like) this is your job and this is your livelihood and nobodys going to take it from you rather than pitching to not get sent down (that mentality makes people successful.)"

PatrickMooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. FollowPatrick on Twitter @CSNMooneyfor up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

CSN will air six Cubs spring training games in 2017

CSN will air six Cubs spring training games in 2017

Cubs fans will get to see 10 spring training games on TV in 2017 as they begin their World Series title defense, including six contests on CSN.

The Cubs released their spring broadcast schedule Monday afternoon, featuring 10 games on TV, 10 on the radio on 670 The Score and then 27 internet radio broadcasts on Cubs.com.

Len Kasper and Mick Gillispie will be the broadcasters for Cubs.com games while Kasper and Jim Deshaies will serve as the announcers for all TV contests.

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Here are all six of CSN's broadcasts (all game times in Mountain Time Zone): 

—Wednesday, March 15 (7:05 p.m.) vs. Diamondbacks
—Sunday, March 19 (7:05 p.m.) vs. Royals
—Wednesday, March 22 (6:05 p.m.) vs. Reds
—Saturday, March 25 (1:05 p.m. PT) vs. Reds
—Tuesday, March 28 (1:05 p.m.) vs. Giants
—Friday, March 31 (1:10 p.m. CT) vs. Astros

Here's the complete Cubs spring schedule:

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Cubs' Carl Edwards Jr. looks to follow in Mariano Rivera's footsteps

Carl Edwards Jr. couldn't dream up a better pitcher to try to emulate than Mariano Rivera.

Not for a young right-hander who is still getting used to being a reliever with a cutter as his bread and butter pitch.

After picking up his first career save late in 2016, Edwards mentioned how he has been watching video of Rivera. At the Cubs Convention earlier this month, Edwards name-dropped Rivera again in response to a fan question and went into more detail with exactly what he's aiming to accomplish by watching Rivera tape.

Let's be clear: Mariano Rivera is inimitable. He's a once-in-a-lifetime talent and there almost assuredly will never be a better closer in Major League Baseball.

But Edwards knows that. 

"He's great. He's a Hall of Famer," Edwards said. "He goes out there like he has the world in the palm of his hand. He's very competitive; I've never seen him back down. That's one [takeaway] for myself — I'm gonna go out and never back down.

"I don't really get into trying to be like him. I just look more into how he goes about his business. That's something that I can control — how I go about my business."

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Cubs coach Mike Borzello was there with Rivera in 1997 when the now-legendary cutter was born.

It's not fair to compare Edwards' cutter to one of the greatest pitches ever, but his version is pretty nasty in its own right:

The Cubs are still searching for long-term answers in the rotation, but don't have any intentions of moving Edwards back to a role as a starter.

Like Edwards, Rivera began his career as a starting pitcher coming up through the Yankees system. But Edwards actually has a leg up on baseball's all time saves leader: Edwards' first save came in his age 24 season while Rivera didn't tally his first save until age 26 in New York.

Edwards also struck out 13 batters per nine innings in 2016 while Rivera never posted eye-popping whiff totals (a career 8.2 K/9 rate).

As Edwards gets set for what he and the Cubs hope will be his first full season in the big leagues in 2017, his maturation will be important in an age of baseball where relief pitchers have never been more valued.

Rivera pitched in the playoffs nearly every year, routinely working more than one inning and posting ridiculous postseason numbers: 0.70 ERA, 0.759 WHIP and 42 saves while taking home the World Series MVP in 1999 and ALCS MVP in 2003.

The Cubs hope Edwards will be pitching in the postseason on a regular basis, too.

For now, the 25-year-old is still reveling in the glory following the 2016 Cubs championship.

He served as honorary drummer at the Carolina Panthers game in November.

"That was pretty amazing. That's a highlight of my offseason," Edwards said.

He grew up as a Pittsburgh Steelers fan despite being a South Carolina native, but Edwards said he did get a pair of Cam Newton cleats to wear for 2017 when he and Cubs teammates like Addison Russell or Matt Szczur throw the football around in the outfield to get loose.

Edwards was also blown away by the reception from Cubs fans at the Convention — "This is my third year and every year as been better" — but still hasn't fully wrapped his mind around the ending of the 108-year drought.

"Everything happened so quick," he said. "Hopefully in the next couple weeks when I have a break, I can sit down and soak it all in."