Chicago Cubs

As trade deadline nears, Maholm would like to stay a Cub

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As trade deadline nears, Maholm would like to stay a Cub

Paul Maholm hopes to still be a Chicago Cub after Tuesdays trade deadline. Maholm is one of several Cubs mentioned in trade rumors. In his final performance before the 3 p.m. Tuesday deadline, he allowed a run in 6 23 innings in a 4-2 extra-inning victory over the Cardinals on Sunday afternoon at Wrigley Field.
He held the Cardinals to four hits, struck out five and lowered his ERA to 3.74. He also became the first Cubs left-hander in modern-day history to throw at least six consecutive starts allowing no more than one run in at least six innings.
Hed like a chance to make more Cubs history.
Theres a reason I signed here, Maholm said. Ive always enjoyed playing here throughout my career. Theres an option. I finished the year last year hurt. They gave me a chance to come in and prove that I was healthy, and I am. Hopefully we can turn this into a long-term thing. Well see how everything unfolds and go from there.
Ryan Dempster and Matt Garza have been the Cubs most mentioned in trade talks, but Maholm could also be a viable candidate. He has won five of his last six starts and allowed five runs in 45 innings since his last loss June 23.
You battle throughout the game, Maholm said. I just go out there as long as I can, as hard as I can, and be aggressive and try to be ahead. Fortunately for me, for the last month or so, its been working out pretty well.
Maholm held the Cardinals scoreless for six innings before they scored a run with a David Freese single, Matt Carpenter double and a Tyler Greene sacrifice fly in the seventh. Manager Dale Sveum said he didnt think Maholm was losing his stuff, and Sveum liked the upcoming matchups, so Maholm remained in the game.
But he exited after loading the bases with walks to Lance Berkman and Daniel Descalso. Manuel Corpas entered and ended the inning with a flyout.
Manny came in and picked me up, Maholm said. Obviously, with the way that Campy (Shawn Camp) and (James Russell) and (Carlos) Marmol have been throwing, you hand it over to those guys and Rizz came up with the big hit.
Sveum said any manager would be upset if a player departs in a trade, and his teams starting pitchers have been good, including Maholm, who is surging. Last season, Maholm was 6-14 with a 3.66 ERA for the Pirates and dealt with a shoulder injury.
People forget that the won-loss record wasnt all that great last year, but he had a 3.6 ERA, which if you throw a 3.6 up there, you are in the top of the class with starting pitchers, Sveum said. Hes a bona fide starter, and this year you take away two starts, and its a pretty impressive resume this year as well.

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs and Sox gear up for the decisive Game 4 in the Crosstown Cup

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USA TODAY

SportsTalk Live Podcast: Cubs and Sox gear up for the decisive Game 4 in the Crosstown Cup

Sports Talk Live is on location at Guaranteed Rate Field to preview the decisive Game 4 of the Crosstown Cup. 

Kap is joined by David Haugh (Chicago Tribune), Sahadev Sharma (The Athletic), David DeJesus and Scott Podsednik. 

Plus new Cubs outfielder Jon Jay talks about his first season with the Northsiders .

Even as they find their offensive groove, Cubs know there's more left in the tank

Even as they find their offensive groove, Cubs know there's more left in the tank

221.

That's how many pitches the Cubs saw during Wednesday night's 8-3 win over the White Sox at Guaranteed Rate Field.

11.

That's the amount of runners the Cubs left on base Wednesday.

To Joe Maddon, those numbers don't quite add up.

The Cubs had 20 baserunners on 10 hits, eight walks and a pair of errors committed by Sox fielders. Yet they only plated eight, going 4-for-13 with runners in scoring position. Over the last two games, the Cubs have seen 412 pitches and scored 15 runs, but they've also left 24 guys on base and and gone just 9-for-33 with runners in scoring position.

"The proverbial grinding of the at-bats has been there," Maddon said after Wednesday's game. "[221 pitches], you'd think we'd score — I'm not talking about being greedy — we need to capitalize more.

"Eleven runners left on base. Again, I'm not complaining. Just the fact that we have to be more efficient as we move further along. Keep working those at-bats and I think if we do, at some point, it's gotta catch up to us in a positive way where it comes back to us and the ball's gotta fall in better moments, too."

The Cubs have gotten out to a 10-2 start to the season's second half, averaging six runs a game during that stretch and forcing the opposition to throw 154.5 pitches per game.

The Cubs have rapped out 124 hits in those 12 games as opposing pitchers have only recorded four quality starts.

And for all the issues with runners in scoring position in the first half, Anthony Rizzo and Co. are hitting .293 (37-for-126) with guys in scoring position since the All-Star Break. (Even with that, they're still only 27th in baseball with a .238 average with RISP, showing just how much the team underperformend in that area in the first half.)

The Cubs are starting to look more and more like the 2016 version of themselves as a host of other players — led by Willson Contreras, Addison Russell and Ben Zobrist — have joined Bryzzo in consistently contributing offensively.

"It's very rare when you have a game where everybody hits to their full potential," said Rizzo, who had three hits and drove in four runs Wednesday. "It's guys carrying the load one day and some other guys doing it the next day."

That's been a different script than the one the Cubs were playing off of in the first three months of the season, when only Kris Bryant and Rizzo were reaching their offensive potential.

As the Cubs hit their stride and gear up for the stretch run, they're finally starting to click offensively.

And what's scary is there's still more left in the tank.

"We don't wanna leave guys on, but we want to keep putting guys on to give ourselves opportunity," Rizzo said. "As long as we come away with the win, it doesn't matter.

"We're putting together good at-bats as a unit. [Seeing a lot of pitches] is a good formula for us. We know that if we grind at-bats, good things will happen."