What does Epstein mean by 'The Cubs Way?'

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What does Epstein mean by 'The Cubs Way?'

Theo Epstein had enough self-awareness to promise that he wont answer every question by referencing his time with the Red Sox, even if thats exactly who the Cubs want to be.

Professionally, Epstein had started to become stale after almost 10 years in Boston. He also understands that his staff cant rest on what they did at Fenway Park. He promised that his front office would have a research and development wing to discover that cutting edge.

Because everyone understands that this is the information age. The Cubs will focus more on on-base percentage and run prevention. They need to see more pitches, make starters work and wear out bullpens. They have to improve their defense, because they werent very good in that phase by just about any advanced metric or eye test.

But every organization looks at the numbers and hopes to build up the farm system and create chemistry. The Cubs are looking to answer: Whats next? And define what, exactly, is The Cubs Way?

The offseason officially begins after the final out in Fridays World Series Game 7. Epstein went underground after Tuesdays press conference at Wrigley Field and brought in his inner circle, Jed Hoyer and Jason McLeod, two Padres executives he used to work closely with in Boston.

So theyll continue to gather information. They have to make quick decisions on: manager Mike Quade and his coaching staff; the 16 million club option on Aramis Ramirez (which he can void); and Ryan Dempsters 14 million player option.

Epstein took this presidents job because he wanted to look at the bigger picture and create a vertically-integrated system where theyre playing the game the same way in the Dominican summer league, rookie ball, at Double-A Tennessee and Wrigley Field.

This isnt revolutionary, and it wont happen overnight. But Epstein will have a chance to help write the scouting and player development manuals, like he did in Boston, and remake this organization in his image.

Epstein will be given more resources than anyone else in the National League Central, and a direct report to ownership, so there will be no excuses.

During his first session with the Chicago media on Tuesday, Epstein went along with a question about last summers draft. The Cubs were aggressive and took risks and wound up spending close to 20 million in the draft and international signings.

Heres how Epstein described the reaction in the Red Sox war room: They finally get it. Theyre going for it.

The dollars that we spend in the draft (and) internationally (are) the best investments that we make, Epstein continued saying. It was a clear philosophical change (and) it got everyones attention in the game. It certainly aligns well with my vision for how to run a baseball operation.

McLeod has a good relationship with Cubs scouting director Tim Wilken, and the idea is that Epsteins front office will pool their resources, not shut out the Jim Hendry loyalists.

McLeod found impact players like Dustin Pedroia and Jacoby Ellsbury. Baseball America had his drafts among the top five in three of his first four years as Red Sox scouting director.

Epstein kind of rolled his eyes at the mention of Carmine, the computer system thats been played up in the media. He made it clear that decisions wont be made a by a laptop, that his staff will combine objective analysis with old-school scouting.

The way to see the player most accurately, to get the truest picture, Epstein said, is to put both those lenses together and look through them simultaneously.

Again, these arent earth-shattering concepts, and Epstein would admit as much. But its a clear vision that shouldnt get much interference from anyone else in the organization. He built up capital with a five-year contract and those two World Series rings.

In explaining his decision to leave the Red Sox, Epstein cited Bill Walshs theory that coaches and executives shouldnt stay around a team longer than 10 years. Walsh was 47 years old when he took over the San Francisco 49ers.

Now its time for Epstein to innovate and refine his West Coast offense.

Tom Ricketts mentioned how he sensed that Epstein wasnt content and still felt hungry. The chairman is betting that Epstein, at 37, is not one of those post-prime free agents being paid for past performance instead of future results.

Theres not one way to play this game, Epstein said. The Cubs Way will be a dynamic, living, breathing entity that changes every year.

Cubs Talk Podcast: Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with Jed Hoyer

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USA TODAY

Cubs Talk Podcast: Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with Jed Hoyer

On the latest edition of the Cubs Talk Podcast, Kelly Crull and Luke Stuckmeyer talk about the first week of spring training. 

The two discuss ace contracts, leadoff intimidation and give their thoughts on the Sammy Sosa saga. 

Plus CSNChicago.com Cubs Insider Patrick Mooney goes one-on-one with general manager Jed Hoyer. 

Listen to the Cubs Talk Podcast below. 

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

MESA, Ariz. — Cactus League stats are supposed to be irrelevant, especially for the guy with the biggest contract in franchise history. Jason Heyward already built up a reservoir of goodwill as a former All Star, three-time Gold Glove defender and World Series champion. The intangibles got Heyward $184 million guaranteed, and the Cubs are hoping a new comfort level will lead to a Jon Lester effect in Year 2 of that megadeal.

But Heyward will still be one of the most scrutinized players in Mesa after an offseason overhaul that tried to recapture the rhythm and timing he felt with the 2012 Braves (27 homers) and break some of the bad habits that had slowly crept into his high-maintenance left-handed swing.

"If there's ever any doubt," Heyward said, "then you probably shouldn't be here."

Heyward will be batting leadoff and starting in right field on Saturday afternoon when the Cubs open their exhibition schedule with a split-squad game against the A's at Sloan Park. If Heyward has anything to prove this spring, it's "probably to himself, not to us," general manager Jed Hoyer said, backing a player who does the little things so well and commands respect throughout the clubhouse.

"There's going to be growing pains with making adjustments," Hoyer said. "He'll probably have some good days and some bad days. But I think the most important thing is that he feels comfortable and uses these five weeks to lock in and get ready for the Cardinals."

The Cubs are betting on Heyward's age (27), track record (three seasons where he showed up in the National League MVP voting), understanding of the strike zone (.346 career on-base percentage) and willingness to break down his swing this winter at the team's Arizona complex.

At the same time, Heyward realizes "it's just the offseason" and "a never-ending process in baseball." There are no sweeping conclusions to be made when the opposing starting pitcher showers, talks to the media and leaves the stadium before the game ends.

"I'm not sitting here telling you: 'Oh, I know for sure what's going to happen,'" Heyward said. "I don't know how it's going to go. But I know I did a damn good job of preparing for it."

[MORE CUBS: No hard feelings: Cubs and Pedro Strop look to future with contract extension]

Manager Joe Maddon — who gave Heyward nearly 600 plate appearances to figure it out during the regular season (.631 OPS) before turning him into a part-time outfielder in the playoffs (5-for-48) — usually thinks batting practice is overrated or a waste of time. But at 6-foot-5 — and with so much riding on an offensive resurgence — Heyward is hard to miss.

"I can see it's a lot freer and the ball's coming off hotter," Maddon said. "But it's all about game. I'm really eager for him, because everybody just talks about all the work he's done all winter.

"Conversationally with him, I sense or feel like he feels good about it and that he's kind of at a nice peaceful moment with himself. So it will be really fun to watch."

A 103-win season, an American League-style lineup that scored 808 runs, a new appreciation for defensive metrics and a professional attitude helped provide cover for Heyward, who largely escaped the wrath of Cubs fans with little patience for big-ticket free agents.

"Baseball is a game that's going to humble you every day," Heyward said. "You're going to fail more times than you succeed, so it's all about how you handle it, as an individual and as a group. We handled it the best out of anyone last year as a team. And that's why we were able to win the World Series.

"There's always things you feel like you need to work on. You can ask guys who had the best years — there's always something they're trying to improve on and something they don't feel great about at a certain point in time during the year.

"I just happened to have a little bit more breaking down to do. A lot of things allowed me to just kind of pause (and) look forward and not really think about trying to compete and win a game. Let's just get some work done."