What Ricketts wants out of next Cubs GM

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What Ricketts wants out of next Cubs GM

Monday, Sept. 19, 2011
Posted: 1:11 p.m. Updated: 10:40 p.m.

By PatrickMooney
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Even if Tom Ricketts doesnt know who exactly will be the next Cubs general manager, the chairman has a clear vision for how he wants baseball operations to be run.

In trying to find a balance between the new wave of statistical analysis and old-school scouting, Ricketts has reassured the Jim Hendry loyalists left in the front office.

Ricketts met with scouting director Tim Wilken for roughly 90 minutes on Sunday and gave him the authority to renew contracts which are set to expire at the end of October and make new hires within his department.

Wilken, who was already signed through 2012, was also informed that he will be retained next season. Several front-office advisors have gathered at Wrigley Field during this homestand to review the minor-league system and analyze the 40-man roster.

Im looking forward to seeing who the next general manager will be and working with him, Wilken said Monday. Nothings slowed up here and Toms always been supportive and pretty darn active.

Wilken who has not been approached by another organization yet did not get an extension. Vice president of player personnel Oneri Fleita recently leveraged interest from the Detroit Tigers into a new four-year contract that voided the existing season left on his deal.

The idea is to keep some sense of continuity as the Cubs head into a pivotal offseason. Combined Wilken and Fleita are responsible for departments that employ roughly 90 scouts, coaches and staffers.

Ricketts graded them both out at A during Hendrys exit press conference last month. The chairmans betting that those two employees will be viewed as assets, not liabilities. This executive search could last beyond the end of the World Series, so the Cubs will need people in place to smooth the transition.

Ricketts clearly respects the scouting infrastructure Hendry already built and doesnt want to see it completely torn down. Perhaps the last thing the chairman will want to hear from a prospective candidate is this: Youre doing it all wrong.

The Milwaukee Brewers have won with a homegrown core that includes Ryan Braun and Prince Fielder (at least for the next few weeks). Their magic number to clinch their first National League Central title remains at four after Mondays 5-2 loss to the Cubs at Wrigley Field.

Though vague in many public comments, Ricketts has consistently said that he wants to build a team from within.

The chairmans promised that Wilken will be given the resources to essentially find the next Fielder and Braun, the kind of high-impact position players the Cubs havent developed since, perhaps, the days of Billy Williams and Ron Santo.

Wilken is well-respected throughout the industry after working for Hall of Fame executive Pat Gillick in Toronto. He spent 25 seasons within the organization, helping the Blue Jays become World Series winners in 1992 and 1993. He ran drafts that yielded Roy Halladay and Chris Carpenter.

Gillick also designed playoff teams in Baltimore, Seattle and Philadelphia, but when he arrived in a new city, he didnt automatically call for mass firings and tried to work within the framework of the organization.

Adaptable is a leadership quality that Ricketts will likely look for in his next head of baseball operations.

Wilken left the Toronto organization nearly a decade ago, not long after J.P. Ricciardi, a Billy Beane disciple, cleaned out the front office. Moneyball has gone Hollywood, but all the best franchises now use a blended approach that combines sabermetrics with traditional scouting. Its not one or the other.

From the outside, it may look like Ricketts is meddling. But its significant that both Wilken and Fleita have been energized by the commitment new ownership has shown to player development. Theyve set aside their personal feelings about Hendry and will tell you that its a good place to work.

Wilken grew up with Hendry in Florida and they later played together at Spring Hill College, a Jesuit school in Alabama. Fleita played for Hendry at Creighton University and has described him as a father figure and an older brother.

Fleita speaks Spanish and has become a point man for the new academy the Cubs are planning to build in the Dominican Republic, where they want to find the next Starlin Castro.

Wilkens budgets were unstable during the final years of Tribune Co. ownership. Hes still found useful pieces in the draft, though Andrew Cashner and Tyler Colvin took steps back this year. He restocked the farm system enough to pull off the Matt Garza deal.

Affiliates at Double-A Tennessee, Class-A Daytona and Class-A Boise each made the playoffs this season, though the pitching at the higher levels didnt come as fast as the Cubs had hoped.

This summer Ricketts approved almost 20 million for international signings and draft bonuses. The mandate going forward will be to find more game-changers.

Hopefully were on to something, Wilken said. We can build this all together as a unit and put together a winner.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

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AP

Cubs, White Sox react to tragic deaths of Yordano Ventura and Andy Marte

The sports world woke up to some tragic news on Sunday morning.

Former major leaguer Andy Marte and Kansas City Royals pitcher Yordano Ventura were both killed in separate car accidents in the Dominican Republic within an hour of each other, according to multiple reports. A Royals representative confirmed the death of 25-year-old Ventura.

The Cubs and White Sox took to Twitter to give their condolences:

Ventura was a member of the Royals from 2013-16 and won a World Series title in 2015 with Ben Zobrist and Wade Davis, who the Cubs acquired this offseason for Jorge Soler. Ventura also played with White Sox pitcher James Shields in 2013-14.

Marte, 33, played a majority of his seven-year career with the Cleveland Indians. He was teammates with Todd Hollandsworth (Atlanta 2005), Kerry Wood (Cleveland 2009-10), and Miguel Montero (Arizona 2014).

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Why Cubs are excited for pitching prospect Dylan Cease: He's 'throwing lightning bolts'

Theo Epstein's front office is heading into Year 6 with the Cubs and they're finally talking about a pitcher as one of the organization's most exciting prospects.

That's how senior vice president of scouting and player development Jason McLeod framed his Dylan Cease report to fans at the Cubs Convention at the Sheraton Grand Chicago last weekend.

It was a tongue-in-cheek summation from McLeod after he spent the previous few minutes fawning over Cease, the Cubs' sixth round pick in 2014.

Of course, McLeod and the Cubs can poke fun at the lack of impact pitching the farm system has developed when the homegrown position players like Kris Bryant and Kyle Schwarber just helped lead the franchise to its first World Series championship in over a century.

Cease, however, has been one of the more intriguing Cubs prospects for years — a right-handed pitcher capable of touching 101 mph on the radar gun.

"This guy is throwing lightning bolts out of his arm," McLeod said. "It's really exciting. But we also understaned he's only in Low-A this year, so he's far away."

The Cubs expect Cease to pitch for Class-A South Bend in 2017 after spending last season pitching for short-season Eugene and the 2015 campaign working in the rookie league in Arizona.

Cease — who just turned 21 in late December — put up some impressive numbers at both stops in the Cubs system, posting a 2.36 ERA and 1.165 WHIP to go along with a whopping 91 strikeouts in 68.2 innings. He also only surrendered one homer and walked more batters (41) than reached via a basehit (39).

Control is obviously an issue for Cease, but the upside is evident.

"He's so far away," McLeod said. "He's gonna go into 2017 as a starter. As with a lot of young guys, it's gonna come down to command and depend on that third pitch and the ability to land them for strikes.

"It's a special arm. He can pitch 95-100 mph with a big power curveball. He's unlike anyone else we have in our system since we've been here in terms of pure stuff."

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One fan compared Cease to Carl Edwards Jr. in terms of their lanky build and high velocity, setting McLeod up for a layup joke.

"Well, Dylan is much stronger physically than CJ is...as is everybody in this room," McLeod said as the ballroom filled with laugher. "Don't tell [CJ] I said that. 

"They have different body types, obviously. Carl is long and lanky and Dylan has probably put on 20 pounds since we drafted him, so he's more like 6-foot-2, 190."

By comparison, Edwards — who goes by "The String Bean Slinger" for his slight build — is listed at 6-foot-3, 170 pounds.

Edwards was drafted in the 48th round in 2011 and spent his whole minor-league career as a starting pitcher until the Cubs converted him to a reliever in 2015.

Cease may eventually go down the same path, but the Cubs are going to give him every opportunity to make it as a starter first.

Cease was one of the top pitchers available in the 2014 draft, but his stock took a hit when he was forced to undergo Tommy John surgery on his pitching elbow while at Milton High School in Georgia.

That scared off a lot of teams — as did the potential signability issues with college offers looming — but the Cubs took a chance and have now watched Cease soar to a top prospect in the system (No. 4 by Baseball America; No. 7 by FanGraphs and Baseball Prospectus) despite the cautious approach and lack of innings in professional ball.

"We have to thank Kyle Schwarber, actually, as one of the main reasons we got to sign Dylan Cease," McLeod said. "Because we took Kyle fourth overall, we were able to save money on the selection with him, which gave us the resources to go get Dylan Cease.

"He was a Top 10 pick in the draft — a high school arm that got hurt, fell down to the fifth round and he had a commitment to Vanderbilt, I think it was, and we were able to use the money we saved from Kyle.

"Just another reason to love Kyle Schwarber."