What is Theo Epstein getting himself into?

560420.jpg

What is Theo Epstein getting himself into?

Theo Epstein convinced himself that hes ready for the platform that could one day put him in Cooperstown. The only way this ends as a total success is if hes cruising down Michigan Avenue on a float during the championship parade.

Andy MacPhail was a hotshot executive with two World Series rings from his time with the Minnesota Twins, but he never got it done here. Jim Hendry had the Cubs one victory away from the pennant in 2003, and assembled a 97-win team five years later, but he couldnt sustain it.

Dusty Baker and Lou Piniella are two of the best managers of their generation, and both could wind up in the Hall of Fame, but each man was worn out by the end.

Epstein is sold on the challenge, with only the final details to be worked out between the Cubs and Boston Red Sox. The deal will give him almost absolute power over baseball operations for a franchise that hasnt won a World Series since 1908.

But at some point across the next five years perhaps after what Piniella once termed a Cubbie occurrence Epstein will almost certainly pause and think: What did I get myself into?

This is the lay of the land youve inherited.
Take the power back

As baseball czar, you will have to unify a divided front office. There are Hendrys buddies, the numbers guy (Ari Kaplan) hired by chairman Tom Ricketts and the new people Epstein will inevitably bring into the organization. There is a team president (Crane Kenney) who awkwardly inserted himself into baseball matters, but should now be focused solely on business operations.

Fans dont want to read anymore about how ownership instability undercut Hendry, but its foolish to think that it didnt impact the on-field product, and nave to think that freezing the major-league payroll wouldnt have consequences. The Cubs have paid the price after going all in when Tribune Co. had the team up for sale. The worst of it seems to be almost over.

Look in the mirror

Ricketts wanted an adaptable leader, not some slash-and-burn executive who would fire everyone. There are some capable people already in place, but it will be up to Epstein to decide whether Mike Quade is the right manager to lead this team. The Cubs view Ryne Sandberg as having a problem with Hendry not a grudge against the entire organization after being passed over for the job last year.

Bench coach Pat Listach has a presence in the room, and players trust hitting coach Rudy Jaramillo. First-base coach Bob Dernier has institutional memory and good relationships with the young, homegrown players after being a minor-league coordinator. You have a reputation as a good guy to work for, someone respected by the people on the ground. They all deserve answers as soon as possible.

Build an empire

The Cubs were late to the game in the Dominican Republic, and slow to expand their international scouting operations, but they essentially cover the globe now. You have to pour more money into those efforts. Ricketts already gave a four-year contract to vice president of player personnel Oneri Fleita, to maintain a sense of continuity and keep some major projects moving forward.

Even if Fleita doesnt keep the same title or portfolio, he has a valuable network in the Dominican Republic, where the Cubs will soon break ground on a new academy, and family roots in Cuba. Ricketts loves Jose Serra, Fleitas Latin American coordinator, the scout who signed Starlin Castro and the godfather to Carlos Marmol. All the kids Serra scouts want to be the next Castro. You must capitalize on that buzz.

Invest in the future

Roughly 48 hours before the 2007 draft, scouting director Tim Wilken still didnt know exactly which direction his staff could go or how much money would be allocated for their picks. The sale of the team, and the uncertainty at the top of the organization, handcuffed the department. If the next collective bargaining agreement doesnt bring major changes to the amateur draft, you should spend big.

Wilken is signed through 2012 and has been assured by Ricketts that there will be a place for him in the organization next season. Wilken once worked for future Hall of Fame executive Pat Gillick, back when the Toronto Blue Jays were winning World Series titles, and signed Roy Halladay and Chris Carpenter out of high school. Find the next big thing in the draft.

Feed the beast
Hendry went underground when he had to, but he also built up goodwill by talking with the media and telling his side of the story (and a steady stream of off-color jokes). Despite his silence during this search, Ricketts slowly seems to be learning this lesson: You have to be accessible. Otherwise the offhand quotes a guy to watch my baseball guy never go away.

Just like in Boston, the narrative will play out almost 12 months a year. Maybe the local media wont be as obsessed with your personal life, because you didnt grow up here. But all the questions exhausted even Piniella, who came of age in the middle of the New York tabloid newspapers wars, while the Bronx was burning. This wont be a holiday weekend on Marthas Vineyard.

Act in cold blood

As much as Ricketts appears to be committed to player development, the chairman really finds comfort in numbers. He wants data to drive more decisions. Hendrys interpersonal skills enabled him to close deals and bring in talent, but he sometimes got too close to the players. Then again, you made some of the same mistakes with free agents.

This could mean fewer no-trade clauses, holding off on the extra year tacked onto the contract, perhaps telling Aramis Ramirez to find a multiyear deal elsewhere. If you have any questions about the office politics and turf battles to come, you can always call Hendry, who thought highly of your work in Boston.

Soon it will be time to build a new machine here in Chicago.

Cubs: Theo Epstein believes Kris Bryant can follow in Dustin Pedroia's MVP footsteps

Cubs: Theo Epstein believes Kris Bryant can follow in Dustin Pedroia's MVP footsteps

Joe Maddon has been trying to find a chance to give Kris Bryant a day off.

But how do you sit the hottest hitter on the planet?

Bryant just finished a torrid road trip in which he staked his claim to the National League MVP Award by hitting .417 with a 1.365 OPS, five homers, 11 RBIs and 11 runs in nine games. 

That pushed his season line to .305/.398/.588 (.986 OPS) with a league-leading 35 homers and 107 runs plus 89 RBIs.

So is he the Most Valuable Player in just his second season in "The Show"?

"I don't want to get too wrapped up in individual awards," Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein said. "He's an outstanding player having a great year. It's never too early.

"(Red Sox second baseman) Dustin Pedroia is another guy we drafted over a decade ago and he did the same thing — Rookie of the Year in the first year and then MVP the next year. It can be done.

"(Bryant is) helping us win in so many different ways. Obviously coming up big of late, which is great to see. He deserves all the accolades that are coming his way and that may eventually come his way.

"But I think he'd probably be the first one to tell you he wants the team awards; he wants the team recognition in the end. The only one that really counts is winning your last game and the parade. Everything else is nice to fill the trophy case, but that's what everyone here is all about."

Bryant will undoubtedly split some MVP votes with teammate Anthony Rizzo (.946 OPS, 25 home runs, 89 RBIs), but the Cubs third baseman/outfielder woke up Monday morning leading all of baseball in WAR on FanGraphs' page.

[SHOP CUBS: Get a Kris Bryant jersey right here]

Even the Cubs admit Bryant has progressed beyond their realistic expectations.

"I would never have held him to this standard," Epstein said. "I wouldn't say, 'This is his development path. He's gotta go be maybe the Most Valuable Player in the league in the second year.' But at the same time, it doesn't surprise me.

"He's always been outstanding at making adjustments. Very cerebral player. Makes great use of his down time, whether it's the winter where he can work on swing adjustments or even the time between at-bats or pitch-to-pitch. He's just really, really good at making adjustments and thinks about his own game at a really high level.

"He's such a good athlete, he's able to take it right out on the field."

Bryant has also surprised Epstein and the Cubs with how he's evolved as a player.

"In some ways, surprising," Epstein said. "I thought he would always hit five to 10 opposite field home runs a year at a minimum, and he hasn't this year — that was his first one of the year the other day at Dodger Stadium.

"But he's added the ability to turn on the inside pitch and hit it in the air and keep it fair, so he's hitting more home runs as a result. So I never saw that coming.

"It's interesting the way his swing and his game have evolved."

In discussing the difference between 2016 Bryant and the rookie model, Maddon pointed to a decrease in strikeouts (from 30.6 percent in 2015 to 22 percent) and a smoother product on defense.

"The biggest for me is consistently shorter swing. More contact," Maddon said. "He's had smaller windows of chasing pitches out of the strike zone compared to last year when he did it more often.

"But recently, he's been using the outfield gap, which is really impressive. So offensively, that's what I'm seeing. Defensively, better feet on the infield.

"You'd see a lot of the patting of the glove as the feet were moving. I see it on occasion now, but not to the extent I saw it last year. He's still a great baserunner.

"So primarily — shorter hack, greater contact, less chase, right central is coming back into play right now and better feet on defense. That's what I'm seeing."

Put it all together and you have an MVP frontrunner entering September.

With season's final month looming, Cubs will apply lessons learned from 2015 playoff run

With season's final month looming, Cubs will apply lessons learned from 2015 playoff run

What a difference a year makes.

Last season, the Cubs put the pedal to the metal in advance of a four-game series with the San Francisco Giants at Wrigley Field in August and never looked back until they ran into the brick wall that was the New York Mets in the NLCS.

This season, with another four-game set with the Giants at the "Friendly Confines" on tap this week, the Cubs are in a completely different position.

There is no need for Joe Maddon to step on the gas and floor it into the postseason.

The Cubs entered play Monday 14 games up in the NL Central and they've already started counting down their magic number before the calendar has even flipped to September.

This year, it's going to be about rest and keeping guys sharp and fresh entering October, which the Cubs learned is key after last season.

Right now, the Cubs don't need to lean on Jake Arrieta to come close to a complete game each time out or utilize relievers on three straight nights in tight ballgames.

"I think our guys understand where we're at and it's going to be important to get where we want to go to be at their best," Cubs president of baseball operations Theo Epstein said Monday at Wrigley. "Last year's stretch and playoffs especially was instructive.

"I think we pushed guys hard during the year and it'd be nice for them to be at their absolute best during the most important time of year down the stretch and hopefully into October."

[SHOP: Gear up, Cubs fans!]

The Cubs also have some reinforcements on the way with rosters expanding to 40 players Thursday.

Tommy La Stella continues to work out in the minor leagues and Epstein acknowledged Monday the left-handed role player could be back in Chicago as soon as this week.

"The guys coming up will get some playing time," Maddon said. "I've always talked about in a bad game or even in a really good game, to get guys off their feet, that's important.

"Whoever we're going to bring up right now, they're going to be pertinent people that are going to help us win also right now."

Hector Rondon (triceps) and Pedro Strop (knee) are progressing "really well," Maddon said, with Rondon nearing a return while Strop threw in Chicago during the Cubs' recent road trip and reported no issues. 

"We're just trying to really play it smart, not push them to come back too quickly," Maddon said. "But they're both making great progress."

John Lackey (strained shoulder) is slated to throw a pair of bullpens this week and could return from the disabled list on the current homestand if all goes well.

When Lackey does come back, the Cubs could keep Mike Montgomery as a starter and go with a six-man rotation to keep everybody fresher down the stretch.

With all the rest in mind, Maddon isn't worried about his players getting rusty or losing their edge at all.

[RELATED: With John Lackey ramping up for return, could Cubs go to six-man rotation?]

Maddon admitted he's never been in a position like this where the Cubs are close to locking up a playoff spot and still have a month to play. But he compared the idea of taking the foot off the gas to the same way teams handle pitchers at the end of spring training before the regular season starts.

"You're trying to conserve their moments for the most important time of the year," Maddon said. "Regardless of any kind of pushback you might get from the players themselves, I still think you can do it and control it and not worry about the rust component.

"I think by this time of year, rest in a more intelligent manner - limiting innings or number of pitches thrown - I don't think that's going to cause a negative downturn in their abilities by the end of September."

Of course, just because the Cubs are prioritizing rest doesn't mean they're going to take their foot off the gas completely.

Epstein, Lackey and Jon Lester saw firsthand how quickly a large lead can evaporate with the 2011 Boston Red Sox

"I think once you go through a year in which you have a double digit lead right before Labor Day and screw it up and don't even get into October, you don't take anything for granted," Epstein said. "I guess that's the only good thing to come out of September 2011 for me - I'll never look too far ahead and I'll never take anything for granted.

"You have to have a broad perspective and look ahead and understand what might lie ahead, but you have to go earn it. That's been our team's approach from the very beginning - not to accept some of the praise that's come our way. It's to go out and try to earn it with our play and that's definitely true in the month of September."

Why Dodgers could be a playoff problem for Cubs

Why Dodgers could be a playoff problem for Cubs

LOS ANGELES – Imagine a Los Angeles Dodgers team doing more with less getting Clayton Kershaw back to start Game 1 of a playoff series. That could become a nightmare matchup for the Cubs, if Rich Hill stays healthy and continues his late-career renaissance, and if rookie phenom Julio Urias saves enough bullets for October.   

“They would be a tough team,” said Ben Zobrist, a World Series hero last year with the Kansas City Royals, the switch-hitter the Cubs signed with October specifically in mind. “We would have our hands full because of all the lefties they have. 

“We have to do a better job against lefties overall – and figuring out how to just get more runners on base. We tend to rely on the homer a little bit too much. And in those situations, (we) have to find a way to just take our hits and hit line drives around the park.”

On Sunday afternoon at Dodger Stadium, the Cubs didn’t have any answers for Brock Stewart, a 24-year-old right-hander out of Illinois State University who matched $155 million lefty Jon Lester for five scoreless innings. The Dodgers manufactured a 1-0 victory, and might have swept the best team in baseball out of Chavez Ravine if not for Kris Bryant’s MVP game on Friday night.

[SHOP: Gear up, Cubs fans!]   

“They have a veteran group on the field,” manager Joe Maddon said. “They’re always able to come up with another pitcher somehow. They got a really good bullpen. For right now, they’ve been utilized a lot, so I don’t know how that’s going to hold up, but they are good.”

Maddon couldn’t resist taking a few passive-aggressive shots, but he did compare this Los Angeles bullpen to the 2002 Anaheim Angels team that won the World Series and gave him a championship ring as Mike Scioscia’s bench coach.
  
Kershaw (11-2, 1.79 ERA) appeared to be rolling toward his fourth National League Cy Young Award when he went on the disabled list with lower back pain in late June.

“Kershaw coming off a back injury, you just don’t know,” Maddon said. “Hill’s good. He’s reinvented. He’s a curveball pitcher and all that kind of good stuff. So, of course, they can be good.”

Maddon wondered how Urias – who settled down after a rocky start to win a 3-2 game on Saturday – would hold up at the age of 20 after throwing only 80-plus innings combined last year at four different minor-league affiliates. 

“The biggest concern would probably be that he would run out of gas,” Maddon said, “not being used to pitching that late into a year. And I know they’re mindful. I know they’re going to do things to restrict him, whatever. But that would be the biggest concern there.”

[RELATED: With John Lackey ramping up for return, could Cubs go to six-man rotation?] 

The Dodgers (73-57) built a lineup around professional hitters like Justin Turner, Adrian Gonzalez, Chase Utley and Howie Kendrick. They have a two-way catcher (Yasmani Grandal), their own 22-year-old All-Star shortstop (Corey Seager) and a lights-out closer (Kenley Jansen).

“They’re in first place,” Lester said. “I don’t see why they should be overlooked. I don’t feel like they’re overlooked. Being a part of West Coast baseball for a couple months (with the Oakland A’s), I think really everything on the West Coast gets overlooked. I think it’s the time difference and a lot of other factors that are going on. But they’re a good team. They’ve been a good team.”

Maybe the Dodgers will expend too much energy trying to fend off the San Francisco Giants, and there are conditionals to Kershaw, Hill and Urias. But that left-handed-heavy rotation could mean the Cubs will be slamming their bats and helmets in frustration in October.  

“I’m not there yet,” Maddon said. “I’m not worried about the Dodgers. I’m worried about getting our guys healthy and us playing the game properly. If it comes to that, I would be more than happy. I would be ecstatic about facing them in the latter part of the season. They can throw as many lefties as they want. They’re good, but I can’t worry about the Dodgers.”