Without Pena and Garza, Rays still fight Goliath

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Without Pena and Garza, Rays still fight Goliath

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011Posted: 12:05 a.m.

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com Cubs Insider Follow @CSNMooney
The other day, Carlos Pena looked up at the TV screen and stopped in the middle of the clubhouse. He stood there transfixed, watching highlights from the Red Sox-Rays game at Fenway Park.

Pena doesnt seem to have any regrets about coming to Chicago. In fact, hed be very interested if the Cubs offered him another pillow contract. But part of him still belongs in Tampa Bay.

The Rays are at it again, chasing the Yankees and making the Red Sox sweat. They were nine games out of a playoff spot on Sept. 2. They entered the wild-card race on Tuesday one game behind the Red Sox in the loss column.

To see the David and Goliath story unfold and materialize in real life is cool, Pena said. I get a kick out of that, seeing the underdog triumph over the mighty empire. You sit there and you want it to happen. I lived through that. I experienced it. I know how incredible it feels.

How can you not pull for the underdog?

The Rays are doing it with a 41 million payroll thats second-to-last in the majors, according to the USA Today salary database. Thats a fraction of what the superpowers spend in New York (203 million) and Boston (162 million).

The Cubs will spend around 135 million for another fifth-place finish. Thats why chairman Tom Ricketts is looking for a new general manager and will almost certainly study what the Rays have done.

Everything that were watching right now was laid a brick at a time, Pena said.

Changes are coming. The Cubs announced Tuesday that Gary Hughes a special assistant to fired general manager Jim Hendry and one of Baseball Americas top 10 scouts of the 20th century will not return next season.

Andrew Friedman graduated from Tulane University and worked on Wall Street before rising to be the Rays executive vice president of baseball operations. But his front office certainly isnt all about statistical analysis.

The Rays have used a starting pitcher under the age of 30 for 754 straight games, a major-league record. All 153 games this season have been started by a pitcher drafted and developed by the organization.

The Rays rotation began Tuesday with 1000.1 innings pitched, the second-most in the majors. They led the American League with a 3.49 ERA, 780 strikeouts and 15 complete games. They havent missed Matt Garza, who was shipped to the North Side in an eight-player deal last winter.

They harp on pitching and defense, Garza said. Its kind of ridiculous over there. (Its) unbelievable how they just keep funneling through.

Thats the vision Ricketts has laid out as the Cubs try to rebuild.

Speculation has Friedman as a person of interest in this search, though he has such a good relationship with his bosses that he works without a contract. Hes also said to have strong roots in Houston that could make him more interested in one day running the Astros.

Pena whos been suspected of writing inspirational messages on the erase board in the Cubs clubhouse remembers one saying in particular that manager Joe Maddon once put up for the Rays: Fortune favors the bold.

That sums it up, Pena said. This team is so unconventional, so unafraid to be themselves. Theyre not consumed by following rules. (So) Joe will be the guy who will bring six guys in the infield and (its like): What is he doing? And he doesnt care if it doesnt work.

The other day they stole like seven bases. Theres some freedom there.

That could be the major difference between Tampa Bay and Chicago. There wont be a blank canvas at Clark and Addison. The next general manager will inherit several key employees in the front office, as well as the bad contracts already on the books.

When Ricketts looks at an executives track record of success, hell have to take into account the limiting factors and decide how it will translate. It helped that the Rays had so many consecutive years at the top of the draft.

When building a roster, the Rays dont necessarily have to worry about selling tickets, because almost no one goes to their games anyway. The media spotlight isnt nearly as bright in Tampa Bay. A franchise that began play in 1998 doesnt feel the weight of history.

Thats extremely helpful for them because they dont have to deal with that, Pena said. (Absolutely) its a (bigger) challenge to keep that type of attitude and mentality when you have outside influences.

But you look at the end (and) it almost seems like its a bunch of kids going out there playing the game of baseball with absolutely no attachment to it.

Pena means doing it the right way, without being overwhelmed by the pressure. He hopes to change the Cubs culture, where everyone wants to talk about what went wrong in the past and guess whats going to happen in the future.

The Rays lost 96 games in 2007 and went to the World Series the next year. They won 96 games last season. They sharpen their focus because they live in a world where players leave to get rich somewhere else.

Its always live in the moment, Garza said, because next years team is not going to be the same.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

If Nationals are playoff preview, what should Cubs do at trade deadline?

If Nationals are playoff preview, what should Cubs do at trade deadline?

WASHINGTON – Cubs pitching coach Chris Bosio has perspective after sitting through the darkest days of the rebuild, the sign-and-flip cycles and moments like “Men Playing Against Boys,” the way ex-manager Dale Sveum once sized up the team during a 2012 series against the Washington Nationals.

Bosio trusted future “World’s Greatest Leader” Theo Epstein, general manager Jed Hoyer and the rest of a growing front office would deliver talent during the 101-loss season that led to the Kris Bryant No. 2 overall draft pick and the Ryan Dempster/Kyle Hendricks buzzer-beater deal at the trade deadline.   

So while Bosio is a hardened realist who understands the banged-up Cubs haven’t played up to their potential, he also knows these are first-division problems. 

“If Theo and Jed can find a way to make our team better, you can bet they’re going to do it,” Bosio said. “But at the same time, they’re not going to sacrifice our future. They know that the team (here has) a lot of holdovers from the World Series club. There’s a lot of holdovers from the team that went to the National League (Championship Series in 2015). We’ve been through that. And when it comes crunch time, we produce.”

With that in mind, a look at where things stand five weeks out from the July 31 trade deadline as the defending champs begin a potential playoff preview on Monday at Nationals Park:

• If Max Scherzer flirts with another no-hitter or a 20-strikeout game on Tuesday, the questions will start all over again about adding a hitter. Javier Baez even let this slip over the weekend after a win over the Miami Marlins: “Pretty much not having a leadoff guy right now is kind of tough.” But shipping Kyle Schwarber to Triple-A Iowa is not necessarily the start of an offensive overhaul.

“Our focus is going to be on pitching,” Hoyer said. “I would never say never to something like that, because I don’t know what’s going to present itself as we get closer to the deadline. I will say this: When it comes to our offense, I really do see it as these are our guys. We’re as deep with position players as any team in baseball. These guys have performed exceptionally well. Most of these guys have won 200 games over the last two years.

“We believe in them for a reason. We don’t have rings on our fingers without all these guys.”

• With Jake Arrieta and John Lackey on the verge of becoming free agents, the Cubs feel like they should start working on their winter plans this summer and begin remodeling the rotation. The 38-37 record makes you wonder how ultra-aggressive the front office will be to win a bidding war for a frontline starter, but the Cubs are only 1.5 games behind the Milwaukee Brewers, a first-place team for now that was supposed to be rebuilding this year.   

But the Cleveland Indians got to the 10th inning of a World Series Game 7 with Trevor Bauer, Josh Tomlin and Ryan Merritt making nine playoff starts combined, because they had Corey Kluber and a dynamic bullpen.

The primary focus will have to be on the rotation, but adding another high-leverage reliever to work in front of lights-out closer Wade Davis would shorten games and help preserve Carl Edwards Jr. (170 pounds) and Koji Uehara (42 years old).   

“At some point, you’re going to assess your own team,” Hoyer said. “Sometimes strengthening a strength can work. You see teams that sometimes have a good offense – and add another good hitter – and all of a sudden we’re going to beat you in a different way.”

• Without making this summer’s blockbuster deal for a closer – the way the Cubs landed Aroldis Chapman – Washington risks wasting Bryce Harper’s second-to-last season before free agency and another year of Scherzer’s $210 million megadeal.

Six different Nationals have saved games for a 45-30 team and the bullpen ranks near the bottom of the majors with a 4.88 ERA. Can’t blame that on Dusty Baker, who has notched more than 1,800 wins as a manager and guided four different franchises to the playoffs.

But it won’t be easy to find a quick fix for the Washington bullpen or Cubs rotation. The American League opened for business on Monday with only three of its 15 teams more than three games under .500, and one being the White Sox, who are (obviously) not seen as a realistic trade partner for the Cubs.

“The American League is incredibly jumbled up,” Hoyer said. “That’s why a lot of deals don’t happen this time of year, because people are still sorting it out. The next five weeks of baseball will determine a lot of that. Some of those teams that are in the race now will fall back.

“There’s a lack of teams right now that have a true sense of sellers. I think there are a lot of teams right now that are close enough that they’re not going to admit it that they’re going to be sellers. That five weeks will determine a lot about who ends up on which side of the fence.”

Preview: Cubs-Nationals Monday on CSN

Preview: Cubs-Nationals Monday on CSN

The Cubs take on the Washington Nationals on Monday, and you can catch all the action on CSN and live streaming on CSNChicago.com and the NBC Sports App.

Coverage begins with Cubs Pregame Live at 6 p.m. Then catch first pitch with Len Kasper and Jim Deshaies. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on Cubs Postgame Live.

Monday’s starting pitching matchup: Eddie Butler (3-2, 4.19 ERA) vs. Gio Gonzalez (7-1, 2.96 ERA)

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