Wrigley transformed for Northwestern-Illinois

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Wrigley transformed for Northwestern-Illinois

Monday, Nov. 15, 2010
8:00 PM

By Patrick Mooney
CSNChicago.com

Watching Northwestern and Illinois play football at Wrigley Field should be disorienting and entertaining, like seeing Ryne Sandberg in a Lehigh Valley IronPigs uniform.

On the same day the Philadelphia Phillies announced Sandberg will manage their Triple-A affiliate, the Cubs painted their iconic marquee purple. Everyone is curious to see how this will turn out.

The vision for Jim Phillips began with the Blackhawks skating at Wrigley Field on New Years Day 2009. The Northwestern athletic director wanted to create a bowl game during the middle of the season. It is coming into focus.

ESPNs College GameDay will set up outside the stadium. Illinois alumni are said to have rented out most of the rooftop buildings. Northwestern players dressed in coats and ties will ride the El from Evanston to the Addison stop.

Saturday marks the first college football game at Wrigley Field since 1938, and its first football event in almost 40 years. Mondays media tour revealed a bricks-and-ivy space that was at once familiar and different.

The field runs east-to-west instead of the north-south alignment used when the Bears played at Clark and Addison. One end zone is in front of the Cubs dugout, while the other goes to the right-field wall. There is no net beyond the uprights, so field goals and extra points could fly into the bleachers or onto Sheffield Avenue.

That end line runs right up against the Under Armour sign in right field. At the back of the end zone, near the batting cage area, players can only take a step or two before momentum will have them crashing into the wall.

The Cubs, Northwestern and Illinois assembled a team of engineers and risk managers that concluded this is the safest way the field plays. One Cubs official mentioned how 5-foot-10-inch, 175-pound outfielder Sam Fuld dives at the wall without pads (or a middle linebacker driving him into the bricks).

Hopefully its just not like Arena (football) where youre running into and over the billboard signs, Northwestern wide receiver Demetrius Fields said.

This is about marketing, at a time when the Cubs are trying to convince the state to float up to 300 million in bonds to help finance renovations at Wrigley Field.

Chairman Tom Ricketts told the Chicago Tribunes editorial board on Monday that he doesnt have a Plan B if the proposal is rejected. On Tuesday Ricketts and a group of union leaders and business owners and residents from the Lakeview neighborhood are expected to hold a news conference at Wrigley Field to shape their economic message.

The Cubs are trying to grow revenue. Northwestern is hoping for more exposure. In a sense they need each other. Cubs president Crane Kenney along with Phillips will wait before committing to stage future games.

For us, this is a way to stretch our creative skin a little bit. And after hockey and concerts, well see where football fits, Kenney said. There are other events that were held here in the past soccer for sure, the circus, rodeo and everything else.

We want to see this one go well and if we still feel the same way Saturday as we do today, well look at other events.

Logistically, Northwestern will use the Cubs clubhouse, which struggles to accommodate 25 baseball players, much less some 85 scholarship athletes. The two teams will share the same sideline and be separated by some sort of barricade.

Tickets have been divided three ways. Northwestern received around 30,000, with the Cubs and Illinois almost equally splitting the remaining 10,000. One side of the scoreboard will show updates for Saturdays other Big Ten games.

The Cubs brand did a lot for Sandberg, just not as much as the Hall of Famer hoped. Now Northwestern wants its share. School flags are flying all around the stadium. Eight Northwestern panels flank the sides of the marquee.

Phillips who grew up on the citys Northwest Side and graduated from Illinois hustles to make the Wildcats what they bill themselves in front of the building: Chicagos Big Ten Team.

Our fans have been abuzz since we made the announcement back in the spring, Phillips said. Tickets (were) gobbled up pretty quickly and Ive found a few distant relatives that I hadnt heard from and some long-lost cousins and friends from high school I havent talked to in awhile. But I think thats been the case for everybody.

Patrick Mooney is CSNChicago.com's Cubs beat writer. Follow Patrick on Twitter @CSNMooney for up-to-the-minute Cubs news and views.

Brian Matusz will be spot starter in Cubs' series finale vs. Mariners

Brian Matusz will be spot starter in Cubs' series finale vs. Mariners

Joe Maddon is giving his five starting pitchers an extra day's rest.

Brian Matusz will be a spot starter in the Cubs' series finale against the Seattle Mariners on Sunday night at Wrigley Field. The Cubs optioned reliever Justin Grimm to Triple-A as a corresponding move.

"We'll use that day however we need to to the best of our abilities," said Jake Arrieta. "We'll find a way to use that day to get some work done and get better and move forward. At this time of year, every one of us might need to refine something.

"It actally might not be a bad idea. Hopefully Matusz is ready to come out and compete and be effective, and we'll move on."

Prior to Saturday's game, Maddon indicated that the club is looking to give his starters more days off.

"As we’ve talked about all along, attempting to try to give our regular five a rest in a particular moment, so we’re considering doing something right now," Maddon said. "We’re not ready to announce it yet just to be honest, but we are considering."

Matusz signed a minor-league deal with the Cubs last month.

The 29-year-old southpaw has spent the majority of his career with the Baltimore Orioles. In eight MLB seasons, he is 27-41 with a 4.85 ERA and 460 strikeouts.

As Matusz makes his Cubs debut Sunday, having a familiar face in the clubhouse might help ease any nerves.

"Matusz and I played together for quite a while," said Arrieta, who spent time with Matusz in Baltimore. "I've seen him pitch extremely well his rookie year. He can pitch, he's a smart guy. He's got some really good pitches that he knows how to use effectively. I look forward to watching him pitch and catching up with him."

 

Cubs offense mostly quiet as bullpen blows late lead

Cubs offense mostly quiet as bullpen blows late lead

The Cubs offense had a quiet Saturday afternoon just 24 hours after putting 12 runs on the board against the Seattle Mariners in Game 1.

The Cubs only recorded three hits in their 4-1 loss to the Mariners on Saturday at Wrigley Field. 

The story for most of the game was Mariners pitcher Wade Miley, who carried a no-hitter into the seventh inning before it was broken up by Kris Bryant.

“He was painting that outside edge pretty well," said Cubs manager Joe Maddon. "Honestly from the first batter when Dexter (Fowler) takes two fastballs for a strike and then swings at a slider, something’s going on for me. That told me the guy was on. He was.”

Bryant added, "He was throwing right where he wanted to I thought. He was just hitting the catcher’s glove. Working quick, that kind of goes unnoticed sometimes, but as hitters, it kind of keeps you out of your rhythm.”

It was the second time this week the Cubs allowed a no-hitter through at least five innings — and second time Bryant broke it up.

White Sox pitcher Anthony Ranaudo took a no-hitter into the sixth inning on Wednesday before the Cubs poured it on and finished the game with eight runs.

Lost in the no-hitter was Arrieta, who had one of his best outings of the season. But the Cubs had nothing to show for it, losing their fifth straight game when the NL Cy Young Award winner takes the mound.

Arrieta finished the game allowing two runs on two hits and three walks, striking out four in seven innings.

After a scoreless six innings of play, the Cubs drew first blood in the seventh. Fowler opened with a leadoff walk. Bryant broke up the no-hitter with a single. Following a Ben Zobrist bunt that advanced the runners, Javier Baez hit a grounder to third. Fowler tried to score and was thrown out at the plate. But after a second look, Joe Maddon challenged the call and it was reversed, giving the Cubs a 1-0 lead.

A couple batters later, Miley attempted to pick off Baez — who reached on a fielder’s choice — but Bryant stole home in the process. First baseman Adam Lind quickly relayed the throw over to catcher Mike Zunino, and Bryant appeared to slide under the tag. After being ruled safe, the Mariners won a challenge of their own and the call was overturned.

"That stunk," Bryant said. "I thought I had a good slide in there. Obviously looking back on it, I could have slid head first but that's one way to really get hurt. I thought I had my foot in there, but obviously (after) the replay, they overturned it."

In the eighth, the Mariners responded. Arrieta walked the first two batters and was relieved by Hector Rondon, who retired both batters he faced. Aroldis Chapman entered the game to try to get the final out of the inning. That happened, but not before the Mariners added three runs. A double by Leonys Martin scored two. Martin later stole third and scored on a wild pitch, making it 3-1.

"Didn’t see that one coming," Maddon said of Seattle's three-run eighth. "Just didn’t see that one coming."

The Mariners added another run in the ninth.

Slugger Anthony Rizzo didn't start, getting a day off to rest, but he came in to pinch hit for Chapman in the eighth, striking out. Willson Contreras started at first in Rizzo's place.

Joe Maddon hints Cubs could have spot starter soon

Joe Maddon hints Cubs could have spot starter soon

Joe Maddon hinted that the Cubs could have a spot starter soon to give his regular five some rest.

The Cubs manager said it's "possible" the player could start as early as Sunday in the Cubs' series finale against the Seattle Mariners.

Maddon would not confirm who the pitcher would be, but he said the move will happen within the organization and not via trade.

"As we’ve talked about all along, attempting to try to give our regular five a rest in a particular moment, so we’re considering doing something right now," said Maddon on Saturday. "We’re not ready to announce it yet just to be honest, but we are considering."

Prior to the All-Star break, Maddon gave Adam Warren — who has since been traded to the New York Yankees as part of the Aroldis Chapman trade — a spot start to give his starters an extra day's rest.

As the second half of the season slowly winds down, Maddon knows how important rest will be moving forward, especially with the Cubs bound to be playing in October.

"When you get the opportunities, take advantage of it," he said.

Cubs starters hold a 3.24 ERA on the season, which is tied with the Washington Nationals for the league's best.

Kyle Hendricks leads the team and also has the third-best ERA in the MLB with 2.39.