Your complete Cubs wrap-up from Monday's news

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Your complete Cubs wrap-up from Monday's news

So we know today got cray here for you all trying to keep track of everything from the MLB Winter Meetings in Dallas. (For those of you not hip, the word "cray" is short for "crazy." That's how the cool kids abbreviate it now.)

To make things convenient, we've decided at CubsTalk here to aggregate all the content into one big post. You know, just 'cause we're nice and cool like that.

The first news of the day was the best, by far. Longtime Cubs legend Ron Santo finally earned his bid into the baseball Hall of Fame. In a way, it's too little, too late, coming just 367 days after the beloved icon's death, but we still cherished the news and reminisced on our favorite Ronnie moments. Even Blackhawks president John McDonough got in on the action, saying he was "thrilled" for Santo's induction.

Another Cubs icon and Hall of Famer earned an accolade Monday as well, as Ryne Sandberg was named the Minor League Manager of the Year by Baseball America.

As far as moves being made, it was a rather quiet day around the MLB, especially for the Cubs. Theo Epstein's new crew didn't do anything specific, but they did meet with Albert Pujols' agent, only to let the word out later that it was because Dan Lozano also represents veteran Rodrigo Lopez, whom the Cubs are interested in bringing back next season.

Pujols got more attention Monday, but his slugging free agent counterpart Prince Fielder was anything but silent in the rumor mill, including word the Brewers may have dropped out of the sweepstakes for the big first baseman.

If the Cubs don't wind up with either Fielder or Pujols (something that seems increasingly more likely as time goes on), they could still bring back Carlos Pena if they sign him to a multi-year deal, or they could move on with an in-house replacement in Bryan LaHair.

Jed Hoyer and Theo keep stressing run prevention and they admit the starting rotation needs a lot of work. Word came out Monday that the Cubs reached out to C.J. Wilson's representation to gauge the market on the top free agent pitcher this offseason. Nothing serious at all, but an interesting move nonetheless.

Meanwhile, the Cubs' top free agent to hit the market, Aramis Ramirez, may get his wish if he wants to play for a contender. The Phillies, who have been anything but in "wait" mode so far this offseason, are reportedly in on the veteran third baseman.

Nothing too cray (there's that cool, hip word again), but it's just day one. As Theo says, it could take 100 conversations to make just one move.

Stay tuned to see what tomorrow brings.

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

Cubs eager to see the Jason Heyward relaunch in Cactus League

MESA, Ariz. — Cactus League stats are supposed to be irrelevant, especially for the guy with the biggest contract in franchise history. Jason Heyward already built up a reservoir of goodwill as a former All Star, three-time Gold Glove defender and World Series champion. The intangibles got Heyward $184 million guaranteed, and the Cubs are hoping a new comfort level will lead to a Jon Lester effect in Year 2 of that megadeal.

But Heyward will still be one of the most scrutinized players in Mesa after an offseason overhaul that tried to recapture the rhythm and timing he felt with the 2012 Braves (27 homers) and break some of the bad habits that had slowly crept into his high-maintenance left-handed swing.

"If there's ever any doubt," Heyward said, "then you probably shouldn't be here."

Heyward will be batting leadoff and starting in right field on Saturday afternoon when the Cubs open their exhibition schedule with a split-squad game against the A's at Sloan Park. If Heyward has anything to prove this spring, it's "probably to himself, not to us," general manager Jed Hoyer said, backing a player who does the little things so well and commands respect throughout the clubhouse.

"There's going to be growing pains with making adjustments," Hoyer said. "He'll probably have some good days and some bad days. But I think the most important thing is that he feels comfortable and uses these five weeks to lock in and get ready for the Cardinals."

The Cubs are betting on Heyward's age (27), track record (three seasons where he showed up in the National League MVP voting), understanding of the strike zone (.346 career on-base percentage) and willingness to break down his swing this winter at the team's Arizona complex.

At the same time, Heyward realizes "it's just the offseason" and "a never-ending process in baseball." There are no sweeping conclusions to be made when the opposing starting pitcher showers, talks to the media and leaves the stadium before the game ends.

"I'm not sitting here telling you: 'Oh, I know for sure what's going to happen,'" Heyward said. "I don't know how it's going to go. But I know I did a damn good job of preparing for it."

[MORE CUBS: No hard feelings: Cubs and Pedro Strop look to future with contract extension]

Manager Joe Maddon — who gave Heyward nearly 600 plate appearances to figure it out during the regular season (.631 OPS) before turning him into a part-time outfielder in the playoffs (5-for-48) — usually thinks batting practice is overrated or a waste of time. But at 6-foot-5 — and with so much riding on an offensive resurgence — Heyward is hard to miss.

"I can see it's a lot freer and the ball's coming off hotter," Maddon said. "But it's all about game. I'm really eager for him, because everybody just talks about all the work he's done all winter.

"Conversationally with him, I sense or feel like he feels good about it and that he's kind of at a nice peaceful moment with himself. So it will be really fun to watch."

A 103-win season, an American League-style lineup that scored 808 runs, a new appreciation for defensive metrics and a professional attitude helped provide cover for Heyward, who largely escaped the wrath of Cubs fans with little patience for big-ticket free agents.

"Baseball is a game that's going to humble you every day," Heyward said. "You're going to fail more times than you succeed, so it's all about how you handle it, as an individual and as a group. We handled it the best out of anyone last year as a team. And that's why we were able to win the World Series.

"There's always things you feel like you need to work on. You can ask guys who had the best years — there's always something they're trying to improve on and something they don't feel great about at a certain point in time during the year.

"I just happened to have a little bit more breaking down to do. A lot of things allowed me to just kind of pause (and) look forward and not really think about trying to compete and win a game. Let's just get some work done."

Javy Baez flaunts epic World Series tattoo

Javy Baez flaunts epic World Series tattoo

Javy Baez should win a gold glove in tattoos.

The kid with the MLB logo inked on the back of his neck now has an absolutely epic 2016 World Series Champions tattoo on his left deltoid:

That. Is. Awesome.

Javy apparently has had the tattoo for a little while, though it wasn't quite as eye-popping as it is now (or what we could see of it back in January):

😎 Find The #W #JB9 #ElMago

A post shared by Javier Báez ⚾ (@javy23baez) on

That's some good ink work, Javy.

Now just make sure you don't spend too much time in the gym working on those delts. That tattoo would look awfully weird stretched out: