Chicago Fire

MLS All-Star Game was a big event, but it's up to the Fire to turn Chicago into a soccer city

MLS All-Star Game was a big event, but it's up to the Fire to turn Chicago into a soccer city

The MLS All-Star Game was the marquee event of a multiple day onslaught of soccer in Chicago.

The league sent all of its marketing, promotional and financial muscle behind making it an extravaganza with the idea of boosting the profile of the sport, and by proxy the Chicago Fire, within the city. Ultimately, the game and the result were insignificant towards that goal.

While the All-Star Game won’t single handedly turn around the visibility and public perception of soccer and the Fire in Chicago, it was a marquee event on a big stage with 61,428 fans at Soldier Field and the Fire got to play host.

Before the game Fire general manager Nelson Rodriguez called it a once in a lifetime event. On top of that, the Fire had the player who turned into the face of the event, Bastian Schweinsteiger.

When it was announced that the game was coming to Soldier Field back in January, the Fire were still viewed as a laughing stock in the league. Back-to-back last place seasons will do that.

The Fire had already made some notable offseason additions in Dax McCarty, Juninho and Nemanja Nikolic, but by adding Schweinsteiger the team had someone capable of being a significant part of an event like this. The move had already been in the works, but wasn’t finalized until after the season began in March.

Schweinsteiger captained the MLS All-Stars and was one of two Fire players to start, alongside Johan Kappelhof. Only Toronto FC, with the trio of Michael Bradley, Sebastian Giovinco and Jozy Altidore, had more starters. McCarty and Nikolic entered after halftime and Schweinsteiger and Kappelhof exited. McCarty played a role in the MLS All-Stars’ lone goal.

The Fire had more players than any other MLS team on the roster, including the fan-voted captain. That the team is having a good season and had so many players worthy of All-Star selection is more valuable than the game itself being in Chicago. Having those two things at the same time is a bonus.

“I think we are putting the pieces together in our club,” Fire and MLS All-Star coach Veljko Paunovic said. “I think it’s very important to represent the community, starting with our club in the MLS. We had some progression. I think that also helps. Obviously the team is doing well, but being on the right path doesn’t mean you did it all. We have to continue with our process, with everything we have done so far. Improve our team, our results. From there in the coming years I believe we can light up the rest of the critical mass that is needed in order to not only have Chicago as one of the best sports cities in the United States, but we are missing soccer. We want soccer to be important in this city and in this community and obviously in this country.”

The MLS All-Star Game was a showcase for the league and the Fire in Chicago, with Real Madrid drawing in more spectators and eyeballs. It gave more attention to the winning season the Fire are enjoying, but the more significant events for soccer in Chicago occurred when Nikolic, McCarty and especially Schweinsteiger joined the team.

“I think that it was great,” Nikolic said. “The city deserved this game played here and Chicago is a city of sport. People like sports a lot here and they deserve to see these kinds of games.”

The All-Star Game is a glorified exhibition between a team that is in its preseason and a collection of players that had less than three days to turn into a team. It won't change soccer's standing in the city. There are already plenty of fans of the sport in the city, but that critical mass that Paunovic spoke of is likely only something that the Fire can chip away at over time.

Oh, by the way, Real Madrid won in penalty kicks after a 1-1 game.

With playoff spot nearly secure, 'now it’s about how good' Fire can be

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With playoff spot nearly secure, 'now it’s about how good' Fire can be

Things have been on the upswing for the Fire for the past couple weeks, but the players recognize the sharpness of the team’s unbeaten run earlier in the season still eludes them.

The 3-0 win against D.C. United on Saturday wasn’t all-out domination, but was the only comfortable win in the past seven games. With five games remaining in the regular season, and a playoff spot virtually locked up, the Fire is hoping to reach its heights from earlier in the year.

“We can start mentally getting ready to treat I think these next five games like they are playoff games, mentally getting ready for it,” midfielder Dax McCarty said. “We haven’t clinched anything yet so I don’t think we can take any of that for granted, but obviously with a couple good results in a row now, we’re feeling pretty comfortable about making the playoffs. Now it’s about positioning. We want to get a first-round bye so, like I said, these last five games for us, from my perspective, are playoff games.”

New York City FC is three points ahead of the Fire for second place in the Eastern Conference. The two teams play at Toyota Park on Sept. 30.

They already met in Yankee Stadium on July 22. That game was the first in a stretch of seven games in which the Fire lost six. NYCFC suffered an early red card and still managed to beat the Fire. The Fire’s struggles to create and convert quality chances was evident in that game and continued for many of the next several games.

The three-goal outburst against D.C. was a sign that the Fire may be getting the attack back in gear. David Accam, whose six chances created were most in MLS this past weekend, said the attack is not quite back to its peak.

“At the moment we are creating more chances,” Accam said. “We’re not sharp in front of goal. Before we were. We were creating, we were sharp, but now we are only creating. We’re not sharp. We are still working in training at trying to be sharper in front of goal in games.”

Defensively, the Fire has allowed one goal in the past three matches. In the previous eight matches, the team allowed 19 goals. As Brandon Vincent and Matt Polster returned from injury, and Joao Meira is right behind after coming off the bench against D.C., the Fire’s defensive record seems to have improved.

That doesn’t mean the team has a clean bill of health. Both Bastian Schweinsteiger (calf) and Juninho (knee) were not at training on Tuesday. Luis Solignac (thigh) and Daniel Johnson (knee) were both limited to running. Even without Schweinsteiger and Juninho, the Fire produced in a convincing win against D.C.

McCarty wasn’t worried the team would turn things around, but he has noticed more confidence in the team after getting seven points from the last three games.

“Certainly there’s more confidence in the group,” McCarty said. “We know we’re a good team. We know we can win games. Now it’s about how good can we be? We’re going to have to play our best if we’re going to be successful because I think we’ve shown that if we drop our level, even just a little bit, we’re just not good enough to win games in this league. We have to be very good every time we step on the field because other teams have certain aspects where maybe they’re stronger than us in, but if we can be at our best I like our chances against anyone.”

Notes from the rewatch: Fire win despite losing midfield

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Notes from the rewatch: Fire win despite losing midfield

Numerous times this season the Fire have been the dominant team in midfield, stringing 10 or more passes together to lead to a scoring chance.

It was role reversal on Saturday with D.C. United winning the midfield battle, but the Fire still came out 3-0 winners. With a few key names missing from the Fire's midfield, namely Bastian Schweinsteiger, the team had to find a different way to win and it did.

Here's a look at how the Fire midfield worked with Drew Conner filling in, how Arturo Alvarez changed the game and Bill Hamid being the best goalkeeper to give up three goals in a game.

The Dax McCarty/Drew Conner midfield pairing

With Schweinsteiger and Juninho out, Dax McCarty's midfield partner was Conner. The second-year homegrown player has played more at right back this year, but he began his pro career as a midfielder and still views that as his natural position.

Conner did have a few notable turnovers and wasn't as involved in the play. His 33 touches were tied for the lowest on the team among starters. McCarty had 65 touches and more than twice as many passes attempted (56 to 24).

It appeared D.C. wanted to force Conner into turnovers when possible. This play shows how D.C. swarmed Conner after he received a pass from McCarty:

Another thing worth noting from this play is how there is no support for Conner as he pushes forward. Nemanja Nikolic and the two wingers, David Accam on the left and Alvarez on the right, are too far from Conner to help him and he gets easily and quickly outnumbered on this occasion. This is a slightly unfair example because the player playing underneath Nikolic, Luis Solignac, had won the ball in the defensive third and gave it to McCarty, but the point is D.C. seemed to identify Conner as a weak link.

D.C. finished with 57 percent of the possession and had a number of extended stretches of possession, connecting more than 10 passes in a row. There were five sequences of 15 passes or more in a row completed by D.C. The Fire dropped off in the midfield, choosing not to press, but D.C. was able to break down the Fire this way consistently. The reason it didn't always go noticed was that D.C.'s forward play was lacking. Throw a Nikolic-type forward on this D.C. team and they could be real good next year.

Arturo Alvarez's big plays

With Solignac slotting into Michael de Leeuw's role, Alvarez got to play on the right wing and show off his left foot. He made a number of big plays, including assisting on the Fire's second goal with a cross to Brandon Vincent.

With Accam creating a whopping six chances on the left wing (although four came via corners) and Alvarez creating two on the right wing, the Fire killed D.C. from wide areas. Alvarez is known for cutting in on his left foot from the right wing and creating chances, either for himself or others. That's nothing new.

The key to Alvarez's play on Saturday was that he did some dirty work on the defensive end to go with it. He was credited with four tackles, four clearances and four ball recoveries. The tackles were most on the team and the clearances were most on the team for a non-defender.

Bill Hamid's incredible, unrewarded play

Bill Hamid was outstanding for D.C., but could only do so much. He made an incredible series of saves (see the highlights below) only to be beaten by his own teammate.

On the own goal, it appears Ian Harkes was trying to head it out for a corner, which is odd in the first place. He should have just cleared it up field or back to the sideline. Instead he headed it in the direction of his goal and gave Hamid no chance for a save.

Bill, your thoughts?