Ballantini: The Peavy comeback

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Ballantini: The Peavy comeback

Saturday, March 5, 2011
10:14 a.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

For the first time, Jake Peavy felt comfortable acknowledging what every White Sox fan was holding their breaths aboutnever pitching again.

When you do something as unprecedented as I did, tearing the lat completely off the bone, there certainly can be some doubts creeping in your head with what the future holds, Peavy said. At the same time, being an athlete and competitor who prides himself on being mentally tough and strong, you have to get it in your mind Im going to come back from thisI dont care what has to happen of what I have to do.

By being back on the mound just less than eight months since his devastating injury last July, Peavy has beaten expectations by some 150 percent.

I was told to expect about a year to come back, Peavy said. Thats the norm when you tear tendons. And this wasnt a minor tear, I detached something from the bone.

With expectations set very conservatively, Peavy submitted to surgery in mid-July truly having no idea what was in store.

It was experimental surgery, he said. First off, they asked me if they could videotape the surgery to have some documentation of it. Anthony Romeo out of Chicago did my surgery. I felt very confident in talking about the procedure, of how he was going to get it attached back to the bone.

Romero had to get his muscle from his back and run stitches, sutures and anchors into his bone in order to reattach and anchor the muscle, Peavy said.

I did watch the video, he said. Im not ashamed of what happened for worried about risking anything in the future I wish I would have had Tommy John or some other surgery instead where there was some history.

We had to sit down and come up with our own throwing program and rehab program. Theres not really any precedent set for doing what I did. You want to document everything, because if this injury was to happen again to another pitcher, there would be some help for guys coming back.

And yes, there was a game

While Peavy was the main story Friday and rightfully so, the White Sox fell to 1-4 in early Cactus play with a 3-1 loss. Kendrick was the nemesis, stroking run-scoring safeties in the fourth off of Jesse Crain and in the sixth off of Josh Kinney. In the seventh, Phil Humber gave up a run to account for L.A.s tallies.

The White Sox continued to be mostly anemic on offense, mustering just one afterthought run in the ninth inning. Jim Gallagher, who is playing as if hes the only one in camp who thinks he has a shot at the Opening Day roster, tripled leading off and was knocked home on a Brent Lillibridge single. Lillibridge, who might need to be reminded his roster spot is very much in jeopardy, then was picked off of first base by Ryan Brasier for the first out of the inning. The White Sox also loaded the bases in back-to-back innings (with one out in the fifth and none in the sixth) but were turned away empty-handed.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

White Sox snap skid by forcing, capitalizing on Indians' mistakes

White Sox snap skid by forcing, capitalizing on Indians' mistakes

The White Sox quickly ended their 23-inning streak of offensive futility and didn't look back. 

A three-run first inning propelled the White Sox to avoid getting swept with a 6-2 win over the Cleveland Indians in front of 24,444 at Guaranteed Rate Field Sunday afternoon. 

Tim Anderson led off the bottom of the first with a double, and after Tyler Saladino dribbled a ground ball through the left side, he came around to score on Melky Cabrera's sacrifice fly. The White Sox last run before that came in the fourth inning of their 9-1 loss to the New York Yankees on Wednesday. 

After Cabrera's flyout, Indians right fielder Abraham Almonte made a mess of Jose Abreu's line drive single, allowing it to skip past him to the wall. That error brought Saladino home and allowed Abreu to reach third, and Abreu later scored on Leury Garcia's two-out single to tag a third run on Cleveland starter Danny Salazar. 

Salazar was shaky over his five innings, striking out nine but allowing seven hits and issuing three walks. The White Sox struck again in the fifth inning when Avisail Garcia launched an RBI double off the top of the center field wall. 

Cleveland's inability to catch the ball helped the White Sox push across another run in the sixth inning. After Omar Narvaez drew a leadoff walk, Jacob May put down a sacrifice bunt and hustled to first, where second baseman Michael Martinez — covering for charging first baseman Carlos Santana — had to awkwardly stretch for Santana's underhand toss. Martinez dropped the ball, allowing May to reach.

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Following strikeouts by Anderson and Saladino, Cabrera lined a single to left, and Narvaez was aggressively waved home (a common practice with two outs in an inning). Brandon Guyer's throw easily beat Narvaez to the plate, but Indians catcher Roberto Perez dropped it, allowing Narvaez to score the fifth run of the game.

Another Indians defensive miscue led to the White Sox sixth run in the eighth, when an Abreu ground ball kicked off Santana's spikes and into center field, allowing May to score.  

White Sox starter Derek Holland was solid in his six innings, allowing only a solo home run to Francisco Lindor with three walks and six strikeouts. His toughest test came in the top of the fifth, when he issues a two-out walk to Santana to load the bases but struck out Lindor to end the frame. Holland lowered his ERA to 1.99 with his six innings of one-run ball Sunday. 

The Indians tacked on a late run when David Robertson threw a wild pitch that allowed Lonnie Chisenhall to score with two out in the ninth.

Sick bay: White Sox not worried about Zach Putnam, Melky Cabrera back in lineup

Sick bay: White Sox not worried about Zach Putnam, Melky Cabrera back in lineup

White Sox manager Rick Renteria said Zach Putnam theoretically is available to pitch in Sunday’s series finale against the Cleveland Indians, but he’s unlikely to use him after the right-hander left Saturday’s game with right elbow tenderness. 

Putnam was initially listed as being day-to-day, and nothing changed on that overnight.

“He’s available but would I use him? Probably not,” Renteria said. 

Melky Cabrera, who jammed his wrist chasing down a foul ball Saturday night, was back in the White Sox lineup at designated hitter on Sunday. 

Left-hander Carlos Rodon was spotted saying hi to teammates in the White Sox clubhouse before Sunday’s game, and is being evaluated as the team figures out what the next step in his recovery process from bursitis in his left biceps. 

Right-hander Jake Petricka was around the clubhouse on Sunday, too, as he works his way back from a strained right lat. 

“He’s been getting worked on inside there,” Renteria said. “We still have to see where he’s at. I don’t know what he’s going to do on the field yet. That’s to be assessed.”