Ballantini: Six-man savings sputter out

Ballantini: Six-man savings sputter out

Friday, Sept. 16, 2011Posted: 8:48 p.m. Updated: 9:10 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com White Sox InsiderFollow @CSNChi_Beatnik
The Chicago White Sox ran out a six-man rotation as of Jake Peavys return on May 11 and have flirted with it for the balance of the season since then, most recently returning to it by choice (strong starts from Phil Humber and Zach Stewart) and necessity (two doubleheaders in the span of 15 days).

The wisdom of sticking with the unorthodox approach wasnt only driven by starters merit but the thought that few starts at midseason could pay off with stronger finishes in the dog days.

Coincidence, bad luck, or failed wisdom, the six-man rotation did not pay such stretch-run dividends.

For the season, White Sox starters have averaged a 51.5 game score, 4.12 ERA, 1.28 WHIP and 19.0 outs per start. But if the season is cut off after games of Aug. 29, those marks improve to 52.7 game score, 3.88 ERA, 1.24 WHIP and 19.2 outs per start.

In the stretch from August 30 to September 15, the rotation has averaged a 42.4 game score, 4.64 ERA, 1.34 WHIP and 16.9 outs per start. Trim the recent slump more narrowly, to the last nine starts of the season (Sept. 7-15), and the other peripherals hover around the same but the game score average drops to a paltry 39.9.

We did everything for them, White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen said before Fridays game. We shuffled one to another to make sure those guys feeling strong. I dont think Coop, or myself can be blamed, that we didnt do the right thing for them to finish strong, because we did. We had many meetings about that situation because in the past Mark Buehrle kind of tended to lay down a little bit, Gavin Floyd struggled, Peavy was injured, Humber never threw that many innings in the big leagues. We did the right thing for them to finish strong. Right now theyre scuffling, but we put those guys in the best situation. We thought we were going to be in pennant race all the way to the end and thought it would help them.

Humber did not appear to be helping matters, with five runs (four earned) in the first four innings of Fridays game vs. the Kansas City Royals, lining up a game score of 32 to that point.

Ozzie twitterpates dangerously late

In eerie foreshadowing, Ozzie Guillen Jr., oldest son of Chicago White Sox manager Ozzie Guillen, remarked to media gathering in the managers office before Thursday nights game: Dont tweet after 10 p.m.

The son cited an adage that is akin to not picking up the phone for make a call and drunk dialing, referring to the concept of having less clarity in what you write as day turns to night.

Jr.s warning came into play on Thursday night, when his father got back to the team hotel and saw New York Mets manager being attacked by Harold Reynolds on the MLB Network for postgame comments that were critical of his players.

Reacting to Reynolds calling for Collins to be fired, Guillen let loose on Twitter, saying Thas all job is easy to judge manager from the studio, and U dont know what happen. His third tweet on the subject, as Guillen Jr. tried to ease him away from his tweeting phone, said, I know I play the game.

I dont know Terry Collins, a great baseball man, but I dont know him personally, Guillen said before Fridays game, explaining his tweets. But when you hear those comments he should get fired because hes not a players manager and you ask for a guys head?

Guillen thought Collins comments were childs play compared to what he typically says after a disappointing loss.

I stayed up till 1 oclock in the morning to see what Collins said because I think it will be fun, like, Wow, I might learn something from this, Guillen said. I didnt see anything. He just said the players arent playing good. They got swept and left so many people on base. What does the manager have to say? Why cant we get mad? Why cant we say whats on our minds? Why do people say, Well, the players arent going to play hard for him. Theyre going to hate him. Well, at the end of the day, if the players dont play hard for you, youre going to get fired I see the comment Collins made, and thats in diapers compared to the comments that I make. I know analysts are getting paid to criticize people, but when you call for somebodys head, thats different.

Among Guillens final comments directed at the MLB Network was a gem and probably a truthful one at that, given how in demand his services are for postseason analysis is whenever the White Sox arent involved.

Is if my english was better I be doing what u doing lol but you guys cant do what I doing or terry lol lol.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute Sox information.

Preview: Jose Quintana, White Sox look to win sixth straight game on CSN

Preview: Jose Quintana, White Sox look to win sixth straight game on CSN

The White Sox take on the Kansas City Royals on Monday, and you can catch all the action on CSN. Coverage begins at 7 p.m. Be sure to stick around after the final out to get analysis and player reaction on White Sox Postgame Live.

Today’s starting pitching matchup: Jose Quintana (13-11, 3.21 ERA) vs. Chris Archer (8-19, 4.02 ERA)

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Todd Frazier, Miguel Gonzalez propel White Sox past Rays

Todd Frazier, Miguel Gonzalez propel White Sox past Rays

Todd Frazier reached the 40-home run plateau on Wednesday night and now his eyes are trained on 100 RBIs.

Frazier’s seventh-inning solo home run not only extended his hitting streak to 12 games, it provided the game’s only offense in a 1-0 White Sox victory over the Tampa Bay Rays in front of 12,976 at U.S. Cellular Field. Frazier became only the seventh player in franchise history to hit 40 homers in a season with his 394-foot drive off Rays pitcher Eddie Gamboa. The blast offered Miguel Gonzalez and David Robertson just enough support as they combined on a three-hit shutout. Robertson recorded his 37th save in 44 tries.

“It’s a big deal any time a guy rounds off that number,” White Sox manager Robin Ventura said. “It’s always a big deal for you. He’s been wanting to get there for a while. I don’t know if you guys know, but he’s been talking about it for a while. I know I’ve heard it a lot. He’s been aiming for that. He wants to get 40 and 100 and especially if it counts like it did tonight and gets a guy a win.”

Frazier entered the game hitting .305/.374/.568 with six homers and 14 RBIs in September, easily his best month of the season. His homer came on a cold, windy night in which offense was at a premium.

The game was delayed for 21 minutes by rain, which continued through the first inning. The rains came again in the bottom of the third inning and delayed the contest for another 76 minutes.

Tampa’s third pitcher of the night, Gamboa’s 76-mph knuckleball caught too much of the plate and Frazier planted it about eight rows beyond the left-field bullpen with two outs in the seventh.

“Not many people have hit 40 home runs in a year so it’s a good feat to have,” Frazier said.

“It’s a great feat to have. I had a bunch of people text me ‘It’s coming. Today is the day.’ It wasn’t that much pressure. It was just a matter of knowing that it’s there and I’m glad to get it over with and now it’s on to another goal of mine.”

Frazier has never driven in 100 runs in a season. His 98 RBIs this season are nine more than his previous career high of 89 that he set in 2015.

Gonzalez hadn’t pitched into the ninth inning since he threw a four-hit shutout on Sept. 3, 2014. To get there he had to stay loose and sharp throughout the second delay of the night. Gonzalez threw twice during the delay, a total of 25 pitches in the indoor cage, and stretched to stay loose.

But being his final start, Gonzalez wanted to take advantage of the opportunity. He returned after the delay and was remarkable. He had stretches where he retired eight in a row in the middle and nine straight into the ninth before he yielded a one-out single to Logan Forsythe.

[SHOP: Gear up, White Sox fans!]

He allowed three hits, walked none and struck out five. Gonzalez threw strikes on 71 of 102 pitches.

Robertson took over and needed only one pitch to record the save as Kevin Kiermaier grounded into a game-ending double play.

“It’s been a while since I’ve been out there for the ninth inning,” Gonzalez said. “It took me two years to get there, but they were swinging early. I made some good pitches early on. Got some quick outs, that’s what you got me to the ninth inning.

“Staying loose was really the most important thing for it.

“I was mentally prepared. Obviously you can’t get away with it. It was my last start. I was going out no matter what and didn’t give in and the results were there.”