Ballantini: White Sox-Cubs all-time series notes

Ballantini: White Sox-Cubs all-time series notes

Saturday, June 26, 2010
Updated at 5:02 p.m.

By Brett Ballantini
CSNChicago.com

CHICAGO With rare exception, the Chicago White Sox have dominated the Chicago Cubs in crosstown play, dating back to 107 years to 1903, with an overall record of 171-121-8 all-time in 67 years worth of competition. Here are some facts and figures from crosstown history:

City Series (1903-42)
The City Series represents the most competitive games ever played between the two teams. Held concurrent with the World Series, the best-of-seven series was Chicagos own World Series, played for city bragging rights. Teams often gave out solid bonuses to players (sometimes bigger than that of the World Series itself), as the games were well-attended; this was a time when 500 meant a ton to the average player.
To that end, the very first City Series was marred by accusations of games thrown. Cubs pitcher Jack Taylor won his first City Series start, but lost the last three (the series finished in a 7-7 tie); subsequent accusations that he laid down for side money precipitated a trade to the St. Louis Cardinals. As a result, the Cubs refused to play the 1904 series.
The White Sox won the 1912 City Series, 4-3, amid similar accusations, that the Cubswho were up 3-0 before losing four straightlaid down in protest of unpopular manager Frank Chance.
In 1914, the White Sox won the City Series 4-3 after losing three of the first four games.
The 1924 City Series were the first games ever broadcast on local radio.
In 1925, a City Series won by the Cubs in five games, the opening game of the series was a 19-inning tie.
In 1927, the Cubs refused to play the City Series, purportedly because the White Sox were cheering for them to lose the NL pennant (the North Siders finished 8.5 games out) in order to earn some City Series money.
In 1934, Cubs owner William Wrigley thought the Cubs were laying down in order to earn the higher receipts of City Series play, and refused to play the White Sox.
In the very next season (1936), the White Sox swept the Cubs in the City Series and so infuriated Wrigley that he cut some players salaries and ordered all of his Cubs players placed on the trading block.
The White Sox were 91-60-3 in City Series games and captured 19 of 25 series overall (the teams tied in the first years, 1903).

Boys Benefit Game (1949-72)
With the City Series scuttled by World War II, the White Sox struck the series back up with a single-game exhibition to benefit youth baseball.
Although all but two of the games were played at Comiskey Park, the Cubs were 13-10 in the series.
A White Sox vs. Cubs-best 52,712 came to the June 25, 1964 game at Comiskey Park, won by the Pale Hose, 11-1. Fans were allowed to stand in the outfield during that game.

Mayors Series (1981)
Chicago mayor Jane Byrne proposed a revival of meetings between the two teams. August 7s game at Comiskey Park was a scoreless tie, while the next day the Cubs knocked off the White Sox, 4-3.

Exhibition Play (1982)
In 1982, both the crosstown exhibition games scheduled were cancelled...because of snow.

Windy CityCrosstown Classic (1985-94)
One-game sets were agreed upon to benefit team charities. The White Sox went 8-0-2 in these games, which alternated between Comiskey Park and Wrigley Field.
In the April 17, 1994 game at Wrigley Field, Michael Jordan started in right field for the White Sox and went two-of-four with two RBI in the 4-4 tie.

Tribune Twinbill (1995)
The Chicago Tribune sponsored a home-and-home series before the labor-delayed start of the 1995 season. Its holding didnt fare so well, as the Cubs lost to the White Sox 6-3 on April 24 at Comiskey Park and 6-2 on April 25 at Wrigley Field.

Spring Training (1998-present)
The White Sox hold a 22-16-2 edge in spring training play vs. the Cubs.

Interleague Play (1997-present)
Since official interleague play started in 1997, the White Sox lead the series 39-36, outscoring the Cubs, 367-348.
The White Sox have won the last nine of 12 games in the series and 10 of the last 15 series overall.
The White Sox have never won more than four games in the season series.
The longest winning streak in interleague play has been the Cubs, with a six-game streak in 2007-08.
Three of Paul Konerkos 23 multi-homer games have come vs. the Cubs.
The White Sox have won three of five extra-inning games in interleague play, all of which came between 1998 and 2001.
Mark Buehrle has five wins vs. the Cubs, more than any other White Sox pitcher. Buehrles career interleague record is 23-6, giving him more interleague wins than any other pitcher. However, hes just 5-4 vs. the Cubs, making him 18-2 vs. all other National League clubs.
Ozzie Guillen's career record in interleague play vs. the Cubs: 2-for-11 with one run, one double, a walk and a K.

Interleague Records
Konerko leads in most White Sox offensive categories, including games (56), runs (28), homers (14), hits (60) and RBI (41). Scott Podsednik leads the series with nine steals, Sandy Alomar Jr. with a .450 average (Carlos Quentin leads active Sox at .368) and Frank Thomas with 23 walks.
On the pitching side, Buehrle leads in wins (five) and losses (four), starts (12), strikeouts (57) and innings (79.1). Freddy Garcia has an amazing 0.41 ERA vs. the Cubs, Keith Foulke leads with 17 appearances and Bobby Jenks has four saves.

Brett Ballantini is CSNChicago.com's White Sox Insider. Follow him @CSNChi_Beatnik on Twitter for up-to-the-minute White Sox information.

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Todd Frazier wasn’t pleased with a call Saturday afternoon that led to the first ejection of his career.

It’s not that the White Sox third baseman is arguing about whether or not he deserved to get thrown out in the seventh inning of a 10-2 loss to the Oakland A’s. Frazier is more miffed by first-base umpire Sam Holbrook’s initial ruling --- that his throw pulled Jose Abreu off the bag --- and the determination by replay officials that the call was correct.

Frazier was ejected shortly after word arrived that the call stands, which means officials in New York didn’t believe they have enough evidence to overturn the original ruling. That fact bothered Frazier, who was charged with an error and began to speak his mind. White Sox manager Rick Renteria was ejected shortly thereafter for the third straight home game.

“It’s just frustrating with the technology we have today,” Frazier said. “It’s just crazy. It boggles your mind. It really does. You know -- I’m the one. I’m vocal. I’m emotional. But when it’s wrong, 100 percent wrong. I saw it on the MLB Network. I saw it in our cameras and our computers. I just don’t understand how we can see it and they can’t see it in New York. It’s just, it’s frustrating as all hell to be honest with you. It turned into a big inning. We were down a lot, don’t get me wrong. But still, Jake (Petricka) is pitching his heart out and next thing you know he gives up an unearned run and two more runs. So it’s really not that hard. Honest. It’s not that hard.”

Renteria raced onto the field in an attempt to save Frazier from a quick ejection, but didn’t have enough time. It was the third home game in a row in which a White Sox player was ejected for the first time in their career. Tim Anderson got the boot on Friday night after he argued with plate umpire Jim Wolf. And Avisail Garcia got tossed from the June 15 series finale against the Baltimore Orioles.

Renteria said taking into context who his players are and their track record made him want to further defend their actions.

“I don't ever go into a situation arguing with someone to get thrown out,” Renteria said. “I don't. I think what happens is, like anybody emotionally, when you start talking and expressing yourself, you have a tendency to get heated. You don't plan on doing that. I certainly don't go out there planning on having that happen. I think what happens, and I think it's just human nature, you start thinking about the whole situation, you're losing a player. You're losing a guy that's supposed to be in there for the next two, three innings to help you maybe continue to chip away. Our team has been fighting every day, since day one of spring training. I don’t care what our record is, I don't care what the score is, we fight. And when you take one of those pieces out of the lineup, you get pissed.”

Even though he had a chance to cool off, Frazier still felt the same after the contest. He stuck his head into the team’s video room after the game to check out the play. Teams have a variety of angles from which they can determine whether or not to challenge a call. They also have the option of taking a freeze frame and magnifying the picture, which left no doubt in Frazier’s mind that the call was incorrect.

“Like I said just frustrating,” Frazier said. “It’s just not that hard. And with all the technology like I said, I don’t mean to repeat ourselves, but with all the technology and 8 different angles it’s just one of those things where I just can’t let that go. It turned into a huge inning. You never know. We were down 6 we coulda came back. You gotta be 100 percent. You gotta be 100 percent right on that and I really don’t think he was.”