The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

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The best White Sox All-Star Game performances

It's been 79 years since the first MLB All-Star Game was held at old Comiskey Park on July 6, 1933. Since then, there have been 142 appearances by a White Sox player in the midsummer classic. Below are a few of the best performances:

Position players:

Al Simmons (1934): 3-5, 2 2B, 1 RBI, 3 R

The only White Sox player to ever record three hits in an All-Star Game, Simmons batted sixth in the second-ever All-Star Game behind Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig and Jimmie Foxx -- and had as many hits as those three combined. Only Earl Averill had a more positive impact on the American League's 9-7 win, as the Indians Hall of Famer tripled and drove in three.

Paul Konerko (2002): 2-2, 2 2B, 2 RBI

Playing in his first All-Star Game, Konerko built a legitimate MVP case -- except that award wasn't handed out in the infamous 7-7 tie at Miller Park. Konerko replaced starter Jason Giambi in the fourth and hit a ground-rule double, then drove in a pair of runs on his second double, coming off Diamondbacks reliever Byung-Hyun Kim. Konerko's .433 WPA was not only the highest in the game, but it represented the most positive impact a White Sox player has ever had on an All-Star Game.

Nellie Fox (1954): 1-2, 2 RBI

A two-out, two-run single by Fox broke a 9-9 tie in the top of the ninth in Cleveland, netting the American League an 11-9 victory. The single by Fox brought home a pair of legendary Yankees -- Mickey Mantle and Yogi Berra. Of note: Not surprisingly, Fox has the most two-hit All-Star Games of any White Sox player, accomplishing that feat four times. Konerko, Minnie Minoso and Al Simmons have multiple hits multiple times in a midsummer classic.

Frank Thomas (1995): 1-2, HR, 2 RBI

Thomas provided all the runs for the American League in '95, with his fourth-inning two-run homer off John Smiley bringing home Cleveland's Carlos Baerga. He's only one of two White Sox players to ever homer in an All-Star Game along with Magglio Ordonez, who blasted a solo homer off Jon Lieber in the 2001 contest at Safeco Field.

Pitchers:

Gary Peters (1967): 3 IP, 0 H, 0 ER, 4 K, 0 BB

Peters struck out Willie Mays, Roberto Clemente, Orlando Cepeda and Dick Allen. He also got Hank Aaron to ground out. That's, well, pretty successful.

Billy Pierce (1955): 3 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

A White Sox pitcher started four All-Star Games in the 1950s, with Pierce starting three including 1955's contest. After allowing a leadoff single to St. Louis' Red Schoendienst, Pierce retired the next nine batters, including Duke Snider and Ernie Banks on strikes. No. 19 also holds the record for most strikeouts by a Sox player in an All-Star Game with five, which came in 1956.

Mark Buehrle (2005): 2 IP, 3 H, 0 ER, 3 K, 0 BB

Pitching the best season of his career, Buehrle started the '05 game in Detroit and struck out Derrek Lee, Mike Piazza and Jeff Kent. He quickly erased a leadoff single to Bobby Abreu by getting Carlos Beltran to ground into a double play. An interesting note: Six times has a White Sox pitcher started an All-Star Game, and all have come in either the 1950s or 2000s.

Esteban Loaiza (2003): 2 IP, 1 H, 0 ER, 1 K, 0 BB

Statistically, Loaiza's performance doesn't stand out against other Sox All-Star hurlers, but that he started the 2003 game at U.S. Cellular Field was pretty neat.

Discomfort sidelines White Sox infielder Brett Lawrie

Discomfort sidelines White Sox infielder Brett Lawrie

GLENDALE, Ariz. — The White Sox held Brett Lawrie out Saturday after he reported discomfort in the same left leg that sidelined him for the final 2 1/2 months of 2016.

The second baseman has been a full participant the entire spring until he informed manager Rick Renteria what he was experiencing Saturday. 

"We're going to reevaluate him tomorrow and see where he's at," Renteria said. "He didn't feel quite right, and so he was in there earlier today getting treatment. We'll reevaluate tomorrow and make a determination where we're at in terms of trying to set some parameters for how we move forward."

A confusing, tricky series of injuries that Lawrie blamed on wearing orthotics limited him to 94 games last season. He hit the disabled list on July 22 and didn't discover the cause until after the season ended. But Lawrie reported to camp feeling healthy once again and has participated at 100 percent until this point, Renteria said.

"It's been good," Renteria said. "Everything has been clean. There have been no notifications anything had been amiss. He just woke up this morning and felt it. So we're going to be very cautious, take it a day at a time, reevaluate it and see where we're at."

Zack Collins, Yoan Moncada play as White Sox fall to Dodgers

Zack Collins, Yoan Moncada play as White Sox fall to Dodgers

GLENDALE, Ariz. — Manager Rick Renteria promised before Saturday's game the prospects would play and they certainly did.

White Sox prospects Zack Collins and Yoan Moncada both entered in the fifth inning of Saturday's 5-3 loss to the Los Angeles Dodgers at Camelback Ranch. Collins singled in two at-bats while Moncada, the centerpiece in the Chris Sale trade, went 0-for-2.

"It was fun," Collins said. "To be able to go out there on the first day was an honor to me. A little jittery, but very excited to play.

"I'm the new guy, it's my first year and the first game played and I get to play. It's definitely an honor."

It's a distinction that will be shared by many, Renteria said. With the White Sox focused on player development and a longer spring schedule, the prospects should get a long look. Given the club's top eight prospects — according to MLB.com — are in big league camp, many will see significant playing time early in camp.

"We've got a long spring and a lot of opportunities," Renteria said. "You're going to see a lot of our kids."

Reliever Zack Burdi, the 26th overall pick of last June's draft, is scheduled to appear in Sunday's game when the White Sox host the Rockies. The White Sox also tentatively have listed Michael Kopech and Reynaldo Lopez as the starting pitchers for their split-squad doubleheader on Tuesday. 

Collins took advantage of his first chance with a ninth-inning single off Dodgers pitcher Edward Paredes. Next up for the 2016 first-rounder is a report Monday for his teammates as part of Renteria's morning meetings.

"I have my little presentation going," Collins said. "I'll probably be more nervous than I will playing."